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SHINE A LIGHT


Del Zeppnile

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Anybody else seen this film yet?

I have seen most of it and all I can say is don't expect another Last Waltz this time from this last Scorsese attempt. The film is wonderfully filmed and directed as we would expect. But in the end it's just more of the same Stones performances that we have seen a million times. The best part is the performance with Buddy Guy.

Maybe I would have enjoyed it more if it had actually had been a "Last Waltz" by the Stones. But then they would have needed to have done it 25 years ago to have had the same impact as the swan song for The Band in Scoresese's other film.

I hope Led Zeppelin never agrees to do anything like this. It's really kind of sad in my opinion. The Who's Amazing Journey was much better... and without as big of a name director las Scorsese. Although I really enjoyed the documentary he did on Bob Dylan in No Direction Home.

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I just wish they would release "Ladys and Gentalmen; The Rolling Stones" on DVD. It would be perfect for surround sound. I saw it in a theatre in 1974 with quad sound. I sat through it four times in one day.

DanArmstrong3.jpg

That's the best Stones show I've ever seen. I saw it in the theatres too. :D

And there IS a great boot DVD of it, in great quality. Sound is terrific.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Keith Richards talks rock doc

By LIZ BRAUN -- Sun Media

rolling_richards_keith256.jpg

Keith Richards perma-smiling at a gala red carpet walk-in?

Keith Richards?! Hard to picture.

"People have been pointing cameras at me! I've had more red carpets in the last year than you'd believe," the legendary Rolling Stones guitarist says with mock exasperation, in an exclusive Canadian interview with Sun Media, while summing up promo activities for Shine A Light.

Shine A Light is the performance film for every Rolling Stones fan who never got to have front-row seats. It opens in theatres on Friday.

Directed by Martin Scorsese and filmed by a Who's Who of famous cinematographers, Shine A Light is an unusually intimate concert movie that captures the Stones over two nights at New York's Beacon Theatre.

The show is all about performance and energy, and includes guest appearances from Christina Aguilera, Jack White (of the White Stripes) and legendary bluesman Buddy Guy. What it doesn't include are the visually irritating, razzle-dazzle cuts and camera work so beloved by the music video world. As Stones' drummer Charlie Watts has so succinctly said of Shine A Light, "It's not boring."

In the film, Scorsese has interspersed the concert footage with snippets of old interviews and some archival footage, and his choices are judicious; in the midst of the "hope I die before I get old" ethos of 40 years ago, here's a young Mick Jagger being asked if the Rolling Stones might still be performing and touring when the band members are in their 60s.

"Yes," says Jagger, without hesitation.

The shows at the Beacon were filmed in autumn 2006, when the band was in the midst of the 144-date Bigger Bang world tour.

Over the phone from a holiday in the tropics ("I'm just gettin' my things out of the sun, which is more than you can do in Toronto, darlin', " he says, laughing), Richards says that being part of Shine A Light "is another side of life. I'm a guitar player. I write a few songs, I play guitar," he says in understatement, "but this is a whole other side of the affair, of entertainment. I'm trying to get the hang of it. It's weird. I did (long-ago Stones documentaries) Gimme Shelter and C---sucker Blues -- no problem," he rambles, laughing. "The only other movie was the pirate thing, which was a shot in the dark, but here we're dealing with the movie business and the way they operate, and it's quite different."

Aside from "the pirate thing" -- his cameo as Captain Teague in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End -- Richards and the rest of the Stones in fact are documentary veterans. There are more than 18 such films about the band, several by leading directors, including the rarely seen C---sucker Blues, (from Robert Frank), which outlined the whole sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll life on the road. The Maysles Brothers made Gimme Shelter, Hal Ashby directed Let's Spend the Night Together, and in 1968, Jean-Luc Godard featured the band in Sympathy For the Devil. Richards was also a part of Taylor Hackford's Chuck Berry documentary, Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll; like that film, says the guitarist, Shine A Light is a superior rock movie. Did we need another Stones movie? Actually, we did.

"We were on the road for about two and a half years," Richards says, "and someone said, 'You know, we're going to have to make a movie about this,' and I was, 'Oh, God, not again,' but then they said that the interesting thing was that Martin Scorsese would be behind the camera. And that makes all the difference! Suddenly you're talking about making film, making cinema, not just documenting something. When I found out it was Martin doing it, I was in like Flynn. And I do mean Errol, darling."

Mind you, Richards says that the last time he saw Scorsese they were together on a private plane, and while everybody else headed off to Los Angeles, Richards was dropped off in Newark. "The last thing Martin saw of me, I was being collared by the cops and dragged off. Which I really thought should have been the ending of the movie. But maybe it's the beginning of the next one."

Something was dodgy with the numbers on Richards' passport, but he soon talked the law into letting him go home. Says Richards, philosophically, "I'm a different kind of guy and I wanted to stay out of Martin's hair as much as possible. Apart from the fact he never bothered to find out if I got out of jail, I love the man."

Does Richards know how Scorsese picked the title, Shine A Light? It's an Exile On Main Street song.

"I do not," says Richards. "I never found out how Her majesty -- Mick -- and Martin arrived at that one, because we don't even play it in the movie. I think it's something to do with shining lights and music, movies, blah blah blah. You're better off asking them. I'm just schlepping around up there with a guitar around my neck. I think Martin thinks it's a good visual title."

Richards saw the finished Shine A Light when it opened the Berlin International Film Festival last month.

"I saw it with an audience there, and I hate looking at myself like that. When you do the shows we do, you're used to cameras pointed at you because there's a video screen behind you and they're documenting every pimple. So it wasn't weird in that respect.

"But the Stones have to be sort of unconscious that you're filming, and I told Martin, 'I think that will be very difficult with Mick. You know what Mick's like, he'll be flim-flamming and putting too much on it, just because he'll know you're shooting.' But Mick got over it."

Scorsese assured Richards he would never see a camera. "And it was a joy to do. He must have had 17 cameras, and I didn't see one."

Richards says he made a suggestion for the soundtrack CD of the movie, but otherwise tried to keep a low profile on the project. Always happy to skewer Mick Jagger and maintain that Glimmer Twins sibling rivalry, Richards says, "Apart from asking Martin, try to stay out of Mick's face as much as possible -- because the more you get into Mick's face, the more makeup goes on -- Martin just wanted to shoot a Stones show ... and I didn't need to know more than that to just do what I do."

Capturing what Richards and the rest of the Stones do on film is hugely complicated, but Scorsese was up to the task. The director has used Stones' music in his movies and for filmic inspiration several times: In Mean Streets, Casino, Raging Bull, Goodfellas and The Departed. (He has used the song Gimme Shelter in three movies -- The Departed, Casino and Goodfellas.)

The Oscar-winning director has talked about the music's drive, authority and edge, and says that even before he became a filmmaker or saw the band in concert, "Their music was an inspiration. The Stones were key in creating images in my imagination, feelings and impressions that found their way into a lot of my movies."

Shine A Light is the latest in Scorsese's body of music movies. He worked as an editor on Woodstock, and directed both The Last Waltz, a film about The Band, and No Direction Home: Bob Dylan.

Richards, meanwhile, was more than happy to learn that the dates at the Beacon Theatre would be filmed. He knows the venue from playing there with his other band, the X-pensive Winos (which, originally, was Richards, Steve Jordan, Bobby Keys, Waddy Wachtel, Sarah Dash, Charley Drayton and Ivan Neville.)

Which reminds him: They might tour again one day.

As for the Stones? Oh, absolutely.

Noting that he's on holiday right now, Richards says that despite having finished up the mammoth Bigger Bang tour fairly recently, he has no doubt the Rolling Stones will tour again.

"At the moment, everybody looks at each other and goes, 'Are you kidding me? F--- off!' But I know I'll get a phone call in a few months," he says, laughing.

"Otherwise, I'm doing the red carpet bit. I found out that there's really only about 100 yards from where you get out of the car to the doorway, but the red carpet is about three miles long because they put curves in it, and then you're led up to it -- you know, there's CNN! And blah, blah!! And it takes half an hour to do 10 yards. That's probably why they paint it red.

"I wrote Paint It, Black," he adds, "but this red s--t is another thing."

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Well I know I am living in the past but I really like the Stones shows from about 72-78 and have purchased several boots .Stones in the Dome 78 terrible quality LA CAL 75 terrible quality have really given up on getting either of those shows in decent quality.They have released so much from the last 20 years and verry little from the good old days of thier prime.

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I've got a pretty good boot of it too. It's in wide screen. It also has a bonus with the same performence of Midnight Rambler In full sceen.

RollingStonesTongeLogo.jpg

There's a better version of "Ladies & Gentlemen" out there in both wide and full screen.

But I wish they had released THAT officially instead of the same old retreads of recent performances. The Stones 1972-73 were nearly unbeatable. Only Zep could stand up to them (and beat them IMO).

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There's a better version of "Ladies & Gentlemen" out there in both wide and full screen.

But I wish they had released THAT officially instead of the same old retreads of recent performances. The Stones 1972-73 were nearly unbeatable. Only Zep could stand up to them (and beat them IMO).

Don't for get about the Who...they were up there with those guys too :D

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This movie has gotten so much news media attention since friday, local morning news had segments on it today still. I saw one review of it yesterday with some negative reactions to jaggers singing and some positive reactions to richards playing.

I guess the stones did the guest spots with christine aguielera and jack white to reach a younger audience/marketing move... wouldnt ever want to see led zep do something like that.

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This movie has gotten so much news media attention since friday, local morning news had segments on it today still. I saw one review of it yesterday with some negative reactions to jaggers singing and some positive reactions to richards playing. I guess the stones did the guest spots with christine aguielera and jack white to reach a younger audience/marketing move... wouldnt ever want to see led zep do something like that.

Jagger has been phoning in the vocals for a while now. The growl and passion in his voice is unfortunately long gone. Keith on the other hand...he was slacking for a while but he seems to actually be getting some of his mojo back. He's singing as good as he ever has.

Appearances ARE deceiving sometimes. B)

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Jagger has been phoning in the vocals for a while now. The growl and passion in his voice is unfortunately long gone. Keith on the other hand...he was slacking for a while but he seems to actually be getting some of his mojo back. He's singing as good as he ever has.

Appearances ARE deceiving sometimes. B)

I think the reviewer actually used the phoning in description for the singing. I liked all the songs with richards singing on the later records, -thief in the night being one. It sort of seems that jagger is trying to keep up with the band with some of the songs that are really clicking in a stones way, like the opening stuff on -bigger bang, or -flip the switch. When it works like it did with -start me up, its great...but when they are trying too hard to make it work, its just really apparent. But they are still good stones songs...dont think they ever throw any songs away.

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I think the reviewer actually used the phoning in description for the singing. I liked all the songs with richards singing on the later records, -thief in the night being one. It sort of seems that jagger is trying to keep up with the band with some of the songs that are really clicking in a stones way, like the opening stuff on -bigger bang, or -flip the switch. When it works like it did with -start me up, its great...but when they are trying too hard to make it work, its just really apparent. But they are still good stones songs...dont think they ever throw any songs away.

Thief In The Night is a great song. Keith took his vocals up a notch or two from his "Main Offender" album on. Jagger just doesn't have the passion anymore. That's why it's pretty hard for me to get too enthusiastic about any newer Stones music.

One of the reasons I think they won't release "Ladies & Gentlemen" officially is because once the public hears that, the later stuff will turn into beer coasters. :lol:

ps. my comment about Keef 'slacking' for a while was a reference to his guitar playing live, not his singing. His sound was getting rather weak for a while, but lately it's toughened up a bit.

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Thief In The Night is a great song. Keith took his vocals up a notch or two from his "Main Offender" album on. Jagger just doesn't have the passion anymore. That's why it's pretty hard for me to get too enthusiastic about any newer Stones music.

One of the reasons I think they won't release "Ladies & Gentlemen" officially is because once the public hears that, the later stuff will turn into beer coasters. :lol:

ps. my comment about Keef 'slacking' for a while was a reference to his guitar playing live, not his singing. His sound was getting rather weak for a while, but lately it's toughened up a bit.

Yeah, was agreeing with you on richard's vocals. With the later records, i listened to -bridges to babylon much more than the latest -a bigger bang... some of the jagger narrative lyrics just dont work on the later, like jagger solo songs with the stones just hanging around.

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Keith_Scorsese.jpg

April 4, 2008

Only Rock ’N’ Roll, but They’re Still at It

By STEPHEN HOLDEN

Published: April 4, 2008

As you scrutinize the aging bodies of the Rolling Stones in Martin Scorsese’s rip-roaring concert documentary “Shine a Light,” there is ample evidence that rock ’n’ roll may hold the secret of eternal vitality, if not eternal beauty.

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, the quartet’s three skinny members, certainly look their ages. But there is nothing stodgy about them. The strenuous rock ’n’ roll life has left them sinewy and lean, like longtime marathon runners. (The staid, above-it-all drummer, Charlie Watts, is the exception.)

Mr. Jagger’s lined face, with its deflated balloon lips, suggests a double exposure of Dorian Gray and his infamous portrait, at once defiantly youthful and creepily gaunt. The simian Mr. Richards, whose upper arm flesh has shriveled, resembles an old madam chewing over her secrets. As he plays, his lips dangling a cigarette, he leans back into his snarling guitar and a joyful grin spreads across his face. He could be the world’s happiest young older man: Peter Pan as a wizened Gypsy fortuneteller.

For the Rolling Stones appear supremely alive inside their giant, self-created rock ’n’ roll machine. The sheer pleasure of making music that keens and growls like a pack of ravenous alley cats is obviously what keeps them going. Why should they ever stop? At the heart of the gizmo, Mr. Jagger whirls, leaps, struts, wiggles his tiny hips and sashays around like an androgynous tart prowling a street corner at 3 a.m.

Ultimately the movie is Mr. Jagger’s show. If his long-running circus act is ridiculous when you analyze it, conjoined to the Stones’ music, it becomes a phenomenal high-wire exhibition of agility, stamina and cheek. He was 63 when the concert was filmed over two nights at the Beacon Theater in New York in the fall of 2006. From certain angles, when the blazing lights hit his face, he suggests an agitated zombie with a full head of hair. But if you squint until your vision blurs, he is the same tireless, taunting cock of the walk that he has always been.

The film, which used 18 cameras, many operated by eminent cinematographers, is an unabashedly reverent tribute to the Stones made in the same spirit as “The Last Waltz,” Mr. Scorsese’s elegiac 1978 movie of the Band’s farewell concert, and his more recent Bob Dylan biography, “No Direction Home.” That said, it is far less ambitious, and less overtly romantic.

This is a concert film with frills that places you on the stage with the band and, with a finely trained eye, observes the musicians’ interactions with one another and with the audience. The visual rhythms and unobtrusive editing reflect the contradictory status of the Stones as a majestic rock institution and a gang of down-and-dirty bad boys thumbing their noses at propriety while scooping up all the girls.

Although there is no frantic cutting back and forth, the cameras are continually on the move. As the movie artfully shifts its gaze, it helps you see much more than you could if you actually attended the concert. The audience is largely ignored.

Mr. Scorsese is a besotted rock ’n’ roll fan who wholeheartedly embraces its mythology. Its scruffy guitar heroes and roustabout rebel-prophets are the musical equivalents of the hotheads and outlaws who populate so many of his films. Almost every shot of “Shine a Light” conveys his excitement.

Prefaced by preconcert footage and interwoven with excerpts from television interviews from the Stones’ younger days, going back to 1964, “Shine a Light” makes no attempt to explain the Stones or to tell their story. All it wants to do is to give you the best seat in the house and the best sound you could possibly hope for.

The program is a best-of selection that concentrates on Stones classics, including “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” “Shattered,” “Some Girls,” “Tumbling Dice,” “Sympathy for the Devil,” “Start Me Up” and “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” The only misfire is the quaint, quasi chamber-pop ballad “As Tears Go By,” a hit for Marianne Faithfull in 1964, which sounds incongruous in Mr. Jagger’s parched delivery. Otherwise, the full-tilt rock concert roars along like a steam engine. A horn section, a keyboardist (Chuck Leavell), a bass guitarist (Darryl Jones) and three backup singers augment the band.

There are three special guests: in ascending order of interest, Jack White, who trades vocals with Mr. Jagger on “Loving Cup”; Christina Aguilera, who shares the vocals on “Live With Me” and bestows demure pecks on the cheek to the musicians as she leaves the stage; and the great blues guitarist and singer Buddy Guy performing an old Muddy Waters song, “Champagne and Reefer.” (There is also the Clinton family in the audience, on hand to celebrate Bill Clinton’s 60th birthday.)

Like Muddy Waters, whom I saw in the Beacon Theater shortly before his death in 1983 at 70, Mr. Guy, 70 when “Shine a Light” was filmed, is a mighty blues presence, one who puts the Stones in historical perspective. Muddy Waters was an ominous force of raw blues aggression. Mr. Guy, though equally imposing, is a more benign, patriarchal figure.

Beside him, Mr. Jagger and company are mischievous bohemian whippersnappers churning up variations on their elders’ musical bedrock. It is obviously a thrilling game to play into your 60s and beyond, if you’ve still got the juice. And the Stones have the juice. But it is ultimately just a game.

Trailer: http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/379050/Shi...-Light/trailers

“Shine a Light” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned) for drug references in the songs, and smoking.

SHINE A LIGHT

Opens on Friday nationwide.

Directed by Martin Scorsese; director of photography, Robert Richardson; edited by David Tedeschi; music by the Rolling Stones; produced by Victoria Pearman, Michael Cohl, Zane Weiner and Steve Bing; released by Paramount Pictures. Running time: 2 hours 2 minutes.

http://movies.nytimes.com/2008/04/04/movies/04shin.html?8dpc

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Keith Richards talks rock doc

By LIZ BRAUN -- Sun Media

rolling_richards_keith256.jpg

Keith Richards perma-smiling at a gala red carpet walk-in?

Keith Richards?! Hard to picture.

"People have been pointing cameras at me! I've had more red carpets in the last year than you'd believe," the legendary Rolling Stones guitarist says with mock exasperation, in an exclusive Canadian interview with Sun Media, while summing up promo activities for Shine A Light.

Shine A Light is the performance film for every Rolling Stones fan who never got to have front-row seats. It opens in theatres on Friday.

Directed by Martin Scorsese and filmed by a Who's Who of famous cinematographers, Shine A Light is an unusually intimate concert movie that captures the Stones over two nights at New York's Beacon Theatre.

The show is all about performance and energy, and includes guest appearances from Christina Aguilera, Jack White (of the White Stripes) and legendary bluesman Buddy Guy. What it doesn't include are the visually irritating, razzle-dazzle cuts and camera work so beloved by the music video world. As Stones' drummer Charlie Watts has so succinctly said of Shine A Light, "It's not boring."

In the film, Scorsese has interspersed the concert footage with snippets of old interviews and some archival footage, and his choices are judicious; in the midst of the "hope I die before I get old" ethos of 40 years ago, here's a young Mick Jagger being asked if the Rolling Stones might still be performing and touring when the band members are in their 60s.

"Yes," says Jagger, without hesitation.

The shows at the Beacon were filmed in autumn 2006, when the band was in the midst of the 144-date Bigger Bang world tour.

Over the phone from a holiday in the tropics ("I'm just gettin' my things out of the sun, which is more than you can do in Toronto, darlin', " he says, laughing), Richards says that being part of Shine A Light "is another side of life. I'm a guitar player. I write a few songs, I play guitar," he says in understatement, "but this is a whole other side of the affair, of entertainment. I'm trying to get the hang of it. It's weird. I did (long-ago Stones documentaries) Gimme Shelter and C---sucker Blues -- no problem," he rambles, laughing. "The only other movie was the pirate thing, which was a shot in the dark, but here we're dealing with the movie business and the way they operate, and it's quite different."

Aside from "the pirate thing" -- his cameo as Captain Teague in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End -- Richards and the rest of the Stones in fact are documentary veterans. There are more than 18 such films about the band, several by leading directors, including the rarely seen C---sucker Blues, (from Robert Frank), which outlined the whole sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll life on the road. The Maysles Brothers made Gimme Shelter, Hal Ashby directed Let's Spend the Night Together, and in 1968, Jean-Luc Godard featured the band in Sympathy For the Devil. Richards was also a part of Taylor Hackford's Chuck Berry documentary, Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll; like that film, says the guitarist, Shine A Light is a superior rock movie. Did we need another Stones movie? Actually, we did.

"We were on the road for about two and a half years," Richards says, "and someone said, 'You know, we're going to have to make a movie about this,' and I was, 'Oh, God, not again,' but then they said that the interesting thing was that Martin Scorsese would be behind the camera. And that makes all the difference! Suddenly you're talking about making film, making cinema, not just documenting something. When I found out it was Martin doing it, I was in like Flynn. And I do mean Errol, darling."

Mind you, Richards says that the last time he saw Scorsese they were together on a private plane, and while everybody else headed off to Los Angeles, Richards was dropped off in Newark. "The last thing Martin saw of me, I was being collared by the cops and dragged off. Which I really thought should have been the ending of the movie. But maybe it's the beginning of the next one."

Something was dodgy with the numbers on Richards' passport, but he soon talked the law into letting him go home. Says Richards, philosophically, "I'm a different kind of guy and I wanted to stay out of Martin's hair as much as possible. Apart from the fact he never bothered to find out if I got out of jail, I love the man."

Does Richards know how Scorsese picked the title, Shine A Light? It's an Exile On Main Street song.

"I do not," says Richards. "I never found out how Her majesty -- Mick -- and Martin arrived at that one, because we don't even play it in the movie. I think it's something to do with shining lights and music, movies, blah blah blah. You're better off asking them. I'm just schlepping around up there with a guitar around my neck. I think Martin thinks it's a good visual title."

Richards saw the finished Shine A Light when it opened the Berlin International Film Festival last month.

"I saw it with an audience there, and I hate looking at myself like that. When you do the shows we do, you're used to cameras pointed at you because there's a video screen behind you and they're documenting every pimple. So it wasn't weird in that respect.

"But the Stones have to be sort of unconscious that you're filming, and I told Martin, 'I think that will be very difficult with Mick. You know what Mick's like, he'll be flim-flamming and putting too much on it, just because he'll know you're shooting.' But Mick got over it."

Scorsese assured Richards he would never see a camera. "And it was a joy to do. He must have had 17 cameras, and I didn't see one."

Richards says he made a suggestion for the soundtrack CD of the movie, but otherwise tried to keep a low profile on the project. Always happy to skewer Mick Jagger and maintain that Glimmer Twins sibling rivalry, Richards says, "Apart from asking Martin, try to stay out of Mick's face as much as possible -- because the more you get into Mick's face, the more makeup goes on -- Martin just wanted to shoot a Stones show ... and I didn't need to know more than that to just do what I do."

Capturing what Richards and the rest of the Stones do on film is hugely complicated, but Scorsese was up to the task. The director has used Stones' music in his movies and for filmic inspiration several times: In Mean Streets, Casino, Raging Bull, Goodfellas and The Departed. (He has used the song Gimme Shelter in three movies -- The Departed, Casino and Goodfellas.)

The Oscar-winning director has talked about the music's drive, authority and edge, and says that even before he became a filmmaker or saw the band in concert, "Their music was an inspiration. The Stones were key in creating images in my imagination, feelings and impressions that found their way into a lot of my movies."

Shine A Light is the latest in Scorsese's body of music movies. He worked as an editor on Woodstock, and directed both The Last Waltz, a film about The Band, and No Direction Home: Bob Dylan.

Richards, meanwhile, was more than happy to learn that the dates at the Beacon Theatre would be filmed. He knows the venue from playing there with his other band, the X-pensive Winos (which, originally, was Richards, Steve Jordan, Bobby Keys, Waddy Wachtel, Sarah Dash, Charley Drayton and Ivan Neville.)

Which reminds him: They might tour again one day.

As for the Stones? Oh, absolutely.

Noting that he's on holiday right now, Richards says that despite having finished up the mammoth Bigger Bang tour fairly recently, he has no doubt the Rolling Stones will tour again.

"At the moment, everybody looks at each other and goes, 'Are you kidding me? F--- off!' But I know I'll get a phone call in a few months," he says, laughing.

"Otherwise, I'm doing the red carpet bit. I found out that there's really only about 100 yards from where you get out of the car to the doorway, but the red carpet is about three miles long because they put curves in it, and then you're led up to it -- you know, there's CNN! And blah, blah!! And it takes half an hour to do 10 yards. That's probably why they paint it red.

"I wrote Paint It, Black," he adds, "but this red s--t is another thing."

Keith's face seems to translate into "GENIUS"! :)

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On Dec. 10, 1991, I seen a Rolling Stones IMAX movie at The Beacon Theater in NYC. I thought it very good, but can't remember the years of the footage. Guess would be late 80's early 90's.

"Live At The Max". This was from the 1989 Steel Wheels tour. I also believe there may have been a couple of clips from early '90 as well. Nice show.

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