Jump to content

Zeppelin Mysteries Hosted by Steve A. Jones


SteveAJones
 Share

Recommended Posts

Whoa. Now I am starting to understand why some other bands dissed Zeppelin later. It must have been a blow to the ego to see those dudes walking into their recordings to make them not suck. Funny.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whoa. Now I am starting to understand why some other bands dissed Zeppelin later. It must have been a blow to the ego to see those dudes walking into their recordings to make them not suck. Funny.

This discussion about studio musicians reminds me of Steve Lukather of Toto who probably played on most of the big hair band records in the '80's that had hit songs.

And believe me, those bands didn't like the word getting out either

Just another example of how image over substance participated in killing good music and 20 years later how that has magnified itself.

Not that image is bad, if you can back it up. But I digress, subjectively so.

Edited by deluxe
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think studio musicians are not credited so they don't recieve royalties...the play the session, get their union check and that's it

(In best Ed Mcmahon voice) You are correct sir.

One more mystery solved...keep up the good work MD!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe it is also a bit of an un-written rule amongst session players that they didn't talk about whose sessions they played on. See for example the ongoing argument between the Kinks and Page as to whether he played on 'You Really Got Me'. It would be embarassing for them to admit that they didn't even record their biggest hit on their own......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe it is also a bit of an un-written rule amongst session players that they didn't talk about whose sessions they played on. See for example the ongoing argument between the Kinks and Page as to whether he played on 'You Really Got Me'. It would be embarassing for them to admit that they didn't even record their biggest hit on their own......

Yeah, I guess that would be embarassing...what does it say about their own skills that they needed someone else to play it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I guess that would be embarassing...what does it say about their own skills that they needed someone else to play it?

Their skill may have nothing to do with it, today artists have much more creative control than in the past. Alot of times an artists' vision and a producers' vision may be very different, and artists typically aren't receptive to others dictating to them how to create their art. Studio musicians just play what they are told to play

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I guess that would be embarassing...what does it say about their own skills that they needed someone else to play it?

It says alot about Jimmy's skills that he and Big Jim Sullivan were two of the preeminent session guitarists in London at that time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Sorry for '85" -- Robert Plant, Philadelphia Spectrum, May 23rd 1988

This may have been a direct reference to Live Aid (held in Philadelphia on July 13th 1985) as this was his first post-Live Aid concert in Philly but there's a possibility he was referring to the cancellation of his two Spectrum concerts to have been held on Aug 1-2 1985.

Anyone here who recalls what led to the cancellation of those two Philadelphia concerts?

They are among eight cancellations in three weeks following Live Aid. I have heard poor

tickets sales as one explanation and vocal problems (he was going hoarse) as the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone here who recalls what led to the cancellation of those two Philadelphia concerts? They are among eight cancellations in three weeks following Live Aid. I have heard poor tickets sales as one explanation and vocal problems (he was going hoarse) as the other.

This via PM from Stargroves Tangie:

I don't think those shows ever went on sale- in fact I don't even remember them being announced!

Back then I was in touch with someone who wrote a newsletter called "Plant Seeds/Firm Fans International", and I just went through some of the newsletters to see if I could find any clues. I have one that shows the first part of Robert's tour, from June 10 in Vancouver to August 1 in Philly, with a note at the bottom saying that additional shows are expected during late July into August. There was no mention of any MSG or Nassau Coliseum dates either.

The July 85 newsletter says "part 2 of the US tour may be scheduled for the fall". The Sept 1985 newsletter says " Robert's June 26th show in Memphis, which was postponed for Sept. now has been cancelled. During a recent interview on MTV, he spoke about returning to England for a rest period, rather than a second tour of the States."

Hope this helps!

-Tangie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Questions pertaining to soundboard Page/Plant tour videos came up in a Ramble On thread. The inquiry was does each of the Page/Plant concerts which were filmed for the overhead screens exist in their archive and did each camera have a recorder inside? This answer via private email with consent to post from Terry Stephenson:

P/P tour video presentation was done by a company out of San Francisco called Nocturne Video. They had about 5 camera men I think that each had a camera with a video cable that fed back to the video live-switch mixer. These cameras did NOT have tapes recording in the cameras, they acted as CAMERAS, not CAMCORDERS.

Each of these video signals was fed to the live-switch mixer where the director, Paul Becher, was directing his crew and choosing which camera feed to switch to at that time. The resulting image was shown on the big video screen, and at the same time this live-switch video mix was also being recorded on a Betacam deck, archiving the final product for P/P to have. The soundboard audio feed was also being fed into this record deck as well.

Every single P/P show was archived on tape from the live-video/audio mix, recorded to Betacam video tape. Every one of these tapes was sent back to the Nochturne Video office in SF and stored in their vault. On occasion P/P called for certain tapes to be pulled out for news promo releases, etc...this is how the pro-shot Irvine '95, Hartford '95, etc. got out.

The O2 concert was done differently; they had over 20 cameras going. There were 2 separate crews; one crew was dedicated to the live-switch mix shown on the video screen for the fans to see (as described above), and we've seen the result of this live mix with the sample clip of Black Dog that they released for the news.

The second video crew was shooting for the purpose of making/editing a DVD release later. Each of these cameras was recording HD digital tape, what is called "an iso tape" or isolated tape source that a video editor can study and pick shots from in post production.

In the case of EC '75 I think the 3 or 4 camera crew was doing both a live feed to the video screen and recording tape in the cameras at the same time. I remember reading that much of those tapes were not usable after all these years. Jimmy had the tapes restored through a process called "baking."

Edited by SteveAJones
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert Plant's CBS Records Recording Contract

In 1966 a talent scout with CBS Records signed 18-year-old Robert Plant to a recording contract.

Autumn '66, Plant proceeded to Regent Sound Studios on Denmark Street in London intent on recording a cover version of 'Incense' by The Angelos, however CBS had other ideas for the session.

Late '66, CBS Records released Plant's first single, 'You Better Run' b/w 'Everybody's Gonna Say' (co-written by Plant).

I cut my first record in ’66 and it was a cover of a Young Rascals track, You Better Run -“What‘re you trying to do to my heart” – it was all still about terms of endearment. And the lyric on the earlier Led Zeppelin stuff was really just a continuum of that idea of [Dion’s] “teen angel, can you hear me?” It‘s great to reflect on the whole idea of everything working out fine, but the reality is we still spend most of our lives on the road. -- Robert Plant (Mojo Magazine, 2007)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

John Paul Jones has confirmed the filming location for his night-time horse ride thru the

cemetary in The Song Remains the Same. It is St. Michael and All Angels in Withyham:

St. Michael and All Angels - Withyham

TQ 494355; One Mile North-East of Rye

Like many medieval churches educated to St Michael, Withyham Church is built on a tall natural promontory. This was the result of the earliest recorded appearance of St. Michael which took place on a hill in Italy in the fifth century. From then on he was associated with high places.

There is a charming font boldly carved with the date 1666 - part of series of fittings added after the church was burned by lightning in 1663. The glory of Withyham, however, is the north chapel built in 1680 by the Sackville family who still live locally. It contains monuments to many members of the family including the Earls of Dorset, Earls De La Warr and Lords Sackville.

The best known memorial commemorates the thirteen year old Thomas Sackville who died in 1677. It is free standing and shows the boys hand on a skull, with his parents looking on. Designed by Caius Cibber a Danish sculptor who came to England in the 1650s. It is regarded as his best work although he also worked at Chatsworth (Derbyshire) and Bottesford (Lincolnshire).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John Paul Jones: The 1967 Herman's Hermits Tour of Germany

John Paul Jones has confirmed he did in fact perform with Herman's Hermits in Germany on the "Yardley Tour", playing hammond organ for the string arrangements he did for those songs. He recalls playing in Hamburg, but isn't sure about any other dates.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I am seeking any additional information from this tour. Venues, dates, setlists. Herman's

Hermits had joined The Who for their first American tour in Summer 1967 so this tour of

Germany was either in the Spring or Winter of 1967.

Edited by SteveAJones
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve --

A new mystery for you:

In the early 1980s one of the Zep fanzines published a story about a group of Zep fans who visited Jimmy at his home c. 1981-82. Jimmy actually invited the group into his recording studio, and he played for them "a song off a just released album by a very famous drummer". According to the story, Jimmy played guitar on this song.

Any idea what song that was??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve --

A new mystery for you:

In the early 1980s one of the Zep fanzines published a story about a group of Zep fans who visited Jimmy at his home c. 1981-82. Jimmy actually invited the group into his recording studio, and he played for them "a song off a just released album by a very famous drummer". According to the story, Jimmy played guitar on this song.

Any idea what song that was??

Swandown, you actually mentioned this to me about five years ago but I don't think

we resolved it then beyond a reasonable doubt. I have the fanzine in question, but

not within arm's reach at the moment. It's the Oct/Nov/Dec 1981 issue of 'Runes'.

Five Americans visited him at Old Mill House on August 31st 1981 and while there he mentioned something to the effect of what you've said.The drummer in question was

not identified in the fanzine, and the name of the possible drummer eludes me at the moment, but it's worth noting it could have been someone involved with the 'Death

Wish 2' soundtrack or one who recorded at his Sol Studio down the road in Cookham.

I'll continue to jog my memory over this mystery so show this one as very much in progress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The obvious candidate would be Dave Mattacks (Fairport Convention drummer who played on the DW2 soundtrack), but he didn't release any solo recordings in the early '80s.

Then there's Alan White, who had recorded the XYZ demos with Jimmy earlier in the year. He did release a single with Chris Squire in the fall of 1981 ("Run With The Fox"), but I think we would have heard by now if Jimmy played on it.

Meanwhile, both Carmine Appice and Cozy Powell released solo albums in 1981. I know that Powell's name popped up several times when the rumor mill was talking about Zep reforming in 1981 -- I wonder if that was because he had been seen recording with Jimmy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...