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You have got to read this drivel


Zepaholic

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Physical Graffiti (1975)

- You look up "wretched excess" in the dictionary, and there's a picture of this double album. The songs go on, and on, and on... "Kashmir" was in fact the inspiration for Philip Glass. (Okay, I made that part up... but the songs do go on, and on, and on.) Many of the tracks are outtakes from earlier albums, and some are excellent (the instrumental "Bron-Yr-Aur" is tuneful and remarkably terse; "Custard Pie" is mindless fun). There are lots of bright moments - "The Rover" has a cool riff, and "Trampled Underfoot" is a listenable ripoff of Stevie Wonder's "Superstition" - but there's too much filler in between. (DBW)

- He's right: "Kashmir" is an unlistenable disaster, and eleven minute escapades with boring chord progressions like "In My Time Of Dying" can't be salvaged by any amount of guitar heroics. But a lot of the other tracks do demonstrate significant stylistic variety and substantial amusement value - solid rock songs like "Houses Of The Holy," a reject from the LP of that name; nice acoustic numbers ("Bron-Yr-Aur"; "Black Country Woman"); standard, reasonable-length Zep epics ("Ten Years Gone"); etc. If Page had just cut it to a single LP, it would have been a high point in the band's career. (JA)

What, does Dave Marsh have siblings who also pretend to be journalists?

Link: http://www.warr.org/zep.html

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Little does the "critic" know that "Trampled Underfoot" was based on another blues song (written well before Stevie Wonder's "Superstition" and too many other areas regarding their wonderful album, Physical Graffiti.

R B)

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I agree there were just too many songs. If some of the outtakes from other albums were taken out the album would've been better.

1. IMTOD

2. Trampled Underfoot

3. The Rover

4. Houses of the Holy

5. Kashmir

6. Ten Years Gone

7. Bron-Yr-Aur

The album is still good though.

What about "Boogie with stu"

Had a pretty cool beat to it.

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Little does the "critic" know that "Trampled Underfoot" was based on another blues song (written well before Stevie Wonder's "Superstition" and too many other areas regarding their wonderful album, Physical Graffiti.

R B)

The lyrical content for Trampled Underfoot was based on Robert Johnson's "Terraplane Blues", but the music is a virtual straight lift from Stevie Wonder's "Superstition."

I assure you Terraplane Blues sounds nothing like Trampled Underfoot.

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Physical Graffiti (1975)

- You look up "wretched excess" in the dictionary, and there's a picture of this double album. The songs go on, and on, and on... "Kashmir" was in fact the inspiration for Philip Glass. (Okay, I made that part up... but the songs do go on, and on, and on.) Many of the tracks are outtakes from earlier albums, and some are excellent (the instrumental "Bron-Yr-Aur" is tuneful and remarkably terse; "Custard Pie" is mindless fun). There are lots of bright moments - "The Rover" has a cool riff, and "Trampled Underfoot" is a listenable ripoff of Stevie Wonder's "Superstition" - but there's too much filler in between. (DBW)

- He's right: "Kashmir" is an unlistenable disaster, and eleven minute escapades with boring chord progressions like "In My Time Of Dying" can't be salvaged by any amount of guitar heroics. But a lot of the other tracks do demonstrate significant stylistic variety and substantial amusement value - solid rock songs like "Houses Of The Holy," a reject from the LP of that name; nice acoustic numbers ("Bron-Yr-Aur"; "Black Country Woman"); standard, reasonable-length Zep epics ("Ten Years Gone"); etc. If Page had just cut it to a single LP, it would have been a high point in the band's career. (JA)

What, does Dave Marsh have siblings who also pretend to be journalists?

Link: http://www.warr.org/zep.html

I went to the link - a load of sour-grapes rubbish! For example, the 'author' thinks that Custard Pie AND Hats off... were both ripp-offs of Bukka White's "Shake em on down". Funny neither of those songs sound anything like the other! How could they both sound like Bukka's song? :blink:

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I went to the link - a load of sour-grapes rubbish! For example, the 'author' thinks that Custard Pie AND Hats off... were both ripp-offs of Bukka White's "Shake em on down". Funny neither of those songs sound anything like the other! How could they both sound like Bukka's song? :blink:

Once again, lyrical content and artistic style. Ditto Nobody's Fault But Mine, Lemon Song, Whole Lotta Love etc...

All *cough* influenced by other artists.

You'll no doubt find more than a few posts/threads on this subject if you use the search facility. It's been done to death a hundred times over.

You'll be asking about the mudshark next. :D

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Once again, lyrical content and artistic style. Ditto Nobody's Fault But Mine, Lemon Song, Whole Lotta Love etc...

All *cough* influenced by other artists.

You'll no doubt find more than a few posts/threads on this subject if you use the search facility. It's been done to death a hundred times over.

You'll be asking about the mudshark next. :D

Yeah, if I was the thread starter...

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....right....if they had only put out one album in their career of just their best songs it would have been a great album too....

Zeppelin never had critical success in the album department.....they had to settle for selling more of them than everybody else and having millions of fans who adored their musical escapades....oh well..too bad for them....

I really can't understand people who are 'fans' of theirs and wish they had recorded less though.....?......

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