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Rising Food Costs


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Don't know how many have noticed. This is something that is going to affect all of us. Supply and cost

What the hell happened ? Comments please

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Inflation, my man. Brought on by astronomical fuel costs. Here in Michigan, diesel fuel is about $4.20 a gallon. So it costs a ton for truckers to ship food around the country, which ultimately gets passed on to the consumer. It's brutal, eh?

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This is true; I'm really looking forward to my in laws' summer garden! I shop as cheaply as possible these days (Sam's, WalMart, Dollar Store, weekly specials at the grocery store, etc).

I also found this site:

http://www.couponmom.com/

It keeps a database of all active coupons; and also cross-references active coupons against some of the major grocery and drug store chains' weekly specials. We started dropping a good chunk of our grocery bill by using this site and planning our list around what's on sale that week. (Penny pinching is where I veer away from the Libra profile, lol). We also stock up on stuff like shampoo, toothpaste etc. when it's on sale and we have coupons.

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I work with some people from the city. About a year ago I watched them all give up driving to work and start taking the bus. If you ride a bus in the Detroit area, it's not uncommon to wait 45 minutes to an hour to be picked up, and that's just one stop. Try that when it's 10 degrees out. Now these same folks have to deal with skyrocketing food prices. If you work full-time at minimum wage, that's about $15,000 dollars a year without benefits. Many of these people used to work two jobs just to make ends meet. Most couldn't find two jobs now if they wanted to. An unemployment rate of 7.5% doesn't include people who have given up looking. My personal finances have felt the pinch of higher fuel and gas prices. I can't imagine trying to support any kind of household on minimum wage. There is no opportunity to better yourself when you can't feed your family. You can't go to school if you can't pay for gas or get a student loan. When there is no opportunity or means to better yourself, even decent people start to rob and steal, and then anarchy begins.

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Coupons can help lower the grocery bill. Another way to reduce the cost of food is to take advantage of what is plentiful, and frequent local farmers markets. Your food dollar should go toward items in rich supply. Restrict your spending on scarce items unless the prices are significantly low.

Gas prices are high at the moment, so you should take advantage of your bicycle if you have one or try to walk instead of drive. Limit driving to necessary trips.

A quick review of statistics from the United States Department of Agriculture can give you an idea of how to get the most value from your food dollar. You can select or subscribe to agricultural reports by state, including Michigan. Often times people are not aware of the U.S. government statistics on agriculture because they are watching television for information about food, which is mostly based on advertising to benefit the seller, not necessarily the consumer.

Corn acres are expected to drop, so corn prices will be higher, which will impact corn-fed beef and any products made from corn. You should plan to restrict purchases on these food products if want to get the most value for your food dollar. Romaine lettuce is shown at 84,900 acres harvested in 2007, compared to 58,300 in 2002, which tells you that romaine lettuce is presently in more ample supply. Yesterday I bought romaine at the market priced at $1.99 per 9-ounce or 255-gram bag, and noticed a large supply on the shelves.

There is a record abundant navel orange crop in California this year, so you may see lower prices for oranges in the markets. But although oranges are expected to be plentiful, grapefruit prices are likely to be high due to an 8 per cent decrease from last year's crop, so most of your citrus dollar should go towards oranges.

Berry crops were in ample supply this year, so those belong on your grocery list. Cherries were of a high quality this year, so you might check them out for prices. Potatoes are the world's 4th largest abundant food crop, so they should cost less than other foods.

Wheat crops were also plentiful this year so that may ease some of the pressure on world food costs depending on world demand, which has been significant. Corn and wheat prices recently have been at record highs so you would still want to watch the prices.

Apple prices in the United States are under pressure to rise due to a reduction acreage and a small crop in 2007. Yesterday I paid $4.49 for a 3-pound or 1.36-kg bag of Gala organically grown apples from Chile, so you have to watch the apple prices in the United States. More often you will see imported apples on the shelves in addition to the smaller crop from the state of Washington.

Almonds are also in large supply, so dust off your berry, cherry, orange and spinach-almond recipes. There are already plenty of almonds in the markets due to last year's record crop, and the upcoming year appears to bring the same.

Marlborough, New Zealand had a bountiful grape harvest that should reflect in lower prices for wines such as Sauvignon Blanc.

Pennsylvania expects a promising wild turkey hunting season due to a mild winter with abundant food and above-average nesting. One or two wild turkeys would get you nicely through the winter. If you are a hunter near the area, Pennsylvania would be a destination to put on your calendar this year. You would want one bird as fresh as possible for the Thanksgiving table, and the capacity to quickly clean and freeze the other one for the winter.

You eliminate the costs of the middle guys who usually deliver the goods to the market by going straight to the source. This is when Ted Nugent's bow-hunting advice is useful; say what you will about Ted, but he's the one likely to bring the wild turkey home. You would not want to put him in charge of a diplomatic mission, but he's good at hunting turkeys. If you are traveling near Pennsylvania at Thanksgiving time this year, you can expect wild turkey to be on the menus of local inns and restaurants at attractive prices.

Protective orange reflective strips and clothing for hunters is advised to prevent other hunters from mistaking you for a turkey, especially if you mimic turkey calls to attract prey. Reportedly some hunters were mistakenly shot in previous times due to the difficulty of distinguishing human from turkey.

This year you can gather morel mushrooms for personal use as a result of post-fire conditions in the Kootenai National Forest area that should yield a nice crop depending on the weather. Commercial use is not allowed in the Kootenai, so you won't see these in the markets, but the Flathead National Forest does allow commercial picking, which could mean you could see morels become more commonly available for purchase in the markets. You can take advantage of this local opportunity if you take a summer trip to Montana or Idaho, or know someone who does. Morels are excellent when used to flavor a white wine sauce to accompany baked chicken.

Corn-planting is behind schedule due to the drought, so corn and corn-fed beef may cost more; you would expect to limit spending on those items to make the most of your food dollar.

Often the media concentrates more on advertising restaurants, travel packages and expensive food items, while you read less often about abundant food sources that can lower your food bill. For instance, the record orange crop in California this year is meeting with slow demand, so you're less likely to read about it in the headlines.

Why the food press rarely talks about dollars and cents

Edited by eternal light
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Going by an artical in the Vancouver Province Newspaper it is not only commodity pricing but also a shortage of food supply. No1 grade A wheat has doubled in price in the last 12 months, White rice has trippled, Meat in the Vancouver area has gone up between 10-15 %. No end in sight as demand worldwide is exceeding supply. Aside from price, it concerns me as to what the quality of our food will be.

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Inflation, my man. Brought on by astronomical fuel costs. Here in Michigan, diesel fuel is about $4.20 a gallon. So it costs a ton for truckers to ship food around the country, which ultimately gets passed on to the consumer. It's brutal, eh?

The price of fuel here in the U.K is more than double what you pay in the U.S.

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The price of fuel here in the U.K is more than double what you pay in the U.S.

That was one of the reasons I posted this thread. It seems to me that North America is going to catch up very soon. Gasoline in Vancouver has gone up .30 alitre in two months. that would equate to about $1.20 a Gallon in the USA. No way around it, that is having a huge effect on food prices not to mention what people have to pay for other living expenses. Somethings got to give

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I work with some people from the city. About a year ago I watched them all give up driving to work and start taking the bus. If you ride a bus in the Detroit area, it's not uncommon to wait 45 minutes to an hour to be picked up, and that's just one stop. Try that when it's 10 degrees out. Now these same folks have to deal with skyrocketing food prices. If you work full-time at minimum wage, that's about $15,000 dollars a year without benefits. Many of these people used to work two jobs just to make ends meet. Most couldn't find two jobs now if they wanted to. An unemployment rate of 7.5% doesn't include people who have given up looking. My personal finances have felt the pinch of higher fuel and gas prices. I can't imagine trying to support any kind of household on minimum wage. There is no opportunity to better yourself when you can't feed your family. You can't go to school if you can't pay for gas or get a student loan. When there is no opportunity or means to better yourself, even decent people start to rob and steal, and then anarchy begins.

Thus the moral answer to Gun ownership Rights.

Those with out them will be victims.

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When we started putting our food crops in our cars, shortages and higher prices were inevitable.

Some of our shortages are due to a few years of drought... a lot of crops here failed.

Yes, our gas prices are a lot higher and some food items have gone much higher. I already do try to make my driving as productive as possible... and it all still costs a lot.

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Food Crisis Starts Eclipsing Climate Change Worries

Gore Ducks, as a Backlash Builds Against Biofuels

By JOSH GERSTEIN, Staff Reporter of the Sun | April 25, 2008

http://www.nysun.com/news/food-crisis-ecli...-climate-change

The campaign against climate change could be set back by the global food crisis, as foreign populations turn against measures to use foodstuffs as substitutes for fossil fuels.

One factor being blamed for the price hikes is the use of government subsidies to promote the use of corn for ethanol production. An estimated 30% of America’s corn crop now goes to fuel, not food.

Last year, Mr. Runge and a colleague, Benjamin Senauer, wrote an article in Foreign Affairs, “How Biofuels Could Starve the Poor.”

“We were criticized for being alarmist at the time,” Mr. Runge said. “I think our views, looking back a year, were probably too conservative.”

Ethanol was initially promoted as a vehicle for America to cut back on foreign oil. In recent years, biofuels have also been touted as a way to fight climate change, but the food crisis does not augur well for ethanol’s prospects.

“It takes around 400 pounds of corn to make 25 gallons of ethanol,” Mr. Senauer, also an applied economics professor at Minnesota, said. “It’s not going to be a very good diet but that’s roughly enough to keep an adult person alive for a year.”

Mr. Senauer said climate change advocates, such as Vice President Gore, need to distance themselves from ethanol to avoid tarnishing the effort against global warming. “Crop-based biofuels are not part of the solution. They, in fact, add to the problem. Whether Al Gore has caught up with that, somebody ought to ask him,” the professor said. “There are lots of solutions, real solutions to climate change. We need to get to those.”

Mr. Gore was not available for an interview yesterday on the food crisis, according to his spokeswoman. A spokesman for Mr. Gore’s public campaign to address climate change, the Alliance for Climate Protection, declined to comment for this article.

However, the scientist who shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mr. Gore, Rajendra Pachauri of the United Nations’s Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change, has warned that climate campaigners are unwise to promote biofuels in a way that risks food supplies. “We should be very, very careful about coming up with biofuel solutions that have major impact on production of food grains and may have an implication for overall food security,” Mr. Pachauri told reporters last month, according to Reuters. “Questions do arise about what is being done in North America, for instance, to convert corn into sugar then into biofuels, into ethanol.”

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When we started putting our food crops in our cars, shortages and higher prices were inevitable.

You said it brother! All this BULLSHIT about bio-fuels when we have billions of barrels of oil just to be had if we only DRILLED THE SHIT OUT of our own oil fields... WHEREVER THEY ARE!

And the other thing is that currently there is a lot of speculating in commodities markets. So some of the rising fuel and food costs are related to that. But that 'bubble' will burst soon, and then some of these prices will come down a bit.

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You said it brother! All this BULLSHIT about bio-fuels when we have billions of barrels of oil just to be had if we only DRILLED THE SHIT OUT of our own oil fields... WHEREVER THEY ARE!

And the other thing is that currently there is a lot of speculating in commodities markets. So some of the rising fuel and food costs are related to that. But that 'bubble' will burst soon, and then some of these prices will come down a bit.

Some "smart" members in Congres are already calling for Marekt reforms relating to speculation that causes the price of oil and food to rise, NECESSITIES, fro no reason, other than speculation.

FUCK THE MARKET.....AND THE ASSHOLES THAT GET RICH RAPING THE AMERICAN PUBLIC.....

FUCK THEM .... REALLY ! ! ! ! !

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Food Crisis Starts Eclipsing Climate Change Worries

Gore Ducks, as a Backlash Builds Against Biofuels

By JOSH GERSTEIN, Staff Reporter of the Sun | April 25, 2008

http://www.nysun.com/news/food-crisis-ecli...-climate-change

The campaign against climate change could be set back by the global food crisis, as foreign populations turn against measures to use foodstuffs as substitutes for fossil fuels.

One factor being blamed for the price hikes is the use of government subsidies to promote the use of corn for ethanol production. An estimated 30% of America’s corn crop now goes to fuel, not food.

Last year, Mr. Runge and a colleague, Benjamin Senauer, wrote an article in Foreign Affairs, “How Biofuels Could Starve the Poor.”

“We were criticized for being alarmist at the time,” Mr. Runge said. “I think our views, looking back a year, were probably too conservative.”

Ethanol was initially promoted as a vehicle for America to cut back on foreign oil. In recent years, biofuels have also been touted as a way to fight climate change, but the food crisis does not augur well for ethanol’s prospects.

“It takes around 400 pounds of corn to make 25 gallons of ethanol,” Mr. Senauer, also an applied economics professor at Minnesota, said. “It’s not going to be a very good diet but that’s roughly enough to keep an adult person alive for a year.”

Mr. Senauer said climate change advocates, such as Vice President Gore, need to distance themselves from ethanol to avoid tarnishing the effort against global warming. “Crop-based biofuels are not part of the solution. They, in fact, add to the problem. Whether Al Gore has caught up with that, somebody ought to ask him,” the professor said. “There are lots of solutions, real solutions to climate change. We need to get to those.”

Mr. Gore was not available for an interview yesterday on the food crisis, according to his spokeswoman. A spokesman for Mr. Gore’s public campaign to address climate change, the Alliance for Climate Protection, declined to comment for this article.

However, the scientist who shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mr. Gore, Rajendra Pachauri of the United Nations’s Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change, has warned that climate campaigners are unwise to promote biofuels in a way that risks food supplies. “We should be very, very careful about coming up with biofuel solutions that have major impact on production of food grains and may have an implication for overall food security,” Mr. Pachauri told reporters last month, according to Reuters. “Questions do arise about what is being done in North America, for instance, to convert corn into sugar then into biofuels, into ethanol.”

How justifY:

Brasil has the biggest organic fuel (sugar cane alcohol) word production, while change itself as the biggest food producer?

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It's all related to our oil nightmare, yes, including corn used for ethanol.

The Fate Of Nations Cd cover comes to mind, the earth melting................ :(:unsure:

Everything I buy has gone way up.

In fact that's one of my pet peeves. Coffee creamer! Coffeemate was only 2.50 last year and now it is 4.00 and up. Coffee is my savior in the morning. If I have to give up other things I will, but I'll buy my creamer, damn it. Even though it pisses me off! :angry:<_<

Orange juice....never went down after the freeze last year. And eggs...I'm trying to bypass those things I think are well overpriced.

Rice, I only eat brown rice. Still a good deal.

IF I had a yard I would most definitely grow my own.

Edited by Hotplant
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Supermarkets get discounted electric bills.(up to 50%) The amount of energy that a supermarket uses is unbelievable. There has been some electric hikes lately too. Which i assume will add fuel to the fire.

Obama once tried to get a law passed to ban the supermarket elec. rate. in which he stated why should big corp. get a break while reg. folks get screwed. By the way, his ban would only take effect in the suburbs, since the ban had a sq. footage rule, which all Chicago supermarkets were under, so they still received the discounted electric rate.

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I had seen a thing on the history channel years ago about how cheap food helped build -america. Today there are costcos,bjs outlets, trader joes, whole foods, along with all the other regular super markets and yet food is much more expensive, especially produce. I made a big pot of new england clam chowder yesterday and just had to pick up two quarts of heavy cream and a pound of bacon and it was 17dollars and change.

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You said it brother! All this BULLSHIT about bio-fuels when we have billions of barrels of oil just to be had if we only DRILLED THE SHIT OUT of our own oil fields... WHEREVER THEY ARE!

Yeah, we were too early in forcing ethanol substitutes. We borrowed trouble. But we are approaching peak oil production. Drilling any and all fields will not help for much longer than 20 to 30 years. What happens after that?

To delay the impact of peak oil we have to consider efficiency more seriously. It looks like transporting food is not efficient. In California, homes are replacing farmlands. The piper will be paid sooner or later. At some point we will have to have some kind of national policy to balance residency with local agriculture.

And the other thing is that currently there is a lot of speculating in commodities markets. So some of the rising fuel and food costs are related to that. But that 'bubble' will burst soon, and then some of these prices will come down a bit.

Bubble or not, speculation shows that informed professional investors expect that prices will continue to rise. That does mean something. While there will be corrections for over speculation, I don't take it as a sign that prices are artificially high.

Some "smart" members in Congress are already calling for Market reforms relating to speculation that causes the price of oil and food to rise, NECESSITIES, fro no reason, other than speculation.

FUCK THE MARKET.....AND THE ASSHOLES THAT GET RICH RAPING THE AMERICAN PUBLIC.....

FUCK THEM .... REALLY ! ! ! ! !

I'll be cynical as to why members of Congress are calling for reforms to speculation. Who supports those members of Congress and how do those supporters benefit from this change in regulation? I lean liberal but I see a free market as the proper place to sort out most economic issues. Attempts at government control of any particular market situation creates an unnatural imbalance that will correct itself, probably more violently, at some point in the future.

Speculators act as agents for what most likely will happen in the future. If speculators anticipate a shortage of food or oil ahead of the public, the price rise due to their speculation might help to curb consumption and preserve oil or food for the future. This is not artificial. The government's role is to establish a fair and transparent market, not to manipulate it.

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