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The reason why the bass was so low and the trebles were so high was because the Marshall 1959SLPs were a very dark sounding amp.

Having the exact same settings on a different amp will give you different results.

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I use a Marshall DSL 50-watt head with Celestion Vintage 30s.

For Zeppelin my settings are:

Classic Gain Channel; Crunch Mode

Gain:7

Volume: 4

Presence: 6

Trebel: 9

Middle: 6

Bass: 4

No Mid Cut or Deep switches engaged.

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OK, let me try again, if I was trying two amp's, one a "Super Lead" with out a "Gain" (main) just a Loudness (volume) knob and also a regular Marshall with both a "Master" and a "Gain" knob and I want to get a close (as I can get) sound of the "Super Lead" from the "Master Head". Being that the "Master Head" has an extra gain stage if I ran it's Master knob at (or close to) the top could I get a close copy of the "Super Lead's" gain structure? I would think it would be close as long as the "Main" gain circuit's are near the same, that is if they just slapped in an extra gain stage for the newer "Master Head".

I have yet to find a master volume amp that sounds and responds like a non-master volume amp. That said, I would start by turning the master volume all the way up and then adjust the gain to suit my tastes. Then, when I'd had enough, I'd sell my amp and buy a Plexi. :D

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I have yet to find a master volume amp that sounds and responds like a non-master volume amp. That said, I would start by turning the master volume all the way up and then adjust the gain to suit my tastes. Then, when I'd had enough, I'd sell my amp and buy a Plexi. :D

He He, that sound like a good plan GP. One of the reply's at the site from the link I provided earlier said, "you don't want a Super Lead unless your playing in large clubs and have the need/ability to max it out!"

Also, the other link explains some major cap differences in the two amp's (Super Lead and Master Head), being the dark sound that was talked about.

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He He, that sound like a good plan GP. One of the reply's at the site from the link I provided earlier said, "you don't want a Super Lead unless your playing in large clubs and have the need/ability to max it out!"

A power attenuator is a must. I use a THD Hot Plate on mine. I taught lessons with it for years and still use it at home for practice and recording. I may not gig anymore but I refuse to compromise on tone.

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A power attenuator is a must. I use a THD Hot Plate on mine. I taught lessons with it for years and still use it at home for practice and recording. I may not gig anymore but I refuse to compromise on tone.

Ah...! yes! I forgot about those little gem's! I use to know a guy who had a "Power Soak", Tom Scholz made. He was using it with a JCM 800 100 watt and a "A" cab (1960 maybe), not sure what speakers where in it (G1275?). He did get a "Power Break" to but I don't know much about that device.

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I've heard bad things about the Power Brake. Blown heads and such. I used a THD Hot Plate with my Plexi without incident though.

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I've heard bad things about the Power Brake. Blown heads and such. I used a THD Hot Plate with my Plexi without incident though.

I heard the same thing about the Power Brake, although it seemed weird to me that Marshall would sell a product that it knew to be destructive to its other products. On the other hand, the THD got sterling reviews, so much so that I bought two, one for my 16 ohm cab at home and another for the 8 ohm cab I was using at work. In five years I've retubed once and replaced three fuses. Sounds like normal wear and tear to me, but I would like to know why the fuses blow every so often.

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