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Zeppelin Mysteries Hosted by Steve A. Jones


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Wolfman, they've each lost a little height since their Led Zeppelin heyday so generally speaking Robert is between 6' & 6' 1" inch, Jimmy between 5' 11" & 6' and JPJ between

5' 9 & 5' 10".

Thanks. BTW, how tall was Bonzo?

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Steve, I really hope you can help with this one which indeed is a mystery to me. This concerns the Jimmy Page - Terry Reid - Keith Richards "triangle." Apparently Terry was actually interested in Jimmy's offer but there was at least one little problem: he had two US tours booked, one of them with the Stones.... so he told Jimmy You better call Keith because he's not going to be happy...

The question is - did Jimmy call? I saw the following comment on YouTube by supermanoliver: "...supposedly jimmy page asked keith richards if they could work something out and keith then threatened page or some crazy shit like that." Is that just a rumor?

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Steve, I really hope you can help with this one which indeed is a mystery to me. This concerns the Jimmy Page - Terry Reid - Keith Richards "triangle." Apparently Terry was actually interested in Jimmy's offer but there was at least one little problem: he had two US tours booked, one of them with the Stones.... so he told Jimmy You better call Keith because he's not going to be happy...

The question is - did Jimmy call? I saw the following comment on YouTube by supermanoliver: "...supposedly jimmy page asked keith richards if they could work something out and keith then threatened page or some crazy shit like that." Is that just a rumor?

While it's true Terry Reid was already committed to performing as the opening act for The Rolling Stones 1969 North American Tour at the time Jimmy approached him about

joining Led Zeppelin, his refusal to do so undoubtedly had more to do with Terry's own career aspirations as a solo artist than any perceived difficulities with Keith Richard. Securing the opening act slot for that tour was a significant oportunity for Terry to establish himself, and it's also worth noting he was a guitarist as well as a vocalist.

Terry and Robert Plant go back to '67, when Robert Plant and his Band of Joy, Terry Reid and Tim Rose performed on the same bill…they found at the time they both got

on very well socially.

In '68 Robert Plant and The Band of Joy were billed below him in Buxton. Terry watched their set and actually called Jimmy the following day. Coincidentally, The Band of Joy broke up soonafter, and a penniless Plant encountered Reid on Oxford Street in London whilst in town trying to get money from his manager. Reid invited Robert to join him for the journey back to Terry's place in Cambridge, where he informed him of the opportunity to work with Page.

Jimmy Page and Peter Grant (who was also managing Terry Reid at the time) crossed paths with Terry on Oxford Street (in July '68) and he readily suggested Robert Plant for Jimmy's new band.

Having secured the vocalist position in Led Zeppelin, Robert joined Terry for 30 minutes of singing during his gig at Mother's in Birmingham in 1969 and once more in the post-Zep era for a set of old blues standards at The Joint in Beverly Hills on Oct 20 2003.

Jimmy and Keith were undoubtedly familiar with one another having toured the UK together (The Rolling Stones / The Yardbirds / Ike & Tina Turner / Peter Jay and The Jay Walkers) from Sep/Oct '66, to say nothing of Page's session era. I doubt very much Keith would have been overly concerned about the intentions of an opening act (Terry Reid), and

the fact he, the Stones and Jimmy socialized throughout the '70s, '80s & '90s strongly

suggests there was no bad blood between them.

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Whatever happened regarding the dispute with Wolfgang's Vault and the live material, formerly "owned" by Bill Graham?

An extract of Led Zeppelin's April 27th 1969 Fillmore West is available from them here:

http://concerts.wolfgangsvault.com/dt/led-...t/764-4017.html

Hopefully, additional material will be licensed.

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the fact he, the Stones and Jimmy socialized throughout the '70s, '80s & '90s strongly

suggests there was no bad blood between them.

Thanks, so I guess a threat was highly unlikely... I was just wondering if Jimmy actually tried to talk with Keith or just gave up, just like he gave up on Steve Marriott, but I guess we'll never know... (Ironically in Steve's case there were also rumors of threats... Most likely though Jimmy's offer just wouldn't stand a chance - a yet-to-be-formed band vs Small Faces who had a #1 album in 1968? A no-brainer at the time.)

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Thanks, so I guess a threat was highly unlikely... I was just wondering if Jimmy actually tried to talk with Keith or just gave up, just like he gave up on Steve Marriott, but I guess we'll never know... (Ironically in Steve's case there were also rumors of threats... Most likely though Jimmy's offer just wouldn't stand a chance - a yet-to-be-formed band vs Small Faces who had a #1 album in 1968? A no-brainer at the time.)

Jimmy would have no reason to call Keith for Terry Reid's manager was Peter Grant. If any calls were to have been made getting Terry released from his commitment Peter Grant would have been the one to do so because that was his function. Allen Klein was

managing the Stones at the time and Mick Jagger, not Keith, was emerging as their new leader as Brian Jones, the band's founding member, faded and was ultimately kicked out of his own band by the others before that 1969 North American tour began.

I wouldn't say Jimmy "gave up", I would say he explored the possiblity and was smart

enough to realize quite quickly Terry wasn't interested. Remember, the Scandanavian tour contracts were already signed and set for September so Jimmy didn't have time

to waste looking for talent to complete the new lineup. Undoubtedly, this is the reason

why he immediately took up Terry's recommendation to go see Robert Plant perform.

He, Chris Dreja & Peter Grant went to see Plant perform on July 20, 1968. Essentially,

within two weeks Robert was in the band and encouraging his mate John Bonham to

join as well. A series of telegrams from Peter Grant followed.

Steve Marriott was not considered for Led Zeppelin in '68, he was considered back in '66 and ultimately became a benchmark for what Jimmy was looking for two years later. The

Marriott connection stems from the Page/Entwhistle/Moon lineup on Jeff Beck's 'Truth' album and the initial discussions they had about forming a new band together.

Jimmy was asked if that band was going to be Led Zeppelin and this is what he said: "It was, yeah. Not Led Zeppelin as a name; the name came afterwards. But it was said afterwards that that's what it could have been called. Because Moony (Who drummer Keith Moon) wanted get out of the Who and so did John Entwhistle (Who bassist), but when it came down to getting a hold of a singer, it was either going to be Steve Winwood [guitarist/organist/singer with English pop group Traffic] or Steve Marriott [guitarist/vocalist with Small Faces] . Finally it came down to Marriott. He was contacted, and the reply came back from his manager's office: "How would you like to have a group with no fingers, boys?" Or words to that effect. So the group was dropped because of Marriott's commitment to Small Faces. But I think it would have been the first of all those bands sort of like the Cream and everything. Instead, it didn't happen -- apart from the "Bolero." That's the closest it got. John Paul [Jones] is on that too; so is Nicky Hopkins [studio keyboard player with various British rock groups]."

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John Paul Jones payed on Terry's 1st album as well, on 2 songs - that's according to Bill Bonham... you probably know that.

it was either going to be Steve Winwood [guitarist/organist/singer with English pop group Traffic] or Steve Marriott

Very interesting... do you know if the offer was made to Winwood? I've seen the name mentioned before but don't know how seriously he was considered.

Edited by Gegenschein
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Very interesting... do you know if the offer was made to Winwood? I've seen the name mentioned before but don't know how seriously he was considered.

So far as I know Jimmy never approached Winwood, who, like Reid, was steadily building

his own career. I tell you what though, I saw Winwood perform at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute in Montreux, Switzerland back in 2006 and IMHO he flat out stole the show. He

did a rendition of 'Georgia On My Mind' that would've made Ray Charles weep. Robert

Plant also performed that night. Jimmy was to have joined Robert but cancelled the day

prior on account of medical concerns with his knee.

Edited by SteveAJones
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As I understand it, Grant was manager for Reid for only a short period of time before Reid signed up with Mickie Most. I believe that Grant and Page had spotted Reid walking down Oxford Street when they caught up with him and invited him back to the RAK offices for a discussion, when Reid told them he had done a solo deal with Most. I believe Grant is on record as saying Terry's father was also extremely damanding and difficult to deal with. It sounds to me that had Reid been available and signed up with Led Zeppelin, his stay in the band wouldn't have been very long or happy one.

In a RS interview with journalist Steve Rosen, Nicky Hopkins claims to have been asked to join Page's new band but turned it down in favour of Jeff Beck's group, whom Grant was managing at the time:

"As it happened, it was a choice between two bands. And Jimmy Page asked me to join his new band that was just forming and it was going to be called The New Yardbirds. And at the same time, Beck asked me to join. Decision time. They were both managed by Peter Grant and Peter couldn’t sway me one way or the other. He said, “That’s up to you to make a choice, I know.” So I thought, “Well, New Yardbirds…That sounds a bit ....” So I thought, Beck has done his first tour, Page has got a new band that hasn’t been tried out. At least Beck has already done one tour, which was really popular. So I chose Beck."

Meg

Jimmy would have no reason to call Keith for Terry Reid's manager was Peter Grant. If any calls were to have been made getting Terry released from his commitment Peter Grant would have been the one to do so because that was his function. Allen Klein was

managing the Stones at the time and Mick Jagger, not Keith, was emerging as their new leader as Brian Jones, the band's founding member, faded and was ultimately kicked out of his own band by the others before that 1969 North American tour began.

I wouldn't say Jimmy "gave up", I would say he explored the possiblity and was smart

enough to realize quite quickly Terry wasn't interested. Remember, the Scandanavian tour contracts were already signed and set for September so Jimmy didn't have time

to waste looking for talent to complete the new lineup. Undoubtedly, this is the reason

why he immediately took up Terry's recommendation to go see Robert Plant perform.

He, Chris Dreja & Peter Grant went to see Plant perform on July 20, 1968. Essentially,

within two weeks Robert was in the band and encouraging his mate John Bonham to

join as well. A series of telegrams from Peter Grant followed.

Steve Marriott was not considered for Led Zeppelin in '68, he was considered back in '66 and ultimately became a benchmark for what Jimmy was looking for two years later. The

Marriott connection stems from the Page/Entwhistle/Moon lineup on Jeff Beck's 'Truth' album and the initial discussions they had about forming a new band together.

Jimmy was asked if that band was going to be Led Zeppelin and this is what he said: "It was, yeah. Not Led Zeppelin as a name; the name came afterwards. But it was said afterwards that that's what it could have been called. Because Moony (Who drummer Keith Moon) wanted get out of the Who and so did John Entwhistle (Who bassist), but when it came down to getting a hold of a singer, it was either going to be Steve Winwood [guitarist/organist/singer with English pop group Traffic] or Steve Marriott [guitarist/vocalist with Small Faces] . Finally it came down to Marriott. He was contacted, and the reply came back from his manager's office: "How would you like to have a group with no fingers, boys?" Or words to that effect. So the group was dropped because of Marriott's commitment to Small Faces. But I think it would have been the first of all those bands sort of like the Cream and everything. Instead, it didn't happen -- apart from the "Bolero." That's the closest it got. John Paul [Jones] is on that too; so is Nicky Hopkins [studio keyboard player with various British rock groups]."

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As I understand it, Grant was manager for Reid for only a short period of time before Reid signed up with Mickie Most. I believe that Grant and Page had spotted Reid walking down Oxford Street when they caught up with him and invited him back to the RAK offices for a discussion, when Reid told them he had done a solo deal with Most. I believe Grant is on record as saying Terry's father was also extremely damanding and difficult to deal with. It sounds to me that had Reid been available and signed up with Led Zeppelin, his stay in the band wouldn't have been very long or happy one.

In a RS interview with journalist Steve Rosen, Nicky Hopkins claims to have been asked to join Page's new band but turned it down in favour of Jeff Beck's group, whom Grant was managing at the time:

"As it happened, it was a choice between two bands. And Jimmy Page asked me to join his new band that was just forming and it was going to be called The New Yardbirds. And at the same time, Beck asked me to join. Decision time. They were both managed by Peter Grant and Peter couldn’t sway me one way or the other. He said, “That’s up to you to make a choice, I know.” So I thought, “Well, New Yardbirds…That sounds a bit ....” So I thought, Beck has done his first tour, Page has got a new band that hasn’t been tried out. At least Beck has already done one tour, which was really popular. So I chose Beck."

Meg

Great moments in history!

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So far as I know Jimmy never approached Winwood, who, like Reid, was steadily building

his own career. I tell you what though, I saw Winwood perform at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute in Montreux, Switzerland back in 2006 and IMHO he flat out stole the show. He

did a rendition of 'Georgia On My Mind' that would've made Ray Charles weep. Robert

Plant also performed that night. Jimmy was to have joined Robert but cancelled the day

prior on account of medical concerns with his knee.

Wow. Funny you should mention that... last night I had another "one-artist night on YouTube" till past 3 AM and it was dedicated to Winwood (yeah I know not all the best is available there... still there was a lot new to me) IMHO between him, Marriott, Reid and Plant his voice is the most powerful and the least aging with time. Though not quite as raspy as the other three... anyway, I love all 4, though it's a bit more personal with Marriott and Reid, and I could go on forever about them but I don't think this is the right place, so I'll take this elsewhere. Thanks for all the info! :thanku:

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An extract of Led Zeppelin's April 27th 1969 Fillmore West is available from them here:

http://concerts.wolfgangsvault.com/dt/led-...t/764-4017.html

Hopefully, additional material will be licensed.

I wish I could share the entire show here. Both sets are just scorching. :blink:

Early Zeppelin is just so raw... so much more bluesy and downright Earth shattering. Damn I love those early shows!

22 minute HMMT anybody?

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Wow. Funny you should mention that... last night I had another "one-artist night on YouTube" till past 3 AM and it was dedicated to Winwood (yeah I know not all the best is available there... still there was a lot new to me) IMHO between him, Marriott, Reid and Plant his voice is the most powerful and the least aging with time. Though not quite as raspy as the other three... anyway, I love all 4, though it's a bit more personal with Marriott and Reid, and I could go on forever about them but I don't think this is the right place, so I'll take this elsewhere. Thanks for all the info! :thanku:

hope you took the opportunity to score some live traffic....some good footage out there with winwood playing some kickass guitar...

dear mr. fantasy

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What I don't get is why Walter Reid was even involved in this... :blink: wasn't Terry of legal age by this time?

He was of legal age at the time and (to clarify) had just signed a solo deal with Mickie Most, who shared an office with Peter Grant at 154 Oxford Street. More from Terry:

The story of your involvement with the genesis of Led Zeppelin is a time worn story...

Yeah. I see quite a bit of Robert [Plant] and them. When we were just in England, Jimmy Page showed up at the gig.

Oh did he?

And he sat there and laughed his head off the whole way through. I was cracking jokes the whole time. I can’t necessarily say, you know, “Hey Jimmy!” He was ten rows in front of me, sitting across the table. It was like just a club. And rather than get attention to him, and then everybody bug him, I let him have a night off. It was dark, and nobody really saw him there.

Yeah, he wouldn’t be laughing anymore if you pointed him out to everyone.

Exactly. That wouldn’t be funny, would it? So, he had a good time. He stayed all evening. Afterwards, we were having a good ‘ol time.

That’s good.

So, we started years ago. See, we all came up together, really. I mean Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, the Yardbirds…a long while ago, like in ‘65. In ’65, I toured with him with the Stones - when he was with the Yardbirds. Jeff and Jimmy were both in the group then. So, I’ve known Jimmy for quite a long time, and then when he was putting a group together, we were talking about it, and he was talking to a bunch of different singers. He wanted me to do it. He wanted Steve Marriott to do it. He wanted a bunch of people. The thing was he really wanted to put it together and I came up with the idea of Robert and John Bonham. And hey, I must admittedly say, it worked. Boy, did it work!

Yeah, no kidding.

See, that’s why I keep hearing about it. It’s like “Why the hell did you do that?” And I’m goin’ “I don’t know. It just sounded like a good idea at the time.”

Well, people were forming new groups all the time. Nobody had any way of knowing what would happen later.

I could tell you a couple of other suggestions that didn’t work. At that time, everybody was putting groups together. There were a lot of suggestions that sometimes we’d say “Oh, that would never happen”, and it did. Or we’d say “Oh, that would be incredible.” Blind Faith was the one that always got me. You know, it seemed like the perfect group. Steve [Winwood], Eric [Clapton] and Ginger [baker]. I think it lasted for ten minutes, before they all started arguing. It’s hard enough playing with in a group with Ginger in the first place. So it’s funny, you put groups together thinking it would be a great idea, but it doesn’t necessarily mean so.

Yeah. Well, every time your name is mentioned, it seems like the Zeppelin story goes hand in hand with it.

Like I say, we still see a lot of each other. Me and Jimmy were talking over there about how we should get together and maybe do something. I mean, hey, you never know. Any given time, we could do something. So, who knows?

People usually talk about it as a tale of bad luck or missed opportunity, but I get the impression from reading other interviews with you that you don’t really see it that way.

Oh, no. No, I don’t think bad luck. That’s how people perceive things. It’s like “Well, I would have done it.” But, you know, they didn’t ask you. It’s none of your bloody business. Stay out of it. Not only that, they don’t know what they’d be biting off in the first place. I mean, it was no easy row to hoe, I’ll tell you that.

Well, what were your thoughts when you heard Zeppelin’s first album? Was that something that you could have heard yourself doing, looking back at it?

Well, see that’s the thing. I didn’t look at it that way ‘cause Robert’s a good friend of mine. And I got on with John [bonham, Led Zeppelin’s drummer] real well, as well. And I was just happy for them. It was great ‘cause they were in a band in Birmingham that was knocking around, and suddenly - BAM! - we all know when you’ve got something that’s really going on. It was just as much as a shock to Jim and all of them that it was really happening. John Paul Jones - I’ve known him for years – was with Donovan. He was Donovan’s bass player and he did a lot of other things, but he wasn’t your first heavy rock choice, you know. He’s a very, very good musician. And it’s just amazing how he fit that band like a glove. It was perfect. Everybody just fit together right. I always say if you get a group that really works, don’t try and explain it. Don’t try and figure it out, because it will ruin it.

Just enjoy it.

Yeah, exactly. ‘Cause anybody in the band starts to say, “Well, the reason that we play so well…” uh-oh, here we go (laughs). It’s not gonna be the same thing anymore. You don’t stand and figure it out while it’s happening. Just shut up, and put the hammer down. It’s rock and roll!

What can you tell me about the concept behind the cover of these the ‘Superlungs’ CD? It bears more than a passing resemblance to Led Zeppelin’s first album cover, from the photo and the title font, to the orange photo on the back.

Uh well, that wasn’t my choice. That was EMI. I don’t know. Actually, I never picked up on that. I know what you’re saying. The grey and the orange, yeah yeah.

If you hold them right next to each other, and they’re almost the same. Except you don’t look like a zeppelin. (laughs)

I’m not on fire, right! I’m not going down in smoke. No, I think that’s just the art department, but actually I didn’t pick up on that.

Well, I think it’s a clever nod to the story most often told about you.

Yeah, it’s a sort of innuendo…yeah, that’s pretty cool, actually.

So, you’re comfortable with that?

Oh yeah. I’m comfortable with everything. I mean, you can’t design press, you know.

Well, what was funny was when I picked it up at Tower Records, I’m holding it and I’m looking at it as I popped it into the CD player, and I’m thinking to myself “Damn, this looks so familiar. Where have I seen it before?”

Yeah, it never dawned on me. EMI America did that album cover. The one in England, me and Tim Chatsfield were very involved in. He would say “Do you like this picture? Do you like that?” And in the end, I said “Look Tim, you take the ball. Whatever you want to put out. I like all of what you do, and then quite frankly, I’m very flattered that you are gonna do this retrospect thing. Hey, I like this, this and this - you pick the ones. Leave me out of it. It will all work for me.” And he said “You know, I just wanted to run it by you.” If it was a new album, that’d be a different deal. I mean, you want to have control of what you are putting out new. But on re-releases and things like that, you have to let the company feel involved in the thing. Because it’s their piece of merchandise, and you have to let them go with it. Because it’s the past, it’s not like representing me, necessarily. It’s all good.

Edited by SteveAJones
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I believe Terry was first managed by his father when he joined Peter Jay and the Jaywalkers, at the age of 15. Their last single was called "The Hand That Don't Fit the Glove" and was credited as Terry Reid and the Jaywalkers, in April 1967. In February 1968, Reid was signed up by manager/producer Mickie Most, so Grant's dealings with Reid and his father must have been before this date. Grant's comments on his father can be found on page 55 of Welch's biography. I've dug up an old copy of a Jimmy Page interview in Mojo magazine:

"We'd done a gig at Albert Hall - a great bill: us [The Yardbirds], the Stones, the Ike & Tina Tuner Revue, and this band Peter Jay and The Jaywalkers, which had Terry Reid in it. I remembered him as a really good singer, so I told Peter [Grant], that I wanted to start a group with Terry Reid, so could he get the office to find him. I had all these ideas and I wanted to get it right. So I'm back in England after the end of this Yardbirds tour, and Peter said 'Well I've located Terry, but he's just signed a solo deal.' I said 'Who with?' He said 'Mickie Most!' Now you know their two desks faced each other, right?!"

Looking up the date in Alan Clayson's Yardbirds chronology, that Albert Hall concert was on Friday 23rd September 1966. The Jaywalkers were third on the bill.

Reid said after his meeting with Grant and Page at the RAK office in 1968:

"Jimmy asked me to be the singer in Led Zeppelin but I'd just done a deal to support the Stones on their first US tour in three years.”

Looking up the date in Roy Carr's Stones chronology, this was the Rolling Stones tour was set to commence on July 7, 1969 at State University, Fort Collins CO. So the contracts for that must have been signed well in advance by Reid and Most.

Robert Plant in an interview with Uncut magazine on Terry Reid:

"We were good friends because we seemed to be on the same circuit...we always seemed to be playing on the same bill together. He was one of those stellar vocalists along with Steve Winwood, Jess Roden and Steve Marriott, and he got the offer from his connection with Mickie Most, who shared an office with Peter Grant...so Terry said to Peter and Jimmy, "No I've go this thing going. But you should see my mate. Go and have a look at 'the Wild Man From The Black Country.'"

According to Terry Reid in an interview with Peter Doggett for Record Collector 1992:

"I was doing a gig. I think it was in Buxton with the Band of Joy. I'd seen them before, and I knew Robert Plant and John Bonham. And this time, as I watched them, I thought: 'That's it!' I could hear the whole thing in my head. So the next day I phoned up Jimmy. He said, 'What does this singer look like?' I said, 'What do you mean, what does he look like? He looks like a Greek god, but what does that matter? I'm talking about how he sings. And his drummer is phenomenal. Check it out!' “

That Reid gig (it was Hobbstweedle not BoJ) according to Melody Maker was on Saturday 13th July 1968. So the discussion to see Plant on the 20th, was made on the 14th July. Which means Page must have asked Reid sometime in the week between the 8th and 13th to join his band.

Side trivia: Noddy Holder who would eventually find fame with Slade was Hobbstweedle's roadie.

What I don't get is why Walter Reid was even involved in this... :blink: wasn't Terry of legal age by this time?
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I believe Terry was first managed by his father when he joined Peter Jay and the Jaywalkers, at the age of 15. Their last single was called "The Hand That Don't Fit the Glove" and was credited as Terry Reid and the Jaywalkers, in April 1967. In February 1968, Reid was signed up by manager/producer Mickie Most, so Grant's dealings with Reid and his father must have been before this date. Grant's comments on his father can be found on page 55 of Welch's biography. I've dug up an old copy of a Jimmy Page interview in Mojo magazine:

"We'd done a gig at Albert Hall - a great bill: us [The Yardbirds], the Stones, the Ike & Tina Tuner Revue, and this band Peter Jay and The Jaywalkers, which had Terry Reid in it. I remembered him as a really good singer, so I told Peter [Grant], that I wanted to start a group with Terry Reid, so could he get the office to find him. I had all these ideas and I wanted to get it right. So I'm back in England after the end of this Yardbirds tour, and Peter said 'Well I've located Terry, but he's just signed a solo deal.' I said 'Who with?' He said 'Mickie Most!' Now you know their two desks faced each other, right?!"

Looking up the date in Alan Clayson's Yardbirds chronology, that Albert Hall concert was on Friday 23rd September 1966. The Jaywalkers were third on the bill.

Reid said after his meeting with Grant and Page at the RAK office in 1968:

"Jimmy asked me to be the singer in Led Zeppelin but I'd just done a deal to support the Stones on their first US tour in three years.”

Looking up the date in Roy Carr's Stones chronology, this was the Rolling Stones tour was set to commence on July 7, 1969 at State University, Fort Collins CO. So the contracts for that must have been signed well in advance by Reid and Most.

Robert Plant in an interview with Uncut magazine on Terry Reid:

"We were good friends because we seemed to be on the same circuit...we always seemed to be playing on the same bill together. He was one of those stellar vocalists along with Steve Winwood, Jess Roden and Steve Marriott, and he got the offer from his connection with Mickie Most, who shared an office with Peter Grant...so Terry said to Peter and Jimmy, "No I've go this thing going. But you should see my mate. Go and have a look at 'the Wild Man From The Black Country.'"

According to Terry Reid in an interview with Peter Doggett for Record Collector 1992:

"I was doing a gig. I think it was in Buxton with the Band of Joy. I'd seen them before, and I knew Robert Plant and John Bonham. And this time, as I watched them, I thought: 'That's it!' I could hear the whole thing in my head. So the next day I phoned up Jimmy. He said, 'What does this singer look like?' I said, 'What do you mean, what does he look like? He looks like a Greek god, but what does that matter? I'm talking about how he sings. And his drummer is phenomenal. Check it out!' “

That Reid gig (it was Hobbstweedle not BoJ) according to Melody Maker was on Saturday 13th July 1968. So the discussion to see Plant on the 20th, was made on the 14th July. Which means Page must have asked Reid sometime in the week between the 8th and 13th to join his band.

Side trivia: Noddy Holder who would eventually find fame with Slade was Hobbstweedle's roadie.

Thanks for posting this--I was there ^^ and it was a great night! Long John Baldry was also on the bill, but always seems to get overlooked--possibly he didn't perform on the rest of the tour or something.

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It was a tour which kicked off at the Albert Hall. It was one of those crazy tours where they played two sessions on every date as well as cramming in filming for Michelangelo Antonioni's film "Blow Up".

Thanks for posting this--I was there ^^ and it was a great night! Long John Baldry was also on the bill, but always seems to get overlooked--possibly he didn't perform on the rest of the tour or something.
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Looking up the date in Alan Clayson's Yardbirds chronology, that Albert Hall concert was on Friday 23rd September 1966. The Jaywalkers were third on the bill.

----------------

Robert Plant in an interview with Uncut magazine on Terry Reid: "We were good friends because we seemed to be on the same circuit...

-----------------

That Reid gig (Buxton) (it was Hobbstweedle not BoJ) according to Melody Maker was on Saturday 13th July 1968.

Yes, that's correct and it was the first night of the tour. Michaelangelo Antonioni attended and decided upon The Yardbirds as the right act for his film 'Blow Up'. Once the tour ended, they were filmed at Elstree Film Studios in Borehamwood (Oct 12-14)

performing 'Stroll On'. They also performed a jam for the production crew once the

filming was completed. A studio session for 'Stroll On' was held at Advision before the

band departed for America the following week.

-----------------

The famous Regan circuit in the Midlands...here's more:

The woman who cooked chicken and chips for The Beatles and made sure Noddy Holder stayed off the ale was given a moving send-off as musicians joined family and friends for her funeral.

More than 100 people were at the Plaza, Old Hill, to remember 94-year-old Mary Regan, known as Ma to the bands she employed, after yesterday's funeral at The Oratory, Edgbaston. Mourners were asked to play bingo in her honour.

It was free to all Plaza members and called by Ron Jordan, 79, who was resident bingo caller at the club for more than 20 years.

Grandson Darren Howe, 38, of Brighton, paid tribute to a "formidable but kindly" Irish grandmother, a teacher turned club owner who brought top 60s bands to the Black Country venue.

She also ran three Birmingham clubs, including the Plaza, Handsworth, and the Ritz, Kings Heath, which became known as "the Regan circuit".

Acts on the circuit included The Beatles, Kinks, The Animals, Dusty Springfield, Brenda Lee, The Searchers, The Tremeloes, Gerry and The Pacemakers, Manfred Mann, The Moody Blues, Jerry Lee Lewis and Del Shannon.

Geoff Thompson and John Crutchley, who played in a band called Listen with later Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant at Old Hill, were among those paying respects yesterday.

Cannock-born Geoff, 63, now of Walsall, said: "Doing sometimes three gigs in a night was unique to this area, and they were great times." John, 61, of Aldridge, said: "Robert Plant was DJ here when we came to play and Ma got him in with us when our rhythm guitarist left. You could say that without Ma Regan, Led Zeppelin might not have happened."

Bob Bailey, who used to drive the bands, said of The Beatles: "When they played here, there was nowhere for them to stay so Ma put them up at her home in Woodbourne Road, Edgbaston."

Mrs Regan, who had two children, six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, died on March 13.

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Confirmation of the Buxton date (Eye Thank Yew!) does make it an Obstweedle gig, as Robert had disbanded the Band of Joy in May 1968. He gigged at a few Alexis Korner dates before forming Obstweedle.

Please note Robert Plant himself confirmed the correct spelling is Obstweedle (during interview conducted in Toronto on July 4, 1998).

Edited by SteveAJones
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Page must have asked Reid sometime in the week between the 8th and 13th to join his band.

Side trivia: Noddy Holder who would eventually find fame with Slade was Hobbstweedle's roadie.

Great research, thanks a million... is it sad, funny, ironic or all of the above that I've actually already seen all these quotes/interviews and recognize them instantly? :unsure: Though I must admit that Terry interview Steve posted was new to me... That figuring out of the date in July was neat. Wow. I used to think I'm just an oddball and most LZ fans don't give a rat's behind about anyone but the four LZ members....

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Mystery: The Robert Plant House Fire

In 1978 the City of Kidderminster's Fire Station dispatched firefighters to the home of Robert Plant to extinguish a chimney fire. Robert later stopped by the fire station for a cigarette and a cup of tea and signed several Led Zeppelin albums for the fire fighters. I'm seeking any additional information.

Did he ask the firemen if they knew of a good chimney sweeper? :lol:

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