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Kentuckygirl

Rumors in Nashville

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As has been said by others in various threads, many Led Zeppelin fans do not like this recent direction Robert has taken. And as popular as Alison would be in Nashville, to sell out 20,000 tickets would be a stretch even for her. I could be wrong though, we'll see by July 19.

Better watch that country Ham and bisquits at Loveless, they have quite the reputation. All over the US in fact. Celebrity sightings are a dime-a-dozen in Nashville, the locals there don't pay much attention. It's a daily occurence from what I've heard and well, seen.

You are correct about sightings being a dime a dozen. The problem with me is that I do not follow country music so I would not recognize these people if they were standing beside me. Many of my officemates met RP last fall and have the cellphone photos to prove it. I am not that lucky. The only celebrity I have met is Eli Manning. Also, in Williamson county where I live, it is not considered "cool" to approach them. In my Welcome wagon basket there was actually a brochure entitled "being a good neighbor in Williamson county" that strongly discourages you from approaching celebrities so "they will continue to make Williamson County their home". LOL!

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Considering they're playing at an arena that holds nearly 20,000 for a concert my thought is that there will be tickets available the day of the show. I may be wrong, but that's my projection.

So I'll most likely "come on down" and see about getting in then.

Perhaps you should check that. I saw them at a largish venue in Birmingham England but it was partitioned so not all the tickets were on sale. Wouldn't want you to travel and be disappointed.

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Perhaps you should check that. I saw them at a largish venue in Birmingham England but it was partitioned so not all the tickets were on sale. Wouldn't want you to travel and be disappointed.

There are still tickets available for the Nashville show.

Tickets for Nashville

Yeah, as I recall, they said they were already working on some things for round two.

But, IMHO, I would imagine Union Station is gonna want their mama back.

ANOTHER R&A tour??? :(

I for one hope NOT.

I feel bad for SS and Union Station. I heard they're "busy" but c'mon, I'm sure they don't want to be left behind forever.

Maybe an R&A/SSensation/UStation Caravan with Guest Appearances?

Edited by eternal light

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An article that was posted on another great site leaves little doubt a reunion is not in the offing:

Originally appeared in The News and Observer (North Carolina)

By David Menconi

It took Robert Plant a mere instant to determine that his collaboration with Alison Krauss was going to work. On paper, it’s a profoundly odd pairing — frontman for uber-metal superstars Led Zeppelin, pure-voiced bluegrass goddess — but they teamed up to sing a 2004 Leadbelly tribute at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Improbably, sparks flew.

“The minute she came through the door of the rehearsal room and hailed me, I knew immediately there was no messin’ about,” Plant says, calling from Phoenix. “I already knew what her talent was like, immense. But having heard her records, I didn’t know if she could come out of that stricture and go with the music. And she did just that. She was this strong but gentle and very focused woman.”

That began one of the most unexpectedly successful collaborations of recent memory. Three years after that initial meeting, Plant and Krauss teamed up to record “Raising Sand” (Rounder Records), which debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard charts last October — higher than either has ever reached as a solo act.

T-Bone Burnett, best known as musical ringleader of 2000’s “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” soundtrack, produced “Raising Sand.” It’s a peculiar hybrid of strange, spooky country-noir that seems to inhabit a parallel galaxy, centered on that incongruous combination of voices. The song selections span more than 50 years, from Doc Watson to the Everly Brothers, Tom Waits to Townes Van Zant.

Burnett also oversees the backup band for the tour, which plays in Raleigh tonight. Plant is nothing short of rhapsodic about the live shows. It sounds as if he’s having the time of his life.

“It’s come to so much more fruition since the days of the album,” Plant says. “Live, it’s way more exciting. She’ll grasp these bits and pieces of little ad-libs I do, hit the harmony, stay with it and ride these long blue notes — then blink like Lucille Ball: ‘What just happened?’ She’s modified her harmony singing, as have I, and she’s really starting to become Etta James at times. Yet beneath it all is still that crystalline, celestial voice of hers. It’s great fun.”

In retrospect, Krauss and Plant’s dual worlds share just enough points in common for their pairing to make sense. Led Zeppelin always had a folky side (”That’s the Way”), and Plant’s knowledge of American roots music is impressively deep. Plant’s old Zeppelin bandmate John Paul Jones has also been a Merlefest regular for years. Krauss, meanwhile, is not above the occasional unexpected pop-song cover (Michael McDonald’s “I Can Let Go Now” on her 1997 album “So Long So Wrong”).

Of course, people come to the shows wanting to hear what Plant and Krauss will do with Led Zeppelin songs. “Black Dog,” “Hey Hey What Can I Do,” “The Battle of Evermore” and “Black Country Woman” are among the Zeppelin songs they’ve been covering.

“It’s way different,” Plant says. “Alison brings a really different look and feel to the thing. You hear shrieks from the crowd on those songs, especially the women. She really mutates those songs, makes them a lot more sultry.”

The album and tour have gone well enough that a sequel seems inevitable. Plant says the process is already under way, informally.

“We’re looking at material, writing bits and pieces of things as we go on,” he says. “Grooves appear during soundtrack, and we note them. ‘Raising Sand’ crossed several different idioms and classifications of music, and we’ll do more of that. Categories are such a bind, so unnecessary. It’s all about catalysm, a guy bringing one thing to a party that causes an effect and turns something into a mutated form.”

As an example, Plant cites multi-instrumentalist Stuart Duncan from the touring band.

“He’s one of the most renowned fiddle players in Nashville, and he sounds about as North African as you can imagine right now,” Plant says with something like glee. “I’ll hit these quarter-turn gliding bits I learned in Timbuktu, and everybody just joins right in. The rhythms change, shift. Everybody’s coming to the party with lots of good ideas. The impromptu aspect really keeps me satisfied.”

As it stands now, it’s far more likely that you’ll see another Plant/Krauss album than Plant onstage again with his old Led Zeppelin bandmates. A one-off reunion show in London last December kicked the rumor mill into overdrive.

Plant, however, shows no interest. Told that there’s a Web site already taking bids on Led Zeppelin reunion tickets, Plant’s tone cools perceptibly.

“I wouldn’t subscribe to that,” he says wearily. “You know, I work and work and work and work and work, and I have good intentions. And sometimes, it’s very simple, the way the media will manipulate an idea or a story. In the end, a lot of artists are moved into spaces they do not need to go by the force of others’ opinions. Every dog has his day. I had a wonderful time with the guys in December. But right now, this is what I’m doing, and it’s spectacular and a joy. In my time and my career, joy is the greatest commodity that I have.”

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An article that was posted on another great site leaves little doubt a reunion is not in the offing:

Originally appeared in The News and Observer (North Carolina)

By David Menconi

It took Robert Plant a mere instant to determine that his collaboration with Alison Krauss was going to work. On paper, it's a profoundly odd pairing — frontman for uber-metal superstars Led Zeppelin, pure-voiced bluegrass goddess — but they teamed up to sing a 2004 Leadbelly tribute at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Improbably, sparks flew.

"The minute she came through the door of the rehearsal room and hailed me, I knew immediately there was no messin' about," Plant says, calling from Phoenix. "I already knew what her talent was like, immense. But having heard her records, I didn't know if she could come out of that stricture and go with the music. And she did just that. She was this strong but gentle and very focused woman."

That began one of the most unexpectedly successful collaborations of recent memory. Three years after that initial meeting, Plant and Krauss teamed up to record "Raising Sand" (Rounder Records), which debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard charts last October — higher than either has ever reached as a solo act.

T-Bone Burnett, best known as musical ringleader of 2000's "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, produced "Raising Sand." It's a peculiar hybrid of strange, spooky country-noir that seems to inhabit a parallel galaxy, centered on that incongruous combination of voices. The song selections span more than 50 years, from Doc Watson to the Everly Brothers, Tom Waits to Townes Van Zant.

Burnett also oversees the backup band for the tour, which plays in Raleigh tonight. Plant is nothing short of rhapsodic about the live shows. It sounds as if he's having the time of his life.

"It's come to so much more fruition since the days of the album," Plant says. "Live, it's way more exciting. She'll grasp these bits and pieces of little ad-libs I do, hit the harmony, stay with it and ride these long blue notes — then blink like Lucille Ball: 'What just happened?' She's modified her harmony singing, as have I, and she's really starting to become Etta James at times. Yet beneath it all is still that crystalline, celestial voice of hers. It's great fun."

In retrospect, Krauss and Plant's dual worlds share just enough points in common for their pairing to make sense. Led Zeppelin always had a folky side ("That's the Way"), and Plant's knowledge of American roots music is impressively deep. Plant's old Zeppelin bandmate John Paul Jones has also been a Merlefest regular for years. Krauss, meanwhile, is not above the occasional unexpected pop-song cover (Michael McDonald's "I Can Let Go Now" on her 1997 album "So Long So Wrong").

Of course, people come to the shows wanting to hear what Plant and Krauss will do with Led Zeppelin songs. "Black Dog," "Hey Hey What Can I Do," "The Battle of Evermore" and "Black Country Woman" are among the Zeppelin songs they've been covering.

"It's way different," Plant says. "Alison brings a really different look and feel to the thing. You hear shrieks from the crowd on those songs, especially the women. She really mutates those songs, makes them a lot more sultry."

The album and tour have gone well enough that a sequel seems inevitable. Plant says the process is already under way, informally.

"We're looking at material, writing bits and pieces of things as we go on," he says. "Grooves appear during soundtrack, and we note them. 'Raising Sand' crossed several different idioms and classifications of music, and we'll do more of that. Categories are such a bind, so unnecessary. It's all about catalysm, a guy bringing one thing to a party that causes an effect and turns something into a mutated form."

As an example, Plant cites multi-instrumentalist Stuart Duncan from the touring band.

"He's one of the most renowned fiddle players in Nashville, and he sounds about as North African as you can imagine right now," Plant says with something like glee. "I'll hit these quarter-turn gliding bits I learned in Timbuktu, and everybody just joins right in. The rhythms change, shift. Everybody's coming to the party with lots of good ideas. The impromptu aspect really keeps me satisfied."

As it stands now, it's far more likely that you'll see another Plant/Krauss album than Plant onstage again with his old Led Zeppelin bandmates. A one-off reunion show in London last December kicked the rumor mill into overdrive.

Plant, however, shows no interest. Told that there's a Web site already taking bids on Led Zeppelin reunion tickets, Plant's tone cools perceptibly.

"I wouldn't subscribe to that," he says wearily. "You know, I work and work and work and work and work, and I have good intentions. And sometimes, it's very simple, the way the media will manipulate an idea or a story. In the end, a lot of artists are moved into spaces they do not need to go by the force of others' opinions. Every dog has his day. I had a wonderful time with the guys in December. But right now, this is what I'm doing, and it's spectacular and a joy. In my time and my career, joy is the greatest commodity that I have."

I'm assuming this was in Fridays edition of the N&O which I missed, regretably....But I was at the concert Friday night. Amazing! You can see the sparks fly between the two of them on stage and you can see that he truely is happy about where the road has taken him. I for one am happy for him.

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I'm assuming this was in Fridays edition of the N&O which I missed, regretably....But I was at the concert Friday night. Amazing! You can see the sparks fly between the two of them on stage and you can see that he truely is happy about where the road has taken him. I for one am happy for him.

I grew up deep in Appalachia surrounded by banjos, fiddles, and twang. I almost got hit by lightning up on the roof of my house in 1977 trying to adjust the FM antenna to pull in radio stations from Lexington and Knoxville so I could enjoy Led Zeppelin and other bands and get away from fiddles, banjos, etc. I left for college and tuned Bluegrass out completely until T-Bone produced Oh Brother. I do not understand what Robert is doing. I respect his right as an artist to pursue this and I will support him by seeing one more show, however I still do not understand this path he has chosen. He must be bored and trying new things. I do not think anything he has said completely 100% rules out future Zeppelin reunions. We will just have to wait and see.

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I grew up deep in Appalachia surrounded by banjos, fiddles, and twang. I almost got hit by lightning up on the roof of my house in 1977 trying to adjust the FM antenna to pull in radio stations from Lexington and Knoxville so I could enjoy Led Zeppelin and other bands and get away from fiddles, banjos, etc. I left for college and tuned Bluegrass out completely until T-Bone produced Oh Brother. I do not understand what Robert is doing. I respect his right as an artist to pursue this and I will support him by seeing one more show, however I still do not understand this path he has chosen. He must be bored and trying new things. I do not think anything he has said completely 100% rules out future Zeppelin reunions. We will just have to wait and see.

I wouldn't say it was boredom driving him to try new things but a real desire to challenge himself and explore things he's not done before.

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I grew up deep in Appalachia surrounded by banjos, fiddles, and twang. I almost got hit by lightning up on the roof of my house in 1977 trying to adjust the FM antenna to pull in radio stations from Lexington and Knoxville so I could enjoy Led Zeppelin and other bands and get away from fiddles, banjos, etc. I left for college and tuned Bluegrass out completely until T-Bone produced Oh Brother. I do not understand what Robert is doing. I respect his right as an artist to pursue this and I will support him by seeing one more show, however I still do not understand this path he has chosen. He must be bored and trying new things. I do not think anything he has said completely 100% rules out future Zeppelin reunions. We will just have to wait and see.

Well that is something we have in common. I grew up less than an hour away from the Appalachain mountains. My uncle had his own bluegrass band that was instrumental in creating the fiddler's convetion in NC. I grew up being "forced" to listen to bluegrass and country. It wasn't until many years later when I heard the likes of bands like Alison Krauss and Union Station and Nickle Creek that I developed an appreciation for bluegrass. I can understand why Robert is doing it. Variety is the spice of life. He has said himself that to do the same thing over and over again for the rest of your career is tiresome....Not in those exact words, mind you.

Don't get me wrong, I ADORE Led Zeppelin and would be thrilled to no end to hear that a tour was set in stone.....But I'm not going to let it ruin my appreciation for Robert if it doesn't happen.

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