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Well lets face it nobody can replace Gilmour for feel on the guitar , but one of my mates who I am going with saw Waters do DSOTM afew years back and he said it was better than when he heard floyd do it back in the 70's !!

That's subjective innit??! :)

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Everyone seems to be pro-Syd Barrett days, and fair enough, he was a unique influence in songwriting, and I know David Bowie is particularly fond of him, but I'm solidly a Roger Waters man.

Roger Waters had this, and still has, this striking ability to tap into how people are feeling, how disillusioned people are feeling.

And in the whole Led Zep versus Pink Floyd thing, I mean you can't fault Led Zep on musicality, that's for sure, but Robert Plant's lyrics just come nowhere near Roger Waters'. I mean all Robert ever sang about was another bloody woman or all that mystical/lord of the rings stuff, which I guess suited the kind of thing Led Zep were doing, because I always felt Led Zep were about incredibly good rock and roll music, but not really about depth of meaning or social commentary.

Led Zep never had an album that affected me as much as what Dark Side and The Wall did, and even Animals.

What do you get for pretending the danger's not real.

Meek and obedient you follow the leader

Down well trodden corridors into the valley of steel.

What a surprise!

A look of terminal shock in your eyes.

Now things are really what they seem.

No, this is no bad dream.

And I can feel one of my turns coming on.

I feel cold as a razor blade,

Tight as a tourniquet,

Dry as a funeral drum.

Run to the bedroom,

In the suitcase on the left

You'll find my favorite axe.

Don't look so frightened

This is just a passing phase,

One of my bad days.

Tired of lying in the sunshine staying home to watch the rain.

You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today.

And then one day you find ten years have got behind you.

No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun.

Every year is getting shorter never seem to find the time.

Plans that either come to naught or half a page of scribbled lines

Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way

The time is gone, the song is over,

Thought I'd something more to say.

They are brilliant poignant lyrics for me which speak volumes, and for me Robert Plant's lyrics just never came anywhere near this

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which I guess suited the kind of thing Led Zep were doing, because I always felt Led Zep were about incredibly good rock and roll music, but not really about depth of meaning or social commentary.

I think thats what made zep good, they just played music, they weren't out there to change the world. Zep was very good not to get political, which only helps them. Most people use music to get away, not to hear somebody bitch or cry about the government or their lives. There both as good in my opinion, but they are two different bands. the Beatles took a big hit when they went political, the rolling stones stopped being political, and got bigger. The Who is a great band, but with that Tommy shit, ever body like WTF. and i think that hurt The Who, they should be up there with the Floyd's, stones, zep, and Beatles, but The Who is just afterthought.

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Tommy may have rubbed some people the wrong way but it didn't hurt them because 2 years later they released one of the best studio albums ever made...Who's Next.

I didn't mean musically, but that whole rock opera thing did hurt them. I don't have any serous proof, but they should've been bigger then what they are. I love their music tho. and Who next is one of the greatest rock albums. I thought it was as good as any beatles or stones.

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May 20, 2008

Roger Waters at the O2 Arena, London SE10

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol...icle3963045.ece

Roger Waters once described A Momentary Lapse of Reason - the first Pink Floyd album to be recorded after he had left the group - as a “clever forgery”. Ironically, it was this rather ungracious phrase that came to mind as the 64-year-old singer and bass player returned to London at the helm of what was a superb Pink Floyd show in almost every detail but for the absence of Pink Floyd.

There were searing blasts of pyrotechnics, thunderous sound effects ricocheting around a “360 degree” speaker system and a giant inflatable pig (now radio controlled, apparently) floating above the audience. Grand cinematic visions of interstellar landscapes and cosmic debris accompanied numbers that included Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun, Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Have a Cigar and Wish You Were Here. And this was all before Waters and his ten- piece band even got started on the centrepiece of the event: a rigorously accurate performance in its entirety of Dark Side of the Moon.

Waters began touring this show in June 2006, and the O2 Arena presentation was essentially the same as the one he put on in Hyde Park that year. Having taken it around the world since then, the man who has taken to billing himself as “the creative genius of Pink Floyd” has clearly gone a long way towards reclaiming custody of these songs.

And what a magnificent body of work it still is. With the aid of some crack musicians, including three guitarists who between them just about covered for David Gilmour, Waters returned to a well-trodden path with all the considerable authority and world-weary passion at his disposal. Clocks chimed at the start of Time; the cash registers rang out at the start of Money; trains screeched and a column of commuters trudged to work during Us and Them; and during Brain Damage, brains floated out of soma capsules. While such imagery was stark and simple, the performance was Wagnerian in scale and timeless in its appeal.

If the show was primarily an archaeological dig, the treasures unearthed were real enough. Only a couple of Waters's solo songs made the cut: a bombastic Perfect Sense, during which an inflatable astronaut drifted over the crowd, together with one “newish” piece called Leaving Beirut, an unbelievably clumsy and condescending cultural polemic which stuck out in the concert like an unfortunate stain on the carpet.

Edited by The Rover
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Ok I don't believe in mixing Floyd albums..I think Animals and The Final Cut should stay as is..listen to as a whole..such as it depends on your mood..which is why both albums are so damn underrated!

Peter Grant felt the same way with the Zeppelin albums. And IMO that's how the Floyd albums should be..

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was the last Floyd I purchased because it had a '81 version of Money (which was decent) and a re-edited version of SOYCD. But as a whole it just didn't flow at all. Perhaps Pigs on the wing (parts 1 & 2) to end the album would have been nice..or including "Bitter Love." But I can see why Roger Waters was against the release of the album. Floyd should be about their music..album to album..not their "greatest hits!" At the time I'm sure fans were expecting more than just a compilation album. Especially after the success of The Wall..just a release to please the record company..

DSOTM and WYWH were the band's masterpieces as a whole..Animals, The Wall and the Final Cut IMO are much better listens than Gilmour-led AMLOR and TDB. They're all just more focused and more balanced. Musically, TFC does not have it. However, what it does have is feeling and compassion..the most dramatic album i've ever listened to even though i can't relate to the whole concept..Waters was able to put feeling onto the record which didn't sound like "just another rock album." Musically, if Waters/Gilmour had still been on speaking terms then i think it would have been very good beyond just "underground floyd."

Gilmor-led Floyd seems to be more about music..Very good music..but with no start or no finish. Hell, Meddle was better than these albums. The instrumentals are great, of course, on both albums..but what's missing is the compassionate vocals of Waters instead of the pop/radio-friendly voice of Gilmour. I love them both, but Water's voice put more distinction on the band than any of the other members....same as Plant with Zeppelin..If DSOTM had sounded vocally the same as Animals or the Wall, I don't think the impact would have been the same. And TFC, being all Waters sung, was a plus in my book.

Oh well this is a Zeppelin forum. So if anyone can direct me to an official Floyd forum hit me up with some links..

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I would say it's even more critical to listen to each Floyd album in their original form, than the original Zeppelin albums. No way I can listen to any one song off of Animals, for example, without hearing all the rest. I don't post on any other forums, at this time. I did visit a Floyd forum a few years ago, and found the black background / white text totally unreadable to my eyes on this computer screen. Not sure if that's changeable?

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:wtf: Glastonbury turns down Dave Gilmour .... ?

The story on Planet Rock tonight (Nicky Horne show) is that dave approached Glastonbury and offered to play - and basically, they (politely) told him NO THANKS (apparently they want to appeal to a 'younger audience', and don't feel he would be useful in that respect.

It begs the question - do they even know who DG is ? And can there be any atom of respect due for Glastonbury any more ?

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:wtf: Glastonbury turns down Dave Gilmour .... ?

The story on Planet Rock tonight (Nicky Horne show) is that dave approached Glastonbury and offered to play - and basically, they (politely) told him NO THANKS (apparently they want to appeal to a 'younger audience', and don't feel he would be useful in that respect.

It begs the question - do they even know who DG is ? And can there be any atom of respect due for Glastonbury any more ?

Yeah, that's being reported all over the place. What idiots.

On a better note, Gilmour was quoted as saying more Floyd shows aren't out of the question...

Pink Floyd star DAVID GILMOUR has hinted the legendary band could reform for more gigs - despite refuting reports of a full comeback last year.

The English musician reunited Pink Floyd for a one-off charity show for Live8 in 2005, but insisted he was too "happy on his own" to get back with his bandmates.

But now Gilmour admits he hasn't completely ruled out performing with Rick Wright, Nick Mason and former singer Roger Waters again - it just won't be in the near future.

He tells BBC 6Music, "Who knows? Who knows the future? I haven't absolutely said 'no' to the possibility, but I think that in reality any sort of long-term thing together is not going to happen."

And the 62-year-old claims his years of rocking have earned him the right to take life at a slower pace: "At my incredibly advantaged age - having achieved this - I've earned the right to sit on my ass for a little while and consider what to do next."

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Yeah, that's being reported all over the place. What idiots.

On a better note, Gilmour was quoted as saying more Floyd shows aren't out of the question...

Pink Floyd star DAVID GILMOUR has hinted the legendary band could reform for more gigs - despite refuting reports of a full comeback last year.

The English musician reunited Pink Floyd for a one-off charity show for Live8 in 2005, but insisted he was too "happy on his own" to get back with his bandmates.

But now Gilmour admits he hasn't completely ruled out performing with Rick Wright, Nick Mason and former singer Roger Waters again - it just won't be in the near future.

He tells BBC 6Music, "Who knows? Who knows the future? I haven't absolutely said 'no' to the possibility, but I think that in reality any sort of long-term thing together is not going to happen."

And the 62-year-old claims his years of rocking have earned him the right to take life at a slower pace: "At my incredibly advantaged age - having achieved this - I've earned the right to sit on my ass for a little while and consider what to do next."

And the 62-year-old claims his years of rocking have earned him the right to take life at a slower pace: "At my incredibly advantaged age - having achieved this - I've earned the right to sit on my ass for a little while and consider what to do next."

I agree with Guilmour. I can't realy see Waters and Gilmour together again.

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No, they definitely are not going to record, or do any long tours together. Gilmour just doesn't want or need the aggravation. Some one-off gigs are possible, though, but that's probably it.

Exactly

Realy is sad, but I like almost all the David Guilmore job. About Roger Waters, can't say that isn't good, but I don't like it...

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