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Rock Historian

Why I love Zeppelin

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I discovered Led Zeppelin around the age of 14. My neighbor (Brian) who was about 10 or 12 years older than me was into music heavily. Every weekend he would be outside washing his new truck, and I would offer to help him. It started to become a weekly ritual, and when I was finished helping him, he would take me around the area we lived and just cruise around. He would turn me on to all this music I had yet to discover. He always had something new playing in his tape deck. My first memories of The Who, Iron Maiden, Rush, Jethro Tull, Motley Crue, Ratt and many others came from the speakers of his truck. I'd always ask ,"who's this??" and he'd tell me the bands name usually followed by a little bit of info on the group. I thought this guy was the coolest. You have to keep in mind that this was the mid-to late 80's and Hair Metal ruled MTV and pop-culture. One day he put a tape in and didn't say a word......."Hey, hey mamma said the way you move, gonna make you sweat, gonna make you groove" poured from the speakers followed by this massive riff that could destroy Satan himslf. I instantly new this was different from anything I had heard in my 14 years of life. I shouted over the music,"Who is this?" Brian answered,"Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest bands ever". I was hooked.

He then played The Rover and once again, the riff blew me away. It was so heavy and musical. I subscibed to one of those music companies that sold tapes and cd's (BMG music). You paid for the first tape and then the others were free and you paid for shipping. Anyone remember? I ordered a few from Rush and ZZ Top and Led Zeppelin IV. I recieved them in the mail a week later and played the hell out of Zep IV until the felt started to fade on the bottom of the tape. Brian also gave me Led Zep II on vinyl around this time. I didn't have a state of the art record player, but there was my little brothers Fisher Price record player with a mini speaker in it, used for playing childrens records, etc. Once I put on the first track I was hooked. The Fisher Price record player was transformed into my own personal escape. Markings of "Zeppelin Rulez" were written all over the tiny white record player. It was now mine. My friends at the time were all into the fad, fashion and music of the day. I tried to turn them on to Zeppelin, but it was over their heads. They didn't understand the musicality of this new band I was introduced to. I slowly became an outsider to my pack of friends and was lightly joked uopn because of my taste in music. But I knew deep down that what I liked was truly music. I knew it was good and it had meaning, passion and soul-which the music of the day lacked completely. Zeppelin was like a revelation to me.

Soon after I started to study and read about them through books and magazines. I would travel 5 miles round trip on my bike to the closest music shop called Acorn Records and Tapes. Every week I would by a new Zeppelin or Zep related album unil my collection was complete. I became obsessed with Zeppelin. They were all I listened to. My parents told me it was okay to listen to music but to be that much into just one band all the time was little over the top. I didn't care. I couldn't get enough of them, and with each album and song I became more fixated on their whole purpose. I bought Hammer of the Gods like every other fool and believed it all, until I realised it was mosltly bullshit years later. With all of this going on at one time, I took an interest in playing guitar. My mom bought me a $99 guitar with a built-in speaker from Sears or something. It took one 9V battery. I joined a music class as an elective in High School and met a bunch of cool guys who were moslty into the same stuff as myself. There were a few Hair Band activist, who I was cool with but never had any real communication with. They didn't like Zep a whole lot, so I didn't care much for them. It's almost as if I didn't really trust or respect them because they didn't like Zeppelin. How could these guys not care for Zeppelin??? Were they insane?. We would have arguments about who was the best band and all that jazz - and at times I became very defensive. I held Zeppelin very close to my heart. They were in a way my savior from all the trash on the radio/TV.

I soon noticed that my talent for playing guitar came very natural to me. I never learned to read music, but I could hear something once or twice and figure out the chords and play it. I formed a band with two other classmates and ironically called the band "Achilles"...go figure. After playing the guitar for a few months , I gained interest in the drums and managed to get a hold of an old Rogers drum set. This was my position in the band. Again, my co-ordination was natural. I became quite good in a short period of time. We wrote our own music, which to this day sounds pretty good. It was more on the metal side of things - like Metallica or Iron Maiden. Achilles did a few talent shows for school and a few parties here and there.

It was now 1989. There were two Classic Rock radio stations at this time who basically played the same stuff. 92.3 "Classic Rock" and WRNO 99.5 "The Rock of New Orleans" On weekends and school nights when I had nothing to do, I would glue myself to the radio and just listen, I would spend hours engulfed in the music coming into my room. As time passed, I was able to name any song on the radio, the artist, the year, the album, etc. You name it, I knew it. This was my HOMEWORK.

A few years passed, as the routine continued. Around the age of 19 or 20 I started to collect bootlegs and managed to aquire a nice size collection. I had boots from every year. Probably 40 concerts in all. By this time my entire room was covered with Zep posters, memorabilia, etc. (which I have all lost since then, due to Hurricane Katrina in 2005) My band had split up and I was looking for a new project to get into. I knew my talents would take me somewhere, and most of all I enjoyed it. A friend of mine was looking to join a group but they needed a bass player, not a drummer. I had always had an interest in bass and now was a good time to try it out. I borrowed a bass from a musical friend and it was just as natural as any other instrument. I was new to the instrument, so I wasn't all that flashy yet, but I knew the notes, which was good enough for now. I was also singing a bit at the time. After a few jam sessions, a new band was formed called "DeJa Vu". We played top 40 classic rock and a few originals.

My love for Zeppelin was still strong, even though I had managed to appreciate other great bands like Rush and Pink Floyd, none of the new music was of interest. Everything I liked was considered "old". (Classic Rock) I also aquired a love for the blues, which again was inspired by my love for Zeppelin. Zeppelin opened my eyes to how music should be composed and arranged- not only how to play.

I was born on October 23rd, 1973. The year Houses of the Holy was released, almost to the day. What better way to celebrate my love, than a permanant mark? Me and a few buddies of mine decided to get a tattoo one evning...Mine.....We'll I had the indide cover of HOTH engraved on my left arm. You know, the pic of the guy holding the adolecent child over his head. Looks exactly like it, except bigger. I brought the album with me that night so the artist couls sketch it out on paper...It looks beautiful to this day...Another reminder of The Zeppelin.....

In 1997, I formed a trio with my brother on drums, a guitar player and myself on bass/vocals called "Three Piece White Meat". The name was hilarious, but we were hungry musicians who played around town consistantly. We did originals with a mix of Zeppelin, Rush and Black Sabbath. We were all heavy into Zeppelin and the guitar players father owned a record shop. The next few years of my life would be spent in and out of this shop, buying anything available from Zeppelin. My collection was getting bigger and bigger. It was good to finally realise at this point that the path I had chosen (musical preference) was indeed a good one, because my like-minded friends all had good taste and had been through that same phase in life. My friends had good taste, and I suppose so did I. It all made sense. All the years I had been teased because of what I had listened to, didn't matter anymore. I knew from an early age that what I embraced was going to shape my life and it did.

In 2000, I had the pleasure of meeting one of my idols. Mr. JPJ at the HOB in New Orleans. He was supporting his Zooma LP. After a fantastic show, I waited outside for 3 hours to meet him. As he came out, I got nervous. I didn't know what to say!!!! After he signed a few autograph I asked him to take a few pics with me and sign a few things. I told him what an impact he had on my life growing up and he seemed really humbled by my comments. He was very polite and easy going. After the pics he said to me "good luck with your music, I hope you do well out there" and he disappeard into the dark ally. I was speechless for days. I couldn't believe I actually met JPJ. It was incredible. My brother and some friends (who also met him that night) were all in a daze for a week or so. Did we just meet The Master of Bass??? Yes, we did.

A year or so later, I formed another Trio called "Endora's Mask" which still exist to this day. You can check out a few tunes at:

http://www.myspace.com/endorasmask

Our Zeppelin influence in subtle but obvious in certain phrasings and arragements. It's very tasteful and unique, which is hard to come by these days. I wouldn't say that we sound like any one band, really. It's a good mix of classic vs. modern. See for yourself. So If you are wondering.....

What does Zeppelin mean to me?.............

Everthing.

They are the most influential rock band of all time.

They have shaped my past, present and future.

And for that, I am very grateful to be who I am today.

Zeppelin Rulez!

Edited by Rock Historian

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I discovered Led Zeppelin around the age of 14. My neighbor (Brian) who was about 10 or 12 years older than me was into music heavily. Every weekend he would be outside washing his new truck, and I would offer to help him. It started to become a weekly ritual, and when I was finished helping him, he would take me around the area we lived and just cruise around. He would turn me on to all this music I had yet to discover. He always had something new playing in his tape deck. My first memories of The Who, Iron Maiden, Rush, Jethro Tull, Motley Crue, Ratt and many others came from the speakers of his truck. I'd always ask ,"who's this??" and he'd tell me the bands name usually followed by a little bit of info on the group. I thought this guy was the coolest. You have to keep in mind that this was the mid-to late 80's and Hair Metal ruled MTV and pop-culture. One day he put a tape in and didn't say a word......."Hey, hey mamma said the way you move, gonna make you sweat, gonna make you groove" poored from the speakers followed by this massive riff that could destroy Satan himslf. I instantly new this was different from anything I had heard in my 14 years of life. I shouted over the music,"Who is this?" Brian answered,"Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest bands ever". I was hooked.

He then played The Rover and once again, the riff blew me away. It was so heavy and musical. I subscibed to one of those music companies that sold tapes and cd's (BMG music). You paid for the first tape and then the others were free and you paid for shipping. Anyone remember? I ordered a few from Rush and ZZ Top and Led Zeppelin IV. I recieved them in the mail a week later and played the hell out of Zep IV until the felt started to fade on the bottom of the tape. Brian also gave me Led Zep II on vinyl around this time. I didn't have a state of the art record player, but there was my little brothers Fisher Price record player with a mimi speaker in it, used for playing childrens records, etc. Once I put on the first track I was hooked. The Fisher Price record player was transformed into my own personal escape. Markings of "Zeppelin Rulez" were written all over the tiny white record player. It was now mine. My friends at the time were all into the fad, fashion and music of the day. I tried to turn them on to Zeppelin, but it was over their heads. They didn't understand the musicality of this new band I was introduced to. I slowly became an outsider to my pack of friends and was lightly joked uopn because of my taste in music. But I knew deep down that what I liked was truly music. I knew it was good and it had meaning, passion and sould-which the music of the day lacked completely. Zeppelin was like a revelation to me.

Soon after I started to study and read about them through books and magazines. I would travel 5 miles round trip on my bike to the closest music shop called Acorn Records and Tapes. Every week I would by a new Zeppelin or Zep related album unil my collection was complete. I became obsessed with Zeppelin. They were all I listened to. My parents told me it was okay to listen to music but to be that much into just ine band all the time was little over the top. I didn't care. I couldn't get enough of them, and with each album and song I became more fixated on their whole purpose. I bought Hammer of the Gods like every other fool and belived it all, until I realised it was mosltly bullshit years later. With all of this going on at one time, I took an interest in playing guitar. My mom bought me a $99 guitar with a built-in speaker from Sears or something. It took one 9V battery. I joined a music class as an elective in High School and met a bunch of cool guys who were moslty into the same stuff as myself. There were a few Hair Band activist, who I was cool with but neber had any real communication with. They didn't like Zep a whole lot, and so I didn't care much for them. It's almost as if I didn't really trust or respect them because they didn't like Zeppelin. How could these guys not care for Zeppelin???Were they insane or what. We would have arguments about who was the bast band and all that jazz and at time I became very defensive. I held Zeppelin very close to my heart. They were in a way my savior from all the trash on the radio/TV.

I soon noticed that my talent for playing guitar came very natural to me. I never learned to read music, but I could hear something once or twice and figure out the chords and play it. I formed a band with two other classmates and ironically called the band "Achilles"...go figure. After playing the guitar for a few months , I gained interest in the drums and managed to get a hold of an old Rogers drum set. This was my position in the band. Again, my co-ordination was natural. I became quite good in a short period of time. We wrote our own music, which to this day sounds pretty good. It was more on the metal side of things - like Metallica or Iron Madien. Achilles did a few talent shows for school and a few parties here and there.

It was now 1989. There were two Classic Rock radio stations at this time who basically played the same stuff. 92.3 "Classic Rock" and WRNO 99.5 "The Rock of New Orleans" On weekend and school night when I had nothing to do, I would glue myself to the radio and just listen, I would spent hours engulfed at the musi coming into my room. As time passed, I was able to name any song on the radio, the artist, the year, the album, etc. You name it, I knew it. This was my HOMEWORK.

A few years passed, as the routine continued. Around the age of 19 or 20 I started to collect bootlegs and managed to aquire a nice size collection. I had boots from every year. Probably 40 concerts in all. By this time my entire room was covered with Zep posters, memorabilia, etc. My band had split up by this time and I was looking for a new project to get into. I new my talents would take me somewhere, and most of all I enjoyed it. A fried of mine was looking to join agroup but they needed a bass player, not a drummer. I had always has an interest in bass and now was a good time to try it out. I borrowed a bass from a musical frien and it was just as natural as any other instrument. I was to new to the instrument to be flashy yet, but I knew the notes, which was good enough for now. I was also singing a bit at the time. After a few jam sessions, a new band was formed called "DeJa Vu". We played top 40 classic rock and a few originals.

My love for Zeppelin was still strong, even though I had managed to appreciate other great bands like Rush and Pink Floyd, none of the new music was of interest. Everything I liked was considered "old". (Classic Rock) I also aquired a love for the blues, which again was inspired by my love for Zeppelin. Zeppelin opened my eyes to how music should be composed and arranged- not only how to play.

In 1997, I fomed a trio with my bother on drums, a guitar player and myself on bass/vocals called "Three Piece White Meat". The name was hilarious, but we were hungry musicians who played around town consistantly. We did originals with a mix of Zeppelin, Rush and Black Sabbath. We were all heay into Zeppelin and the guitar players father owned a record shop. The next few years of my life would be spent in and out of this shop, buying anything available from Zeppelin. My collection was getting bigger and bigger. It was good to finally realise at this point that the path I had chosen (musical preference) was indeed a good one, because my like-minded friends all had good taste and had been through that same phase in life. My friends had good taste, and I suppose so did I. It all made sense. All the years I had been teased because of what I had listened to, didn't matter anymore. I knew from an early age that what I embraced was going to shape my life and it did.

In 2000, I had the pleasure of meeting one of my idols. Mr. JPJ at the HOB in New Orleans. He was supporting his Zooma LP. After a fantastic show, I waited outside for 3 hours to meet him. As he came out, I got nervous. I didn't know what to say!!!! After he signed a few autograph I asked him to take a few pics with me and sign a few things. I told him what an impact he had on my life growing up and he seemed really humbled by my comments. He was very polite and easy going. After the pics he said to me "good luck with your music, I hope you do well out there" and he disappeard into the dark ally. I was speechless for days. I couldn't believe I actually met JPJ. It was incredible. My brother and some friends (who also met him that night) were all in a daze for a week or so. Did we just meet The Master of Bass??? Yes, we did.

A year or so later, I formed another Trio called "Endora's Mask" which still exist to this day. You can check out a few tunes at:

http://www.myspace.com/endorasmask

Our Zeppelin influence in subtle but obvious in certain phrasings and arragements. It's very tasteful and unique, which is hard to come by these days. I wouldn't say that we sound like any one band, really. It's a good mix of classic vs. modern. See for yourself. So If you are wondering.....

What does Zeppelin mean to me?.............

Everthing.

They are the most influential rock band of all time.

They have shaped my past, present and future.

And for that, I am very grateful to be who I am today.

Zeppelin Rulez!

Your post really hit me. I have a 17-year-old daughter who is greatly insluenced by these guys, too. She works hard to play like Jimmy. But who can? We have kept up with everything that's going on with Jimmy, and the other band memebers. But mostly Jimmy. He's a great producer and musician, and that's how he wants to be reembered, according to an interview he gave to "Guitar World" magazine. She, too wants to start up a band, produce, and write the music. I know it's not easy, but Jimmy did give us some advice, via interviews we read, about how to go about it. He is a great influence on her, and she has a dream. She plays acoustic, and hollow-body electric. Any ideas as to where she can start?

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Your post really hit me. I have a 17-year-old daughter who is greatly insluenced by these guys, too. She works hard to play like Jimmy. But who can? We have kept up with everything that's going on with Jimmy, and the other band memebers. But mostly Jimmy. He's a great producer and musician, and that's how he wants to be reembered, according to an interview he gave to "Guitar World" magazine. She, too wants to start up a band, produce, and write the music. I know it's not easy, but Jimmy did give us some advice, via interviews we read, about how to go about it. He is a great influence on her, and she has a dream. She plays acoustic, and hollow-body electric. Any ideas as to where she can start?

Where or How?

I was fortunate to be surrounded by some very cool people at the time. Some were better than me and were willing to show me any lick I wanted to learn. It came very natural for me as I said in my story. I don't know how well your daugher takes to the instrument, but if there is not a presense close by to show her, you can get some books that show the tablature for chords. (It shows you where to place your fingers) If she's into it, she will practice. I soon learned to start with the easy riffs, and not the complicated ones. I used to begin with Whole Lotta Love and Iron Man, which are pretty easy once you get familiar and comfortable with the instrument. I don't know how far along she is, but this may help. Also, tuning the guitar is another vital step.

Edited by Rock Historian

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Forget seeing ancient Rome or the building of the Great Wall in China, when time machines are built, Ill be in the 70's at a Zeppelin concert.

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Forget seeing ancient Rome or the building of the Great Wall in China, when time machines are built, Ill be in the 70's at a Zeppelin concert.

I hear ya, my friend!

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Good story.

I was introduced to LZ at thirteen in 1969. I was also blown away by what I heard. the opening riff to Communication Breakdown was everything I wanted to say and changed my life forever. Before that, Cream was the band I most identified with, but after LZ I, that was no longer the case. I also, loved and was influenced by other bands. Most notably the Detroit rock bands of the day. The Stooges, MC5, Bob Seger and others. But something about Page and Co. was heads over heals better than anything out at the time, even the Stones or Beatles (who were still together at the time). And the good part was, that each album got better. They grew up with each new release. I've never lost interest in this group and enjoy them now, maybe even more, than before.

BTW, about meeting your idol. I once had the good fortune to meet one of mine. Anysley Dunbar, when he was with Journey, was at a local record store, with the rest of the group, signing autographs and promoting a new release. This was before they were superstars as Steve Perry hadn't joined yet, so they were still approachable. I waited until the line ended and walked up and introduced myself to him. He was very pleasant and we talked shop for about 10-15 minutes. I asked him about drum equipment and playing techniques and he answered all of my questions completely and didn't make me feel like he was trying to get away. At the end I gave him a card of the band I was in, and he thanked me. I've met other famous musicians and most have acted like you're a pain in the ass and wasting their time. This was different and I've never forgotten that.

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Where or How?

I was fortunate to be surrounded by some very cool people at the time. Some were better than me and were willing to show me any lick I wanted to learn. It came very natural for me as I said in my story. I don't know how well your daugher takes to the instrument, but if there is not a presense close by to show her, you can get some books that show the tablature for chords. (It shows you where to place your fingers) If she's into it, she will practice. I soon learned to start with the easy riffs, and not the complicated ones. I used to begin with Whole Lotta Love and Iron Man, which are pretty easy once you get familiar and comfortable with the instrument. I don't know how far along she is, but this may help. Also, tuning the guitar is another vital step.

Thanks for the add. And the response. She knows everything you just mentioned here. Forgive me if it sounds like I'm bragging, but she has a gift. All she has to do is watch Jimmy a few times, whether it be on the band's D.V.D's, or youtube, and she could figure it out. She can play by ear, and since her dad is also a self-taught musician, he showed her how to tune her guitar. She can play "over the hills and far away". The beginning part, that is, as well as a few other songs. She can also fo the neck-tapping Jimmy style. Which means, she can hold it over her head like he did.

She does need encouragement, though. From time to time, I have to remind her of one thing. She has a gift, whereas Jimmy had to take guitar lessons. She has a desire to learn his more challenging work, though. Like "Hats off to Roy Harper".

Unfortunately, she has no exposure like you did. She likes to sing, though. She wears flowers in her hair sometimes. Yes, she claims "Going to california" as her song. She says that's her. Right down to te part where Robert sings"Looking for a girl who has never, never been born".

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Forget seeing ancient Rome or the building of the Great Wall in China, when time machines are built, Ill be in the 70's at a Zeppelin concert.

Time machine? Move over!

When they were in L.A. in the mid-to-late '70's, I wasn't interested, even though the radio station was giving tickets away! Imagine that! Now, you have to get in a lottery to even be considered for one of their tickets.

At least Jimmy and I were in the same earthquake in '71. He was in hollywood at the time, and I was in LA., which is just the next town over. He didn't like it too much. Yay, I have one thing in common with him!

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nice myspace page, It was cool to hear some of ther recording tech's you used, Great tunes dude.

Also great story on how you got turned on to zep, Keep the faith!

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nice myspace page, It was cool to hear some of ther recording tech's you used, Great tunes dude.

Also great story on how you got turned on to zep, Keep the faith!

Thanks for the genuine comment. So glad you enjoy our music...I'm pretty proud of it. Take Care and long live The Led Zeppelin!!!!!

Edited by Rock Historian

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Thanks for the add. And the response. She knows everything you just mentioned here. Forgive me if it sounds like I'm bragging, but she has a gift. All she has to do is watch Jimmy a few times, whether it be on the band's D.V.D's, or youtube, and she could figure it out. She can play by ear, and since her dad is also a self-taught musician, he showed her how to tune her guitar. She can play "over the hills and far away". The beginning part, that is, as well as a few other songs. She can also fo the neck-tapping Jimmy style. Which means, she can hold it over her head like he did.

She does need encouragement, though. From time to time, I have to remind her of one thing. She has a gift, whereas Jimmy had to take guitar lessons. She has a desire to learn his more challenging work, though. Like "Hats off to Roy Harper".

Unfortunately, she has no exposure like you did. She likes to sing, though. She wears flowers in her hair sometimes. Yes, she claims "Going to california" as her song. She says that's her. Right down to te part where Robert sings"Looking for a girl who has never, never been born".

I wish her much luck. Sounds like she has alot of support from you guys too, which is great. My parents didn't really encourage my choice, but it kept me out of trouble. We used to practice (with my first band) in my dad's shed where he kept tools, a lawnmower, etc. The cops would show up all the time, because we played so loud and annoyed the neighbors..Those were great times!!!

Your daughter certainly has one thing in her favor...she has good taste in music...tell her to keep it up! I'm glad you enjoyed my story. To sum it up, it was a very important phase of my life, and Zeppelins power overtook me. That's all I can say.

Edited by Rock Historian

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Historian, I'm with you, man, even though I'm a bit older. One question though. WAs Hammer of the Godssuch a bad book? I had a copy back when I was a teenager and was thoroughly enrapt with the story that book gave. Are you here to tell me that it's all rubbish? What have you found to be more historically accurate? Where can I find the truth? Anyway, enjoyed your story and mine has a few similarities to yours, but that's for a later time.

peace and the blues,

sailor

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Historian, I'm with you, man, even though I'm a bit older. One question though. WAs Hammer of the Godssuch a bad book? I had a copy back when I was a teenager and was thoroughly enrapt with the story that book gave. Are you here to tell me that it's all rubbish? What have you found to be more historically accurate? Where can I find the truth? Anyway, enjoyed your story and mine has a few similarities to yours, but that's for a later time.

peace and the blues,

sailor

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Your post really hit me. I have a 17-year-old daughter who is greatly insluenced by these guys, too. She works hard to play like Jimmy. But who can? We have kept up with everything that's going on with Jimmy, and the other band memebers. But mostly Jimmy. He's a great producer and musician, and that's how he wants to be reembered, according to an interview he gave to "Guitar World" magazine. She, too wants to start up a band, produce, and write the music. I know it's not easy, but Jimmy did give us some advice, via interviews we read, about how to go about it. He is a great influence on her, and she has a dream. She plays acoustic, and hollow-body electric. Any ideas as to where she can start?

Cali girl, you might want to get an actual Zeppelin songbook for guitar. "Hats off to Roy..." incorporates a different non-standard tuning of Jimmy's guitar. I believe it's tuned to an open C but I can't remember for sure. (I haven't played that song in over twenty years). That's not the only example of Jimmy's diversity. He did it on a number of other songs, including Bron-Y-Aur, Friends, Black Mountain Side, to name a few. In any rate, I thoroughly love the idea of today's youth being turned on by great, time-tested classic rock like we all were. God bless and rock on!

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Historian, I'm with you, man, even though I'm a bit older. One question though. WAs Hammer of the Godssuch a bad book? I had a copy back when I was a teenager and was thoroughly enrapt with the story that book gave. Are you here to tell me that it's all rubbish? What have you found to be more historically accurate? Where can I find the truth? Anyway, enjoyed your story and mine has a few similarities to yours, but that's for a later time.

peace and the blues,

sailor

Hey man, thanks for the reply. Glad you enjoyed my "essay".... I also still have a copy of Hammer of the Gods. As far as the book being bullshit, was going off of what all the surviving members have said about the book themselves, so I suppose there's no other reason to believe otherwise. Lets just say that if anyone knows what happened in the circle of Led Zeppelin, it's the members themselves and not some guy who was fired by the band. Don't get me wrong, there is probably some truth to the tales, but I think for the most part the stories are out of context and in some way , blown up...as the myth goes on. But yeah, I see where your coming from. I was young when I bought that book, so I believed anything I read about them because they were a mystery to me. If you want a good Zeppelin book try and find "Heaven and Hell" or The Concert Files. There are stories, full concert dates and history of songs in both books. Keep Rockin man!

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I wish her much luck. Sounds like she has alot of support from you guys too, which is great. My parents didn't really encourage my choice, but it kept me out of trouble. We used to practice (with my first band) in my dad's shed where he kept tools, a lawnmower, etc. The cops would show up all the time, because we played so loud and annoyed the neighbors..Those were great times!!!

Your daughter certainly has one thing in her favor...she has good taste in music...tell her to keep it up! I'm glad you enjoyed my story. To sum it up, it was a very important phase of my life, and Zeppelins power overtook me. That's all I can say.

I'll be sure to pass it on. Unlike Jimmy, she only has my suppoert. She can be stubborn at time, and she tells me, I have to give her a "quick swift kick in the pants" to get her to practice. She does get discouraged, but I'm always there to encourage her. I had a brother and sister who were in a garage band, also. When I tell her about this, her ears perk up. The police never showed up, though. And they were loud. I wish my daughter could find someone to jam with. She and I envy Jimmy and Jeff because they were inseperable when they found each other. She can't jam with her dad, although she says he's very good. He's hardly ever home, that's why.

Good to know you have a lot of support. My daughter and I wish you much success, and I hope we can meet you someday.

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one of the best testimonials i have ever read. who here has not felt the magnetic tug of the zeppelin? rock, i went to your page and listened to your tunes....very nice. i live close so i'm gonna come see you guys soon.

i would continue writing, if i were you.

beat

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Hey man, thanks for the reply. Glad you enjoyed my "essay".... I also still have a copy of Hammer of the Gods. As far as the book being bullshit, was going off of what all the surviving members have said about the book themselves, so I suppose there's no other reason to believe otherwise. Lets just say that if anyone knows what happened in the circle of Led Zeppelin, it's the members themselves and not some guy who was fired by the band. Don't get me wrong, there is probably some truth to the tales, but I think for the most part the stories are out of context and in some way , blown up...as the myth goes on. But yeah, I see where your coming from. I was young when I bought that book, so I believed anything I read about them because they were a mystery to me. If you want a good Zeppelin book try and find "Heaven and Hell" or The Concert Files. There are stories, full concert dates and history of songs in both books. Keep Rockin man!

Rock, I guess you're on to something, given in the light of the fact that the Zep fellas were pretty secretive about things. They would rather leave much to the imagination. They've had that annoying habit of saying "well, did it happen?Neither confirming nor denying. They've got that right and I suppose that is and was an intrinsic part of their personalities. Robert and Jimmy don't mind talking about the music itself but they dodged queries about their personal conduct. We know this much, they were outlaws, without the guns. So why incriminate oneself? They all have (has Jimmy ever been married?) loved ones at home that they wanted protected from certain rumors and again they've got that right. I think it's all cool as long as you love your family. Hedonism, what a decade they had. NOw Robert's all grown up and singing lullabyes with some country singer.(Don't get me wrong, it totally fits. Growing old gracefully). I'm no spring chicken myself but I do enjoy the time-warp myself from time to time to loosen up the soul. One thing I do wish, foolishlly perhaps, but why isn't there better concert footage outside the "Song..." movie? All I've been seeing is obvious bootleg video. If we knew then what we know now. Although the band thrived during my adolescence, I never had a chance to see them live. When I was old enough to go, Bonzo died. Reallly sucked. And so did the entire music industry after that for some time (80's new wave, electronic pop, and even some of the veteran 70's bands got boring.(that means you, Pink Floyd) I have my own opinion on who the heroes turned out to be, but that's another forum.

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I discovered Led Zeppelin around the age of 14. My neighbor (Brian) who was about 10 or 12 years older than me was into music heavily. Every weekend he would be outside washing his new truck, and I would offer to help him. It started to become a weekly ritual, and when I was finished helping him, he would take me around the area we lived and just cruise around. He would turn me on to all this music I had yet to discover. He always had something new playing in his tape deck. My first memories of The Who, Iron Maiden, Rush, Jethro Tull, Motley Crue, Ratt and many others came from the speakers of his truck. I'd always ask ,"who's this??" and he'd tell me the bands name usually followed by a little bit of info on the group. I thought this guy was the coolest. You have to keep in mind that this was the mid-to late 80's and Hair Metal ruled MTV and pop-culture. One day he put a tape in and didn't say a word......."Hey, hey mamma said the way you move, gonna make you sweat, gonna make you groove" poured from the speakers followed by this massive riff that could destroy Satan himslf. I instantly new this was different from anything I had heard in my 14 years of life. I shouted over the music,"Who is this?" Brian answered,"Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest bands ever". I was hooked.

He then played The Rover and once again, the riff blew me away. It was so heavy and musical. I subscibed to one of those music companies that sold tapes and cd's (BMG music). You paid for the first tape and then the others were free and you paid for shipping. Anyone remember? I ordered a few from Rush and ZZ Top and Led Zeppelin IV. I recieved them in the mail a week later and played the hell out of Zep IV until the felt started to fade on the bottom of the tape. Brian also gave me Led Zep II on vinyl around this time. I didn't have a state of the art record player, but there was my little brothers Fisher Price record player with a mini speaker in it, used for playing childrens records, etc. Once I put on the first track I was hooked. The Fisher Price record player was transformed into my own personal escape. Markings of "Zeppelin Rulez" were written all over the tiny white record player. It was now mine. My friends at the time were all into the fad, fashion and music of the day. I tried to turn them on to Zeppelin, but it was over their heads. They didn't understand the musicality of this new band I was introduced to. I slowly became an outsider to my pack of friends and was lightly joked uopn because of my taste in music. But I knew deep down that what I liked was truly music. I knew it was good and it had meaning, passion and soul-which the music of the day lacked completely. Zeppelin was like a revelation to me.

Soon after I started to study and read about them through books and magazines. I would travel 5 miles round trip on my bike to the closest music shop called Acorn Records and Tapes. Every week I would by a new Zeppelin or Zep related album unil my collection was complete. I became obsessed with Zeppelin. They were all I listened to. My parents told me it was okay to listen to music but to be that much into just one band all the time was little over the top. I didn't care. I couldn't get enough of them, and with each album and song I became more fixated on their whole purpose. I bought Hammer of the Gods like every other fool and believed it all, until I realised it was mosltly bullshit years later. With all of this going on at one time, I took an interest in playing guitar. My mom bought me a $99 guitar with a built-in speaker from Sears or something. It took one 9V battery. I joined a music class as an elective in High School and met a bunch of cool guys who were moslty into the same stuff as myself. There were a few Hair Band activist, who I was cool with but never had any real communication with. They didn't like Zep a whole lot, so I didn't care much for them. It's almost as if I didn't really trust or respect them because they didn't like Zeppelin. How could these guys not care for Zeppelin??? Were they insane?. We would have arguments about who was the best band and all that jazz - and at times I became very defensive. I held Zeppelin very close to my heart. They were in a way my savior from all the trash on the radio/TV.

I soon noticed that my talent for playing guitar came very natural to me. I never learned to read music, but I could hear something once or twice and figure out the chords and play it. I formed a band with two other classmates and ironically called the band "Achilles"...go figure. After playing the guitar for a few months , I gained interest in the drums and managed to get a hold of an old Rogers drum set. This was my position in the band. Again, my co-ordination was natural. I became quite good in a short period of time. We wrote our own music, which to this day sounds pretty good. It was more on the metal side of things - like Metallica or Iron Maiden. Achilles did a few talent shows for school and a few parties here and there.

It was now 1989. There were two Classic Rock radio stations at this time who basically played the same stuff. 92.3 "Classic Rock" and WRNO 99.5 "The Rock of New Orleans" On weekends and school nights when I had nothing to do, I would glue myself to the radio and just listen, I would spend hours engulfed in the music coming into my room. As time passed, I was able to name any song on the radio, the artist, the year, the album, etc. You name it, I knew it. This was my HOMEWORK.

A few years passed, as the routine continued. Around the age of 19 or 20 I started to collect bootlegs and managed to aquire a nice size collection. I had boots from every year. Probably 40 concerts in all. By this time my entire room was covered with Zep posters, memorabilia, etc. (which I have all lost since then, due to Hurricane Katrina in 2005) My band had split up and I was looking for a new project to get into. I knew my talents would take me somewhere, and most of all I enjoyed it. A friend of mine was looking to join a group but they needed a bass player, not a drummer. I had always had an interest in bass and now was a good time to try it out. I borrowed a bass from a musical friend and it was just as natural as any other instrument. I was new to the instrument, so I wasn't all that flashy yet, but I knew the notes, which was good enough for now. I was also singing a bit at the time. After a few jam sessions, a new band was formed called "DeJa Vu". We played top 40 classic rock and a few originals.

My love for Zeppelin was still strong, even though I had managed to appreciate other great bands like Rush and Pink Floyd, none of the new music was of interest. Everything I liked was considered "old". (Classic Rock) I also aquired a love for the blues, which again was inspired by my love for Zeppelin. Zeppelin opened my eyes to how music should be composed and arranged- not only how to play.

I was born on October 23rd, 1973. The year Houses of the Holy was released, almost to the day. What better way to celebrate my love, than a permanant mark? Me and a few buddies of mine decided to get a tattoo one evning...Mine.....We'll I had the indide cover of HOTH engraved on my left arm. You know, the pic of the guy holding the adolecent child over his head. Looks exactly like it, except bigger. I brought the album with me that night so the artist couls sketch it out on paper...It looks beautiful to this day...Another reminder of The Zeppelin.....

In 1997, I formed a trio with my brother on drums, a guitar player and myself on bass/vocals called "Three Piece White Meat". The name was hilarious, but we were hungry musicians who played around town consistantly. We did originals with a mix of Zeppelin, Rush and Black Sabbath. We were all heavy into Zeppelin and the guitar players father owned a record shop. The next few years of my life would be spent in and out of this shop, buying anything available from Zeppelin. My collection was getting bigger and bigger. It was good to finally realise at this point that the path I had chosen (musical preference) was indeed a good one, because my like-minded friends all had good taste and had been through that same phase in life. My friends had good taste, and I suppose so did I. It all made sense. All the years I had been teased because of what I had listened to, didn't matter anymore. I knew from an early age that what I embraced was going to shape my life and it did.

In 2000, I had the pleasure of meeting one of my idols. Mr. JPJ at the HOB in New Orleans. He was supporting his Zooma LP. After a fantastic show, I waited outside for 3 hours to meet him. As he came out, I got nervous. I didn't know what to say!!!! After he signed a few autograph I asked him to take a few pics with me and sign a few things. I told him what an impact he had on my life growing up and he seemed really humbled by my comments. He was very polite and easy going. After the pics he said to me "good luck with your music, I hope you do well out there" and he disappeard into the dark ally. I was speechless for days. I couldn't believe I actually met JPJ. It was incredible. My brother and some friends (who also met him that night) were all in a daze for a week or so. Did we just meet The Master of Bass??? Yes, we did.

A year or so later, I formed another Trio called "Endora's Mask" which still exist to this day. You can check out a few tunes at:

http://www.myspace.com/endorasmask

Our Zeppelin influence in subtle but obvious in certain phrasings and arragements. It's very tasteful and unique, which is hard to come by these days. I wouldn't say that we sound like any one band, really. It's a good mix of classic vs. modern. See for yourself. So If you are wondering.....

What does Zeppelin mean to me?.............

Everthing.

They are the most influential rock band of all time.

They have shaped my past, present and future.

And for that, I am very grateful to be who I am today.

Zeppelin Rulez!

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I understand totally,I first heard zep in 1971 at age 11 and i have loved them ever since.Isaw them live in Manchester England in 72 and when they opened with rock and roll it made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up.I saw them 3 years later at earls court London in may 75.Of course they opened with rock and roll again and it had the same effect.I am still listening to them over thirty years later and i never tire of them.I still enjoy other bands,lynyrd skynyrd zz top allman brothers etc,or anyone who can play a mean guitar,but zep will always be my number 1.

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one of the best testimonials i have ever read. who here has not felt the magnetic tug of the zeppelin? rock, i went to your page and listened to your tunes....very nice. i live close so i'm gonna come see you guys soon.

i would continue writing, if i were you.

beat

Thank You for reading my story, and I'm glad you dig it...I could have written more but I wouldn't know when to stop eventually. As far as the tunes go, I appreciate that comment as well. And yes, I will write again as soon as I get up enough words to flow with....only another topic. I don't really wanna use this site to promote my band because I'm here for my love of Zeppelin as I'm sure you are to, but you can check our site for up-coming shows. Come check one out, it would be great to chat with you about music (zeppelin) sometime. Take Care

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Rock, I guess you're on to something, given in the light of the fact that the Zep fellas were pretty secretive about things. They would rather leave much to the imagination. They've had that annoying habit of saying "well, did it happen?Neither confirming nor denying. They've got that right and I suppose that is and was an intrinsic part of their personalities. Robert and Jimmy don't mind talking about the music itself but they dodged queries about their personal conduct. We know this much, they were outlaws, without the guns. So why incriminate oneself? They all have (has Jimmy ever been married?) loved ones at home that they wanted protected from certain rumors and again they've got that right. I think it's all cool as long as you love your family. Hedonism, what a decade they had. NOw Robert's all grown up and singing lullabyes with some country singer.(Don't get me wrong, it totally fits. Growing old gracefully). I'm no spring chicken myself but I do enjoy the time-warp myself from time to time to loosen up the soul. One thing I do wish, foolishlly perhaps, but why isn't there better concert footage outside the "Song..." movie? All I've been seeing is obvious bootleg video. If we knew then what we know now. Although the band thrived during my adolescence, I never had a chance to see them live. When I was old enough to go, Bonzo died. Reallly sucked. And so did the entire music industry after that for some time (80's new wave, electronic pop, and even some of the veteran 70's bands got boring.(that means you, Pink Floyd) I have my own opinion on who the heroes turned out to be, but that's another forum.

Oh, I think they have plenty of footage, but the problem is deciding what to release and what's worthy of the Zeppelin legacy. Take for instance Earl's Court. Only a few tunes were released on the 2003 DVD. I recently got a copy of the full show from the 24th and to be honest it's not that great. It has it's moments but the better part of the show isn't Zep at their best. Mainly Plant's voice is shot to hell but he still manages to give it his all. There are probably a bunch of shows like this but the performance or the quality of the recording may not be up to standards. I have heard alot of talk about how good the 73' European tour was. I'd love to hear some of it one day, "and the wheel rolls on"...!

Edited by Rock Historian

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