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stonefreelee

Sept. 25th, 1980

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how frickin' rude (to say the least)! Never heard of that jerk, being an american, but boy, what a no-class piece of tripe to disrespect JB, his family, his fans and LZ like that...man, that makes me mad...and for something to make me mad 27 years years later...wow.

Agreed. There were some people were incredible insensitive about his passing. I remember my friend/co-worker (who, while he was not a Zep fan knew, through me, how important the band was to me musically and personally) was helping my husband and me leave work after I heard the awful news. As we were leaving I heard in response to someone who asked what happened another person reply, disrespectfully and derisively, "Nothing. Just the drummer from Led Zeppelin died." My friend turned to him and said, "No, rock lost a brilliant drummer and she lost someone who was special to her."

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Standing in the ballroom of the Sheraton in New Carrollton, MD talking with a co-worker when a cook burst through the kitchen doors and told us that Bonham had kicked the bucket. After picking up our jaws off the floor and blinking several times to hold back tears, I remember thinking two things: one was that I was right in seeing Led Zeppelin, August 11th, 1979 because I told my friends that you could not be so sure that they would be around for much longer. Number two was that I wouldn't have to be waiting in line at the Cap Centre for tickets to go on sale. Such a sad day. Looking back it was a useless death.

I was in middle school when a school friend said "hey man, did you hear one of the guys from Led Zeppelin died?I think it was the drummer."I was floored and didn't believe him, especially since my brother was at the Capitol Center, to camp out for tickets.He was only allowed to do so under the stipulation that he had to get a ticket for me as well.I think tickets were set to go on sale on the 26th,and my brother and a few of his friends got to the Cap Center a day early to secure a good spot in line.Of course there were already tons of people there when the announcement was made.

I got on the bus, and our bus driver had the local rock radio station on and they were talking about Bonzo's passing.

I was doubly crushed.Not only had my favorite drummer passed, but my dream of FINALLY being "old enough" to see my favorite band and been squashed.

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I was in 6th grade and had a copy of -led zep 4 and a copy of -the doors/waiting for the sun from my parents, which i listened to a few songs off each record over and over at that time. I remember -john lennons passing mostly, because of the effect it had on my parents and what i saw on the news. In regards to -led zep, it was only a band name which i heard other grammar school kids talk about, how their older brothers and sisters went to see a -led zeppelin show, really had no concept or grasp of music back then. So, i have no memories or comprehension.

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I was on the train home from my high school teaching job, and read a story on the back of someone else's Evening Standard that seemed to say that Bonzo had been found dead . . I kept hoping I was misreading, and was going out of my mind waiting to get to my station so that I could buy a copy for myself. I still remember standing in the station reading the story in disbelief--literally, thinking they must have got it wrong somehow . . .

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Agreed. There were some people were incredible insensitive about his passing.

[/quote0]

Yes, i do remember there was a certain element that actually seemed to be somewhat gleeful of the situation...what now would be called, "the haters".

Some elements were so jealous of them and their success...they were glad it happened, some more discretely than others. Like the guy who called me Sept.25th, 1980. As I said earlier, he was no zeppelin fan and basically a friend of a friend...I really believe (looking back in retrospect) that he enjoyed making that call...

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Nothing was worse than the passing of Garcia for me. It literally felt like someone had ripped my heart right out of my chest. Still does. And I could never really fathom how people could look me in the eye and tell me to just get over it. You don't share years of your life with someone and NOT be profoundly affected by the loss of them. You just don't.

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And speaking of insensitivity--I remember when girls at school actually laughed and teased me when Brian Jones died.

:( That's just beyond my comprehension - incredibly judgemental and insensitive.

I was just at the age of being able to go to a concert and I remember hearing that Zep was touring in the States. I was thrilled beyond words just waiting for the news and then figuring out how I'd get a ticket. When I heard the news, I was in total disbelief and it was incomprehensible. I kept thinking it was a mistake or I'd heard wrong. Sadly I didn't.

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I was in a sculpture studio at The University of Montevallo when classmate told me a member of Led Zeppelin had died.She couldn't tell me who it was.I split the class and went to newspaper box.That's where I read that John Bonham had passed.It's still a vivid memory.

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After reading these stories I'm almost...almost glad that I was too young to experience Zep in the 60s/70s. Well, going by the Tibetan Book of the Dead, I was there through late 1971 but coming of age in the 70s, falling in-love with Zep, and then having to accept the end would have been terribly difficult.

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Accepting the end wasn't as hard as accepting them going on without John would have been. In truth, I was grateful to my core that Robert, Jimmy and Jonesy ended it after Johns death. For me, that brought closer.

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After reading these stories I'm almost...almost glad that I was too young to experience Zep in the 60s/70s. Well, going by the Tibetan Book of the Dead, I was there through late 1971 but coming of age in the 70s, falling in-love with Zep, and then having to accept the end would have been terribly difficult.

yeah, but what can any of us do when we lose a loved one? All we can do is grieve and try to move on...same with Bonzo...although obviously not a close friend, he was more like a family member...and the loss was equally as devastating. All we can do now is to celebrate the man and his enormous accomplishments...look how many MILLIONS UPON MILLIONS of people have had their lives uplifted by "the boys" and their music...that is what i choose to remember...

Edited by stonefreelee

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yeah, but what can any of us do when we lose a loved one? All we can do is grieve and try to move on...I lost my best friend of 29 years back in August.

I hear you. From my own personal experience, it's better to have loved and lost than to not have known at all. I suspect you feel that same way about your best friend.

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8th grade. Already had been a major Zep addict for several years. My drummer (sounds funny to call him that now) came up to me in the lunchline and said Bonzo is dead. I thought he meant his dog, who was named Bonzo. He said No, the real Bonzo. We cut school for the day, got really stoned, and played Zeppelin at my friend Lance's house. That night, Jim Ladd, the Lonesome LA Cowboy on radio station KMET, locked the studio doors and played Moby Dick over and over. All night. We wore black armbands at school the next day. We withdrew our deposits on Zep tickets for the hoped for American tour. We shut down. Some of us cried and played guitars, the rest got into metal.

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I hear you. From my own personal experience, it's better to have loved and lost than to not have known at all. I suspect you feel that same way about your best friend.

LONG LIVE ZEP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Edited by stonefreelee

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I was in middle school when a school friend said "hey man, did you hear one of the guys from Led Zeppelin died?I think it was the drummer."I was floored and didn't believe him, especially since my brother was at the Capitol Center, to camp out for tickets.He was only allowed to do so under the stipulation that he had to get a ticket for me as well.I think tickets were set to go on sale on the 26th,and my brother and a few of his friends got to the Cap Center a day early to secure a good spot in line.Of course there were already tons of people there when the announcement was made.

I got on the bus, and our bus driver had the local rock radio station on and they were talking about Bonzo's passing.

I was doubly crushed.Not only had my favorite drummer passed, but my dream of FINALLY being "old enough" to see my favorite band and been squashed.

bummer

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Nothing was worse than the passing of Garcia for me. It literally felt like someone had ripped my heart right out of my chest. Still does. And I could never really fathom how people could look me in the eye and tell me to just get over it. You don't share years of your life with someone and NOT be profoundly affected by the loss of them. You just don't.

aptly put, Idunn...

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I was attending Jefferson Elementary School in Des Moines, Iowa. This didn't make waves in the 2nd grade. The earth stood still on Dec 9th though. I got the bad Zepp news from People magazine in a dentists' office, Jan 81. I may have even thought Led Zeppelin was a guy until that moment.

PS: Sometimes I wonder if my fellow Led Heads of the time Scott W and Chuck W are still out there. Boy did we love rock! If you are out there, give me a holler. -Mike.d

Edited by rokarolla

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When I first heard the news, well My father came upstairs, told me that John Bonham had died, so I

switched on the radio, I lived in the Midlands at that time so the news was about Bonzo. One station's

DJ came on on & said If you have not heard the news, John Bonham has died & played the live

version of Stairway to Heaven, then the news sunk in about 1.00am in the morning.

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I am of the age that I remember vividly the passing of many greats in music, including Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, in the 70's.

I am also of the age that I remember all to vividly the passing of JFK, RFK, Martin Luther King in the 60's.

These happened when my life was easy-going and fun and I was still looking at life through rose-colored glasses, albiet they were getting clouded and dirtied with each passing year.

John Bonham's passing was the same year as John Lennon's, but by that time I was struggling with the realities of life , a near death illness due to a miscarriage, a divorce in the beginning of 1980 and the single motherhooded-ness that was thrust upon me.

Although I was saddened by John Lennon's death, John Bonham's went relatively unnoticed by me. I knew it was the end of an era, the end of Led Zeppelin, but I had more pressing issues to deal with in my own life.

People do not die for us immediately, but remain bathed in a sort of aura of life which bears no relation to true immortality but through which they continue to occupy our thoughts in the same way as when they were alive. It is as though they were traveling abroad. ~Marcel Proust

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I was in the 3rd grade and had no clue who Led Zeppelin were. Just in the years following I would find out about them in the Hit Parader, Creem, and Circus mags.

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I was 16 then.

It was 26 September when my mother told me and showed me the front page of the newspaper.

I was in shock and I cried.

It was because of the death of Bonzo and also the immediate realisation that it was the end of Zeppelin.

I didn't go to school and some 'friends' teased me about it the next day. I felt like hitting out at them but its a good job I didn't because I didn't have proper control of my emotions.

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