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Laughter

Things Zeppelin Invented.

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And Who Played Guitar on that? All I know is that Mr Davies Never played the solo that way again, and that solo does sound a lot like late 60's page.

The Solo was always the point of contention the Riff was Page.

Jimmy Page plays tambourine on that track, not guitar.

RB

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Bonzo's drum sound was unique on their first few albums.

No one had this bombastic and clear sound Bonzo had.

His playing is up to now still unique

The use of laser lights at their concerts.

The first and only band, to my knowledge, that split up after a member died.

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The greasy wet spot in many womens knickers :blink::blink: Of course I'm sure we all have had a handle, errrrrr grasp, ummmmmmm, damn I get in deeper uhhhh gentlemen get me outta this tight spot :blink::blink: ? I mean hole.... darn it.

Rolls>>> :wacko:

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Maybe not invented but were the first to throw televisions out of the hotel window, fish out of the hotel window, and the "Power Ballad".

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Maybe not invented but were the first to throw televisions out of the hotel window, fish out of the hotel window, and the "Power Ballad".

How about the Ketchup Incident? Where they scrogged that bird with the Mudsharkie? That has to be a new one on the world.

Baby did you know you smell like fish? Whewwweeee.

Rolls>>> :wacko:

Edited by ledzeprolls

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How about the Ketchup Incident? Where they scrogged that bird with the Mudsharkie? That has to be a new one on the world.

Baby did you know you smell like fish? Whewwweeee.

Rolls>>> :wacko:

:hysterical:

Edited by ZEPPHAN

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5. Using multiple mics to record a single source. This includes placing the mic at different distances. Using different brands and types of mics to record the same source (example on a 4x12 cab, you might have an sm57 on one speaker, a Sennheiser mic on another, and bass drum mic on a third speaker, and something else on the fourth. So one might take 8-12 tracks to record one guitar passage.

this is the technical explanation but what you are really talking about is the capturing the ambiance of the room where the music was performed to create a more realistic performance.

Simple reverb colors the sound. It adds depth and echo but it still colors the sound. This is what gives rockabilly and surf music its flavor. The reverb is cool but it is not natural to the performance. It is an instrument unto itself.

Jimmy knew that to convey the excitement of the performance it had to sound as natural as possible. He wanted the music to sound as if the band was right there with you. Stereophonic and quadraphonic techniques were not enough. The essence of the room had to be captured and the only way to do it was to blend the recordings from multiple places in the room.

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Jimmy knew that to convey the excitement of the performance it had to sound as natural as possible. He wanted the music to sound as if the band was right there with you. Stereophonic and quadraphonic techniques were not enough. The essence of the room had to be captured and the only way to do it was to blend the recordings from multiple places in the room.

This was done really well on -presence... you can picture the whole band playing, with the sound they got on that record.

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Jimmy Page wasn't the first to violin bow a guitar, there were plenty of other guitarists doing it before him and that's where Jimmy learned it from.

Eddie Phillips, for one.

RB

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The violin bow reminds me of the views on -sth in a way... they were just one aspect of -zeppelin. I guess its the -fifth element, as they put it, which is the most interesting. Its the thing that was there even when playing old cover songs... the band's sound.

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made use of MXR Phase 90 2 years before Van Halen

Used an Eventide Harmonizer's ability to pitch shift to created a makeshift Pitch shift effect for his knebworth guitar solo. 12 years later Digitech made their first Whammy(Pitch Shift)Pedal.

First there was PRINCE, then he was know as a symbol, then when was untitled. I think that pretty much cover Led Zeppelin's Fourth Album. You know, the one that is untitled. The one where each member is represented by a symbol.

Jimmy Pioneered the concept of double tracking guitar parts (acoustic in particular) using alternate tunings for each track. For an example you would record a track on an acoustic guitar, then you tune the guitar differently and record the same passage of music and layer it over the first. This adds depth to the track because the acoustic will resonate differently in the different tunings.

Created the full concept of the Guitar army which includes.

1. Double Tracking - playing the same thing multiple times and layering it.

2. creating an orchestral arrangement of many guitar passages.

3. Creating a DI track of a guitar passage on a spare track then running that spare track into other amps/cabs/effects then layering the new track into the song.

4. splitting the signal out of the guitar and running into multiple amp and cabinet configurations and then simultaneously recording them onto individual tracks.

5. Using multiple mics to record a single source. This includes placing the mic at different distances. Using different brands and types of mics to record the same source (example on a 4x12 cab, you might have an sm57 on one speaker, a Sennheiser mic on another, and bass drum mic on a third speaker, and something else on the fourth. So one might take 8-12 tracks to record one guitar passage. Coverdale/Page was recorded in part at a studio in Reno because it featured a 72 track console. of which Page used most of the available tracks

Thanks for that, I love those type of answers! Very interesting, esp. how he would record a passage again with a different tuning.

As for heavy metal, the only ever sounded (slightly) like that to me on Coda. Page worked on it post-Zeppelin and it shows. Some of what he added in the early 80's sounds a bit cheesy and metalish. I find he stared to lean on the sound of the Zep imitators somewhat during this period, the classic rock sound. HE seems to have re-worked the drums here to sound a bit splashy. Listen to the end of We're Gonna Groove from Coda to me it sounds a bit metal-y.

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Jimmy Page is the letter P. ( taken from Guitar player, 26 Legendary Lessons. Play like your heroes. A to Z.)

Jimmy Page

James Patrick Page is one clever bastard.

Think what you will about the third member of the Yardbirds trinity's alleged appropriations of O.P.M. (you figure it out) during his reign with the legendary Led Zeppelin, but the wizardly guitarist - gifted with a keen producer's ear- has always had plenty of tricks of his own. For instance, Page's cultivated a deep relationship with alternate tunings and used them to create lush, otherwise unobtainable musical textures on such epic Zep songs as "Kashmir (DADGAD) and "The Rain Song" (DGCGCD, low to high).

the deceptively simple and easy-to-play combination of simple and complex droning chord voicings that Page concocted for "The Rain Song" are presented without rhythmic reference in Ex. 1 but after listening to the recording you should have little trouble piecing together the puzzle. (Tip; try it on a 12-string.) In another stroke of brilliance, Page was probably the first guy to come up with the smackingly simple solution for playing whammy-style glissandi on a stop-tail Les Paul by hammering-on and pulling off notes while bending ans releasing the string behind the nut with his pick hand. Examples 2 and 3 illustrate this technique, which since has become one of rocks most enduring Spinal Tap moves. - Jesse Gress.

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I really doubt the Helter Skelter part.

Jimmy Page once stated (maybe around the BBC Sessions release?) that the first song he ever heard that he would regard as heavy metal was Helter Skelter, and that Paul McCartney's bass sound on the track was incredible.

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Jimmy Page wasn't the first to violin bow a guitar, there were plenty of other guitarists doing it before him and that's where Jimmy learned it from.

If I may add I read a quote from Jimmy Page where he tells of how he came about the bow and guitar"...David McCallum Sr., father of the Man from U.N.C.L.E. asked Page if he ever tried to bow his guitar as a violin", Page said "I didn't think it would work because the bridge of the guitar isn't arched like the violin or cello. But he insisted I give it a try". Page borrowed his bow to make a few tentative sweeps of his Custom. " What ever squeaks I made sort of intrigued me. I didn't really start developing the technique for quite some time later, but he was the guy who turned me on to the idea"

I have heard and read this story a few times in interviews over the years. Jimmy talked about this in one interview just recently before the London 02 performance. I can't remember what interview it is though. I also read this in the recent bio on Page written by George Case.

Lanni

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i reckon they invented having two front men. two very sexy front men..........

You know you have a very good point there. They shared the stage very nicely, never gave it much thought. I heard the term rock gods was started because of Zeppelin. But someone said it came about because of Clapton.

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I was always under the impression the You Really Got Me by The Kinks (1964) was regarded as the first heavy metal riff.

RB

It's also been said that heavy metal was invented when feedback was first used. It is claimed that The Beatles did this first at the very beginning of "I Feel Fine". Not 100% sure if they were the first and if this is actually the beginning of heavy metal. Probably just a matter of opinion what started it.

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they might be the first and only band to have the title of an album as a title for seperate track on a seperate album.

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How's about the first band without use of a support act?

Or, the first band where the frontmans "unit" stands out like a sore thumb?

(Always good to see older threads I completely forgot about revived)

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How about bowing?

It helps to read a thread before posting. If you had, you would have seen that this question was already settled. David McCallum's father and Eddie Phillips are two examples of people who bowed the guitar before Jimmy.

Carry on.

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