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Jimmy Page in 1976


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Still, I always was a "Creem" man myself...best rock mag of the 70's! But I always found time to also read Circus, Crawdaddy, Trouser Press, Rock, Audio, Zig Zag, NME and Melody Maker.

Rolling Stone(with the exception of Hunter S. Thompson's articles) was good for wiping your ass or house training your puppy.

Yes, CREEM was the best read among the lot of them. Good articles that would not sugar-coat things as much as other mags (ahem, cough, cough ... drug use).

Plus, their photo captions were often hilarious!! For example, during CREEM's review of the Knebworth shows in '79, under a photo of Robert Plant, it read:

"I used to be a god. Now I sell hot dogs."

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LOL! Creem's photo captions ruled!

Feed him cookies and he'll follow you anywhere!

Caption under photo of Jimmy getting off Knebworth helicopter behing Charlotte/Patricia (?).

And the "Jimmy's sister" captions! :hysterical:

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File0725.jpg;)

Man, I remember that one, too!!

Humbert Humbert, of course, being from that book by Nabakov, "Lolita," about a young school girl.

Funny shot of Jimmy!

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While the form was maybe different from what he seems to be talking about I'd say he was pretty accurate that songwritting would take over from the established styles of the previous few years.

I'v always had the impression that it was the inital "blast" of punk in 77-78 that caught the rock establishment off guard, I don't think they anticipated rock being so caught up in the social/political troubles of the time. What followed afterwards does seem to fit more closely into what Page was mentioning, Public Image Ltd, Joy Division, Talking Heads etc building up walls of sound with ethnic influences.

I disagree totally with you here! :D Anything PIL, Joy Division and Talking Heads did was quite simple in terms of songwriting and arrangements when you compare it with what Jimmy probably had in mind in the 1976 interview. For Jimmy himself, it was guitar orchestration, but he's talking about a trend that had been obvious in the early to mid 1970's - and he seems to have expected it to go on. The complexity of arrangement, and indeed of songwriting itself, had been increasing very notably. You can hear this in a pop group like 10 cc (How Dare You? 1975), in Joni Mitchell's work (Court and Spark, 1974), on Queen's A Night at the Opera (1975), just to give three very different examples. Of course, this didn't evaporate completely right away when punk exploded on the scene - there are examples like Gerry Rafferty's City to City (1978). But on the whole Jimmy's anticipations weren't borne out.

Yeah Levee, he talked about The Damned several times, and loved their energy. Robert also talked about them at the time. I can find some of the exact references if anyone's interested.

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