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REMEMBER 'Go outside and play'?


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A great area. I know it well.

105th & Edes by the Coliseum.

:unsure:

B)

Yep! That's the place. And alot of fun we had, too. :)

Love your stories about fishing off the piers in SF, BTW. Wonderful.

Thanks for posting that article. It was very interesting for me because I grew up riding the NYC subways with impunity during the 60's and 70's. I was taught/learned to be street smart at a young age - I always carried "mug money" (although I was never mugged), sat next to women with children on the subway, didn't make eye contact with strangers, avoided isolated and uncrowded areas, never cut through a park with trees or overgrown foliage, etc. I started to go alone to the Village and to concerts before I was 12 years old and I never encountered any problems. I was lucky but I also think that I survived unscathed because I always had my wits about me. I also think that, at least back then, concerts were some of the safest places to be because the streets were always crowded and the venues were filled with thousands of other kids.

My husband had what I would describe as an idyllic childhood. He grew up in a "picture pretty" suburban town, riding his bike everywhere (including swim clubs and tennis clubs), building tree forts in the then-undeveloped woods, skating on frozen ponds in the winter, fishing in those same ponds in the summer, etc. He really had the best of both worlds because, when small town life seemed too stifling, he took the train into the city.

When we were away this weekend, my husband and I were discussing how we think that, given our own experiences and the experiences of our friends, life in 70's NYC was not as dangerous as the media now portray it. Who knows? Perhaps it was but we just saw it that way because we were not harmed and also because we now remember it through the rose-colored glasses of childhood.

That's really cool. You had your street smarts and that's what you needed. The whole world was not off limits.

This so reminds me of the scene in "Bowling for Columbine," where Michael Moore and his friend are standing on a street corner in South Central LA, right in the middle of where the media says two white men should not be safe. They're fine of course. However, Moore points out that the media rarely says a thing about the really unsafe condition, which is the smoggy air they're breathing.

I think it really is a media-driven thing, this wide-spread paranoia. Kill your TV...

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Going a bit off-topic at isn't isn't related to growing up, but how times have changed... I went out for a few beers on Saturday afternoon and was in a 'major chain' of bars in the UK. We were served Beer in plastic glasses... Plastic glasses??? What's the world coming to?? Apparently it's their policy now. Are we the last generation of glass drinkers? At least I will be able hold my head up high whilst telling my grandchildren about drinking out of dangerous glass drinking vessels as they look on in disbelief!!!

Is this nonsense happening anywhere else in Zepland???

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Yep! That's the place. And alot of fun we had, too. :)

That's really cool. You had your street smarts and that's what you needed. The whole world was not off limits.

This so reminds me of the scene in "Bowling for Columbine," where Michael Moore and his friend are standing on a street corner in South Central LA, right in the middle of where the media says two white men should not be safe. They're fine of course. However, Moore points out that the media rarely says a thing about the really unsafe condition, which is the smoggy air they're breathing.

I think it really is a media-driven thing, this wide-spread paranoia. Kill your TV...

When it came to street smarts, I did have what I needed. I told you I could take care of myself. ;)

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Going a bit off-topic at isn't isn't related to growing up, but how times have changed... I went out for a few beers on Saturday afternoon and was in a 'major chain' of bars in the UK. We were served Beer in plastic glasses... Plastic glasses??? What's the world coming to??

It must be because of all you football hooligans raising hell! :lol:

Glass is still used in finer establishments here in the US. They only have golf on the TV screens.

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:beer:

I see so many kids that have absolutely no street smarts at all these day's. They have no sense of what is going on around them and react like they've been shot out of a cannon when something as simple as a car goes by. They are not being well served by they're parents. They should be out playing in the park. street , baseball diamond or just about anywhere that they can have some real fun. Organized sports and activities can come later.... I'm affraid all too often, they've become babysitting services too

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I see so many kids that have absolutely no street smarts at all these day's. They have no sense of what is going on around them and react like they've been shot out of a cannon when something as simple as a car goes by. They are not being well served by they're parents. They should be out playing in the park. street , baseball diamond or just about anywhere that they can have some real fun. Organized sports and activities can come later.... I'm affraid all too often, they've become babysitting services too

We've really tried to raise our kids to be independent and have some street smarts. They spent a good part of their formative years living in the developing world with us and that helped spare them from living the overprotected/oversheltered lives of many of their American peers. Our oldest daughter said that when she went away to college, she couldn't believe how sheltered so many of the other students had been. For example, there were so many freshman who had never done their own laundry that the dorm RA's had to hold workshops on how to use a washer and dryer. :rolleyes:

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We've really tried to raise our kids to be independent and have some street smarts. They spent a good part of their formative years living in the developing world with us and that helped spare them from living the overprotected/oversheltered lives of many of their American peers. Our oldest daughter said that when she went away to college, she couldn't believe how sheltered so many of the other students had been. For example, there were so many freshman who had never done their own laundry that the dorm RA's had to hold workshops on how to use a washer and dryer. :rolleyes:

I can believe that alright. I do try to be as understanding as I can with some people when it comes to this subject but I find it frustrating. I'm not trying to say that we did everything right, but I will say that we alway's made an honest effort. Both our sons can cook, do housework etc and at the same time, they can rip an engine apart and rebuild it. They learned alought from us but most of they're car skills etc came from hanging out with they're buds and dreaming about hot cars. You can't replace interaction with other kids and the results that come from that. There will be some hair raising experiences :D but the good far out weighs the bad

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Great topic. Remember summer vacation? I got on my bike in the morning and didn't come back until suppertime. I would stop off at my friend's houses, and we'd ride to the river and swim. If we had a few bucks we'd go to Dairy Queen. The freedom was wonderful. When my daughter was about 10, I really felt bad that she didn't have that. My mom was at home, but I'm a single mom and have to work. So, my daughter's always been in summer activities. I suppose I could have let her just hang out, but I was afraid to. I think I might be one of those paranoid parents!

I've noticed in my apartment complex that the people who have recently come from other countries are more like we used to be with that stuff. Their kids are always outside playing soccer or riding their bikes. Mine's on the computer or I'm driving her to an activity. Sigh.

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I always rant over what kids don't do these days, too - but must admit that we did get into some mischief as kids, on our own. We sure threw alot of stuff at everything and anyone we could, and I mean rocks and dog poop. Maybe these planned and supervised activities aren't the worst thing, at least some of the time. I was put to work in the various family members' yards alot, and do seem to enjoy gardening and any type of outdoor chores nowadays...

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Very cool, MSG.

Great topic. Remember summer vacation? I got on my bike in the morning and didn't come back until suppertime. I would stop off at my friend's houses, and we'd ride to the river and swim. If we had a few bucks we'd go to Dairy Queen. The freedom was wonderful. When my daughter was about 10, I really felt bad that she didn't have that. My mom was at home, but I'm a single mom and have to work. So, my daughter's always been in summer activities. I suppose I could have let her just hang out, but I was afraid to. I think I might be one of those paranoid parents!

I've noticed in my apartment complex that the people who have recently come from other countries are more like we used to be with that stuff. Their kids are always outside playing soccer or riding their bikes. Mine's on the computer or I'm driving her to an activity. Sigh.

Suz, why do you think you are afraid? I'm really curious how this change came about, when did people's thinking change?

I suspect some of it is the guilt trip laid on parents... if anything happened to your kids it's all your fault for not keeping them under wraps, that kind of thing. Also, it would be hard to say "go out and play and (please dear lord don't come back until dinner)" ;) if yours is the only child out wandering around, I imagine.

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Great topic. Remember summer vacation? I got on my bike in the morning and didn't come back until suppertime. I would stop off at my friend's houses, and we'd ride to the river and swim. If we had a few bucks we'd go to Dairy Queen. The freedom was wonderful. When my daughter was about 10, I really felt bad that she didn't have that. My mom was at home, but I'm a single mom and have to work. So, my daughter's always been in summer activities. I suppose I could have let her just hang out, but I was afraid to. I think I might be one of those paranoid parents!

I've noticed in my apartment complex that the people who have recently come from other countries are more like we used to be with that stuff. Their kids are always outside playing soccer or riding their bikes. Mine's on the computer or I'm driving her to an activity. Sigh.

Suz, circumstance has eveything to do with it. As I said on an ealier post, I have been fortunate. Your daughter by the sounds of it is getting social interaction and these day's, the computer is just the way of things. If my kids were little today, I'd be facing the same dilema :D It is the sign of the times. From my selfish point of view, I want to be able to take my grandchildren out fishing, to the park etc and not have it be a totally new experience for them. I've alway's believed that those who have it within they're means to do things....should. It can set a tone for everyone and make it much easier for everyone else to participate

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Interesting topic! I thought I'd share this with you all; it's one of those things that get sent around by email. It's fairly light hearted, but there's a real ring of truth in some of it. Hope it makes you smile!

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE KIDS WHO WERE BORN IN THE

1930's, 1940's, 50's, 60's and 70's !!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while

they carried us.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a tin, and didn't

get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cots were covered with bright colored

lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when

we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took

hitchhiking ..

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

Riding in the back of a van - loose - was always great fun.

We drank water from the garden hosepipe and NOT from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE

actually died from this.

We ate cakes, white bread and real butter and drank pop with sugar in it,

but we weren't overweight because......

WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were

back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride

down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into

the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem .

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all,

no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no

mobile phones, no text messaging, no personal computers, no Internet or

Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found

them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no

lawsuits/legal actions from these accidents

We played with worms (well most boys did) and mud pies made from dirt, and

the worms did not live in us forever.

Made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it

would happen, we did not poke out any eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or

rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

Local teams had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't

had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of.

They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers

and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!

And YOU are one of them!

CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up

as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our

own good.

And while you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how

brave their parents were.

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Yes I sure do remember going out to play. All day. And it was before the days of cell phones so, my parents didn't call and ask me to come home. I knew when I had to be home and it was my responsibility to get there on time. It's my opinion that there's something inherently wrong with calling your own child and asking them to come home. Please. It's called curfew for a reason.

Edited by Kat24
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Interesting topic! I thought I'd share this with you all; it's one of those things that get sent around by email. It's fairly light hearted, but there's a real ring of truth in some of it. Hope it makes you smile!

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE KIDS WHO WERE BORN IN THE

1930's, 1940's, 50's, 60's and 70's !!

--------------------(me)-----------------------

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while

they carried us.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a tin, and didn't

get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cots were covered with bright colored

lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when

we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took

hitchhiking ..

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

Riding in the back of a van - loose - was always great fun.

We drank water from the garden hosepipe and NOT from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE

actually died from this.

We ate cakes, white bread and real butter and drank pop with sugar in it,

but we weren't overweight because......

WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were

back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride

down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into

the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem .

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all,

no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no

mobile phones, no text messaging, no personal computers, no Internet or

Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found

them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no

lawsuits/legal actions from these accidents

We played with worms (well most boys did) and mud pies made from dirt, and

the worms did not live in us forever.

Made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it

would happen, we did not poke out any eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or

rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

Local teams had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't

had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of.

They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers

and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!

And YOU are one of them!

CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up

as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our

own good.

And while you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how

brave their parents were.

That's it in a nutshell. :thumbsup:

One time I was going down a long hill by USF in San Fran on one of those Flexy-Flyers on wheels and I didn't know where the brakes were. I was going so fast that I flipped and slid down the street and got all tore up. I walked/limped the Flexy home to get all bandaged up but was out there again not too long afterwards. :D

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I can believe that alright. I do try to be as understanding as I can with some people when it comes to this subject but I find it frustrating. I'm not trying to say that we did everything right, but I will say that we alway's made an honest effort. Both our sons can cook, do housework etc and at the same time, they can rip an engine apart and rebuild it. They learned alought from us but most of they're car skills etc came from hanging out with they're buds and dreaming about hot cars. You can't replace interaction with other kids and the results that come from that. There will be some hair raising experiences :D but the good far out weighs the bad

Good points. I understand what you mean by "honest effort" - we've tried to do the same. I think that there are some people who never "get" it. We do our best to raise our children with love, protect them from danger (as far as we can), and teach them the skills they need to survive in the world. Unfortunately, we can't protect them from everything that they're going to encounter in this world so teaching them things like "street smarts", common sense, and life skills will benefit our kids much more than overprotecting them and trying to shelter them from the real world. I think that some of those "hair raising experiences" we've all had - and survived - were an important part of growing up.

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Interesting topic! I thought I'd share this with you all; it's one of those things that get sent around by email. It's fairly light hearted, but there's a real ring of truth in some of it. Hope it makes you smile!

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE KIDS WHO WERE BORN IN THE

1930's, 1940's, 50's, 60's and 70's !!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while

they carried us.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a tin, and didn't

get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cots were covered with bright colored

lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when

we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took

hitchhiking ..

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

Riding in the back of a van - loose - was always great fun.

We drank water from the garden hosepipe and NOT from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE

actually died from this.

We ate cakes, white bread and real butter and drank pop with sugar in it,

but we weren't overweight because......

WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were

back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride

down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into

the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem .

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all,

no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no

mobile phones, no text messaging, no personal computers, no Internet or

Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found

them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no

lawsuits/legal actions from these accidents

We played with worms (well most boys did) and mud pies made from dirt, and

the worms did not live in us forever.

Made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it

would happen, we did not poke out any eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or

rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

Local teams had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't

had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of.

They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers

and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!

And YOU are one of them!

CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up

as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our

own good.

And while you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how

brave their parents were.

Great list, Lilith! I remember living through many of those things. Our "seatbelt" (when we were riding in the front seat) was an adult's arm reflexively pushing us back to prevent us from being thrown forward when the breaks were slammed on.

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Great list, Lilith! I remember living through many of those things. Our "seatbelt" (when we were riding in the front seat) was an adult's arm reflexively pushing us back to prevent us from being thrown forward when the breaks were slammed on.

And sometimes, it didn't work :D No wonder I lool the way I do

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Good points. I understand what you mean by "honest effort" - we've tried to do the same. I think that there are some people who never "get" it. We do our best to raise our children with love, protect them from danger (as far as we can), and teach them the skills they need to survive in the world. Unfortunately, we can't protect them from everything that they're going to encounter in this world so teaching them things like "street smarts", common sense, and life skills will benefit our kids much more than overprotecting them and trying to shelter them from the real world. I think that some of those "hair raising experiences" we've all had - and survived - were an important part of growing up.

That's it in a nutshell. Thank goodness for parents like you and Ally and your partners!

My husband can change the oil in the car, build things, fix stuff, cook, do laundry, and iron his own clothes. I don't have a ton of affection for his mom but I must say she did teach him what he needed to know to be self-sufficient.

Great list, Lilith! I remember living through many of those things. Our "seatbelt" (when we were riding in the front seat) was an adult's arm reflexively pushing us back to prevent us from being thrown forward when the breaks were slammed on.

:lol: Yes, exactly!

That's it in a nutshell. :thumbsup:

One time I was going down a long hill by USF in San Fran on one of those Flexy-Flyers on wheels and I didn't know where the brakes were. I was going so fast that I flipped and slid down the street and got all tore up. I walked/limped the Flexy home to get all bandaged up but was out there again not too long afterwards. :D

Freedom with scrapes, bruises and frights is much better than no freedom at all.

Did you grow up right there by Kezar?

Here's a brave little Kookmeyer...

nike.jpg

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Freedom with scrapes, bruises and frights is much better than no freedom at all.

Did you grow up right there by Kezar?

Yes! I went to Poly High that was right across the street. Saw a couple of early 49er games there too as a kid. :D

Here's a brave little Kookmeyer...

nike.jpg

Reminds me of Douglas Street right off 17th St. where we used to wax up hardboard real estate signs and slide down the hill. We ended up under cars and everything. :D

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Yes! I went to Poly High that was right across the street. Saw a couple of early 49er games there too as a kid. :D

Reminds me of Douglas Street right off 17th St. where we used to wax up hardboard real estate signs and slide down the hill. We ended up under cars and everything. :D

I grew up in the East Bay, where we'd slide down hillsides on flattened card board. Got the nastiest case of poison oak all over once, doing that. Never occurred to us to steal real estate signs, much less wax them, LOL! Brilliant. (I wonder, is it too late? "Mommy, why is that lady sliding down a hill on a real estate sign?")

I got my wisdom teeth out at the dental school at USF, went to several concerts at Kezar, know the area pretty well. No offense intended, but if you saw the Niners at Kezar, you are an old timer. B) Did you see Zep there?

I wonder what the odds are that you and I attended concerts together in the 70s?

Back on topic, it strikes me that lots of these stories begin with "We got on our bikes in the morning..." Do kids still go exploring on their bicycles like that? (I hope so.)

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I remember riding my bike around the neighborhood, playing in the park, swimming in the pool, roller skating (blading later on), family trips to the beach, ice skating, playing basket ball in the driveway. Those were the good old days.

Sure we had video games like NES, SNES SEGA, Nintendo 64, etc but they didn't completely rule our lives. It was a nice balance.

When I have kids I'm going to teach them to be independent.

As far as cell phones go, they will get a chaperone type one. No way I'm I going shell out $200 so my nine/ten year old can have a blackberry or iPhone.

A bit off topic: Does anyone remember tether-ball? Elementary PE isn't the same without it.

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Very cool, MSG.

Suz, why do you think you are afraid? I'm really curious how this change came about, when did people's thinking change?

I suspect some of it is the guilt trip laid on parents... if anything happened to your kids it's all your fault for not keeping them under wraps, that kind of thing. Also, it would be hard to say "go out and play and (please dear lord don't come back until dinner)" ;) if yours is the only child out wandering around, I imagine.

I don't know. I know that I seem to be in the middle, when it comes to her friend's parents. These girls are in high school, and one friend's mom calls her REPEATEDLY on her cell if she can't see them out the window!!! They hang out at the park across from her house and she has to SEE them!!!!! She drives her daughter 5 blocks to school every day. Unfrickinbelievable. That lady needs to get a job. These girls do well in school and are invloved in a lot of activities; they're not troublemakers.

But she has another friend whose mom acts like her personal assistant and takes her anywhere, anytime, for any reason at any cost, because if she does'nt the kid will go off on her and she can't handle it. One time I told her if my daughter talked to me the way her daughter talks to her, her ass would be on the other side of the room in a heartbeat.

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Suz, circumstance has eveything to do with it. As I said on an ealier post, I have been fortunate. Your daughter by the sounds of it is getting social interaction and these day's, the computer is just the way of things. If my kids were little today, I'd be facing the same dilema :D It is the sign of the times. From my selfish point of view, I want to be able to take my grandchildren out fishing, to the park etc and not have it be a totally new experience for them. I've alway's believed that those who have it within they're means to do things....should. It can set a tone for everyone and make it much easier for everyone else to participate

Very good points. I guess I have to admit that being a single mom of an only child makes me paranoid and overprotective sometimes. But you know what? My best friend when I was a kid was an only child of a single mom, and she went on all those bike rides with me, and was unsupervised all summer. She was very responsible, and did chores and stuff before she went out. My 16 year old practically has to be threatened with death to do chores.

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