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RockAction's Fishing Thread!


Rock Action

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In short, most Californian great white shark victims survive. Most Australian great white shark victims do not survive and a high percentage are actually eaten, particularly these last 20 years starting with Shirley Durdin in 1985. :o

The most incredible white shark attack I've ever seen happened at Jeffrey's Bay, South Africa. Kid survived two sharks ripping him from the curl.

J-Bay Shark Attack

Another grisly filmed shark attack occured during the filming of a Discovery Channel special for "Shark Week" a few years back involving a cameraman for the show and a hungry bull shark. Marine biologists were attempting to prove that bull sharks will not attack unprovoked or "ie" if they don't indicate a reason to attack. The biologists were out to prove that if a human could maintain a steady, calm and relaxed heartrate, the sharks would be less inclined to attack and hopefully would be less aggressive. Bull sharks mind you have more testastorone than any other living creature on the planet. They even put raw meat under their bare feet to show how daring (or stupid) they were willing to be. Despite a slip and an attack on the cameraman who later claimed he was terrified the whole time, the bulls did not attack any of the biologists. Rather, they only consumed the raw meat and left the remaining humans alone. Crazy? Hell yes. Intriguing? You Bet.

Bull Shark Attack

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Lots of great whites around the Farralon Islands off San Francisco. They call the area the 'Red Triangle'

Yes, the Red Triangle area of California has the highest number of great white shark attacks of any area in the world. :o

Interestingly enough, in decades gone by there were comparatively few great white shark attacks off California, especially when pinniped numbers were low. Since the Marine Mammal Protection Act came around in the early 1970s, seals and sea lions numbers in California have increased dramatically. So have great white shark attacks on humans. Before the 1970s, the elephant seal population got down to only a couple thousand. Now there are hundreds of thousands of elephant seals.

Even the Farralon Islands didn't see many great white sharks prior to the 1960/1970s. Plenty of people used to dive for abalone there before a spate of attacks in the 1960s. Since then, their numbers around the Farralon Island (due to the increase in the pinniped populations there) has been a much more regular occurence.

but they mostly eat seals.

Yes, and rarely eat humans in California. Out of the 100 plus recorded great white shark attacks there, you can count the number of total consumption cases on one hand. Last known total consumption case in California was 1959. Even those victims that have been killed and the bodies left floating without being recovered for days (such as Lewis Boren, Tamara McCallister and Randal Fry), they were not eaten.

As I said, it's a different story in Australia. Though Australia has fewer great white attacks, more of the victims are actually eaten. :unsure:

One time when I was a kid I saw 2 great whites on a fish cart at Fisherman's Wharf. They were frozen solid and had all kinds of bullet holes in them. Back then it didn't seem to matter. :unsure:

No, it didn't back then. Times change though, thankfully. :)

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The most incredible white shark attack I've ever seen happened at Jeffrey's Bay, South Africa. Kid survived two sharks ripping him from the curl.

J-Bay Shark Attack

Luckily for him, his surfboard bore the brunt of the attack and seemed to be the main target. He only had minor injuries to his hand.

Another grisly filmed shark attack occured during the filming of a Discovery Channel special for "Shark Week" a few years back involving a cameraman for the show and a hungry bull shark. Marine biologists were attempting to prove that bull sharks will not attack unprovoked or "ie" if they don't indicate a reason to attack. The biologists were out to prove that if a human could maintain a steady, calm and relaxed heartrate, the sharks would be less inclined to attack and hopefully would be less aggressive. Bull sharks mind you have more testastorone than any other living creature on the planet. They even put raw meat under their bare feet to show how daring (or stupid) they were willing to be. Despite a slip and an attack on the cameraman who later claimed he was terrified the whole time, the bulls did not attack any of the biologists. Rather, they only consumed the raw meat and left the remaining humans alone. Crazy? Hell yes. Intriguing? You Bet.

Bull Shark Attack

Yes, Eric Ritter. He had been doing that experiment for years with no mishaps and I have seen other pieces of footage where he did the same thing with nothing going wrong. Law of averages I'd say. If you are going to deliberately put yourself in the way of dozens of bull sharks time and time again then sooner or later something will go wrong. The trick is to quit while you are ahead. :D

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We've got nice sized white sharks off our coast in New Jersey. A charter boat captain I know said he spotted a 16-18ft white off Barnegat Inlet about 4 years ago while chumming for blues.

I don't know if I'd rather be eaten by a Great White or a school of Blues.

I've watched how Blues go on a feeding frenzy and with the teeth they have, LOOK OUT if you're in the water! The water looks like a boil when they go off. The piranha of the ocean.

bluef.gif

Wow, this guy sees it like I do. :D

The Bluefish

The Bluefish is a very efficient killing machine , very strong and powerful , flexible jaws ( hinged in front ) like a shark, ( can take thin bites or wide bites ) and very sharp teeth top and bottom. ( Ask me I've Been BITTEN!! ). He ranges from the Carolina to Maine . He's designed to take chunks out of his prey , large ones can bite another bluefish in half ( I have had a or what was a 5lb. blue chopped in half while reeling him in)

Their feeding frenzy is a unbelievable sight to see, the water boils with blues attacking a school of minnows or menhaden ( I once saw a school of blues about 2 miles long by about 1/2 wide and the water boiling and loosing ever plug and wire leader on board to that feeding frenzy).

gallery14.jpg

Don't go near the water!

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We've got nice sized white sharks off our coast in New Jersey. A charter boat captain I know said he spotted a 16-18ft white off Barnegat Inlet about 4 years ago while chumming for blues.

Here ya go. Nice old pic from New Jersey in the 1920s. Great white in that length range.

sizeunknown.CaughtoffNewJersey1928.jpg

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One time I was fishing with my brother Larry at Lake Merced in San Francisco. I was about 10 or so and I so loved getting up at 5 AM and we'd catch the bus out to the lake. It was stocked with trout and we'd stay all day til we got our limit (5 each).

Well, one day we were both sitting on the bank and I was day dreaming when all of a sudden I see my brother react and he had been watching a rat in the bushes and it began to walk right in front of him and my brother was so fast that he smothered the rat under his shoe. I couldn't believe it and I was thinking that my brother was praying that I wouldn't move to spook it and I guess I was day dreaming at just the right time. :D

You dirty rat!!

B)

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Here ya go. Nice old pic from New Jersey in the 1920s. Great white in that length range.

sizeunknown.CaughtoffNewJersey1928.jpg

SchleisserandShark.jpg

The "Infamous" Jersey Man Eater from the New Jersey Shore Attacks of 1916. Although its widely been regarded that multiple sharks were involved, this 12ft great white shark was caught at the mouth of the Manasquan River with 10pds of human remains in its stomach. A bull shark is most likely the culprit with the 3 attacks up the Manasquan River as they are the only aggressive sharks that can swim from salt to fresh water.

I work and swim every single morning on the very beach the first attack of that episode took place. The Engleside Hotel, where the man was brought and bled to death after the attack, is no longer there. However, the scene in the movie "Jaws" where the man is having a catch with his dog in the water is based off what actually happened off Engleside Ave. on July 1st, 1916, except the dog and the man both died.

Edited to Add: And I still see sharks off that beach every summer. Big ones, small ones, dark ones, brown ones, hungry ones.

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I'm getting ready to watch the 30th anniversary DVD of JAWS!

B)

I'll never forgive Spielberg for adding the deleted scenes to the Remastered version and not keeping the original cut. They're deleted scenes for a reason. You have one of the greatest introductions to a character in cinema history completely demolished by a weaker cut of him walking into a music store to buy piano wire and mock some stoop with a recorder.

Verna Fields is rolling in her grave.

Btw, I'm still on the hunt for the original VHS version with the "original" theatre version. He even changed the sounds of the rifle shots. Lame.

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I'll never forgive Spielberg for adding the deleted scenes to the Remastered version and not keeping the original cut. They're deleted scenes for a reason. You have one of the greatest introductions to a character in cinema history completely demolished by a weaker cut of him walking into a music store to buy piano wire and mock some stoop with a recorder.

Verna Fields is rolling in her grave.

I don't understand why they even showed the deleted scenes (to sell more DVD's).

I fast forwarded through them.

He even changed the sounds of the rifle shots. Lame.

More firearms paranoia.

<_<

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I don't know if I'd rather be eaten by a Great White or a school of Blues.

I've watched how Blues go on a feeding frenzy and with the teeth they have, LOOK OUT if you're in the water! The water looks like a boil when they go off. The piranha of the ocean.

bluef.gif

Wow, this guy sees it like I do. :D

The Bluefish

The Bluefish is a very efficient killing machine , very strong and powerful , flexible jaws ( hinged in front ) like a shark, ( can take thin bites or wide bites ) and very sharp teeth top and bottom. ( Ask me I've Been BITTEN!! ). He ranges from the Carolina to Maine . He's designed to take chunks out of his prey , large ones can bite another bluefish in half ( I have had a or what was a 5lb. blue chopped in half while reeling him in)

Their feeding frenzy is a unbelievable sight to see, the water boils with blues attacking a school of minnows or menhaden ( I once saw a school of blues about 2 miles long by about 1/2 wide and the water boiling and loosing ever plug and wire leader on board to that feeding frenzy).

gallery14.jpg

Don't go near the water!

The piranha of the ocean without a doubt! We used to find bunker that way, looking for the bluefish feeding frenzies and then snag live bunker. The toughest fighting fish there is, we always called them crocodiles when they get big, because even a moderate size bluefish fights more than any other fish. Even when you get them in the boat and when most other fish would be exhausted, they still have bursts of energy, my dad got hooked in his hand trying to unhook a bluefish once, stainless treble hook...had to go to the hospitol to get it out.

From watching the nature shows, when they cover an animals head/eyes when they handle or transport them, like steve irwin did with crocodiles too. I actually started taking an old rag or old tshirt out fishing. Would wet the tshirt and throw it over a fish in the boat and the fish goes calm instantly. Then, while keeping the eyes of the fish covered you can unhook the fish better, its easier on the fish and ofcourse much easier for you. Its good with all fish too and especially with catch and release, fish gets much less stressed out.

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Big stripers often run with the blues too. I like to eat bluefish even though they're very fishy, very oiley. It's excellent smoked.

I'd have to say it's about the most exciting fishing I've ever done.

Yeah, the stripers and weakfish are usually under the bluefish feeding frenzies. So we'd snag the bunker and level line them with sinkers, but sometimes your catching blues on the snagged bunker before you even get them back to the boat and unhooking a stainless treble hook out of a bluefish is a bitch. The small bluefish arent as oily, plus you can cut out that oily darker meat. With snappers we usually always catch and release though, because there were always so many, it was just fun to be out fishing and catching constant fish. Sadly fishing is not that same as it used to be though. When i heard that folks were fileting and eating sea robin tails, that was a sign of how bad fishing in the bay has become.

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  • 2 weeks later...

When i was a little kid, we were fishing for stripers and weakfish and my dad was teaching us how to fish with a level line reel. I had my thumb on the reel and suddenly it was spinning and i didnt lock the reel. I had a birds nest and it took awhile for my dad to get it untangled, but when i was reeling the line in and had a 13 pound weakfish on there....i was suddenly like, get the net!!!!

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