Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
kiss of fire

Robert & Alison to Play benefit in Oklahoma City for Hurricane Ike

Recommended Posts

Thank you for posting this...it's interesting how quiet the benefits for Ike victims have been since it was a big storm that did a lot of damage. I hope there is a big turn out and I hope they set up away for people to donate if they are unable to attend.

Very kind hearted people

"Robert Plant and Alison Krauss will play a special benefit concert at the Zoo Amphitheatre on Friday, Sept. 26, to raise money for the victims of Hurricane Ike,

General admission and reserved-seat tickets will go on sale Monday at Tickets.com or by phone at (800) 511-1552"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was planning to go to the Houston show at one point--hadn't occurred to me that it would obviously have been canceled. That's great that they're doing this show--Robert did so much for the New Orleans Katrina victims too. (Probably Alison did, also, for all I know.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Official Press Release:

_____________________

Plant and Krauss Play Benefit Show For Victims of Hurricane Ike

On Friday, September 26th Robert Plant and Alison Krauss will perform at

the Zoo Amphitheater in Oklahoma City and all net proceeds from the event

will be donated to the victims of Hurricane Ike through the Gulf Coast Ike

Relief Fund. Oklahoma Governor Brad Henry and the city of Oklahoma City have

rallied behind this benefit to offset costs and to provide additional

assistance to the Hurricane Ike victims.

For more information on the Gulf Coast Ike Relief Fund, please click here: www.ghcf.org

The duo were set to make a stop in Houston on their

‘Raising Sand’ tour, but due to the damage done to the Cynthia Woods

Mitchell Pavilion from the hurricane, they were forced to relocate the show

to Oklahoma City when no other venue in the Houston area was available.

The artists would like to issue the following statement:

“When we saw the devastation that Ike had wreaked upon Houston and the Gulf

Coast area, we immediately made the decision to turn our scheduled show in

the area into a benefit for the victims of this disaster. When it was made

clear to us that we wouldn’t be able to bring our show in, we immediately

sought out an alternate city and venue to host the benefit so that badly

needed funds could get into the proper hands as quickly as possible. To this

end, we are grateful to the people of Oklahoma City for stepping up and

contributing to this cause.

To the great people of Houston and the Gulf Coast, please know that you are

in our thoughts as you continue to recover from all you’ve been through.”

Sincerely,

Robert Plant, Alison Krauss and T Bone Burnett

###

Who: Robert Plant and Alison Krauss featuring T Bone Burnett

What: ‘Raising Sand’ Performance

Where: Zoo Amphitheater in Oklahoma City – 2101 NE 50th Street Oklahoma City

When: Friday, September 26th at 7:30 PM; Doors at 6 PM

Ticketing: http://www.zooamp.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:cheer: I'll be there!

Chell - hopefully you'll be able to get some pics as good as your last ones! B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interestingly enough, I have heard a lot of rumors about the future of The Woodlands Pavilion, which is the venue where they were supposed to have played. One rumor I have heard is that they may not even reopen it if a certain developer offers the right price for the land. The site is in the middle of one of the fastest growing and is considered one of the best areas to live, work and play in the Houston region (Yes, I do live in the area, too! haha). The Toyota Center has taken a little of its thunder, but it was ranked as the number one open air venue by Pollstar last year and number two this year. It would be a loss to the community and would force me to drive into the heart of Houston to see the shows I like to see.

On the bright side, A/C for concerts in Houston is a wonderful thing!

Check out this article:

http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=...&id=6414576

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Oklahoma City Zoo hosts Plant, Krauss in Hurricane Ike benefit

By Gene Triplett

Entertainment Editor

Robert Plant and Alison Krauss turn their music-making travels into a mission of mercy tonight at the Zoo Amphitheatre when the hurriedly organized Oklahoma City stop on their "Raising Sand” tour becomes a fundraising event for the victims of Hurricane Ike.

"It'd be great to see some people turn out,” Plant said in a phone interview from St. Louis Wednesday. "I mean we're playing out of our minds. It's a really great show that we're doing and we're all dutybound to be doing something like this. It's the time to do it. So I can only imagine it's going to be a spectacular night.”

******************************************

Plant said he's hoping for a follow-up album with Krauss sometime in the future.

"We keep threatening to try and be sensible together long enough to make another collection of songs, yeah,” he said. "Most importantly, the humor and the charm that we all share is a blessing in this rather incestuous and occasionally acrid career. Musicians aren't always the greatest to be around and this bunch of people are a dream. So, yeah, we talk about it and we are collecting more and more songs and threatening to write stuff together. I think it'll be something that isn't going to go away that easily.”

http://newsok.com/the-oklahoma-city-zoo-ho...article/3302732

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had PIT tickets for the Woodlands show tonight! I am so depressed, effing hurricane! Yet I still have a home, so I shouldn't be one to complain.

God bless Robert and Alison for wanting to do this. Think it's wonderful. The victims of Ike and Gustav are getting lost in the shuffle of bad politics and economics. It's not right.

I sure wish I had a way to get to OK City tonight!!!

Edited by Boogie Child

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had PIT tickets for the Woodlands show tonight! I am so depressed, effing hurricane! Yet I still have a home, so I shouldn't be one to complain.

God bless Robert and Alison for wanting to do this. Think it's wonderful. The victims of Ike and Gustav are getting lost in the shuffle of bad politics and economics. It's not right.

I sure wish I had a way to get to OK City tonight!!!

Sorry you are missing out on the show but more importantly happy to hear you are safe and didn't lose your home! It is a shame that the victims are getting lost in the shuffle but nice to see people like Robert and Alison doing their part to help out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had PIT tickets for the Woodlands show tonight! I am so depressed, effing hurricane! Yet I still have a home, so I shouldn't be one to complain.

God bless Robert and Alison for wanting to do this. Think it's wonderful. The victims of Ike and Gustav are getting lost in the shuffle of bad politics and economics. It's not right.

I sure wish I had a way to get to OK City tonight!!!

Typical beaurocratic b.s. Always have their priorities straight. I guess someone in the area isn't up for re-election otherwise they'd be putting on a show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One of the Houston region’s biggest entertainment venues has been forced to cancel the remainder of its performance schedule due to damage caused by Hurricane Ike.

The Teflon-coated, circus-tent-style roof at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion in The Woodlands suffered extensive damage, and structural engineers have determined that it cannot be used during public performances, Jerry MacDonald, the pavilion’s president and chief executive said Friday.

“Our facility is unsafe in its current condition to hold any type of event due to the damage,” MacDonald said.

The venue was to have hosted a major concert event Friday evening featuring Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. Other big shows that have been cancelled include Brad Paisley on Oct. 17 and the popular Buzzfest alternative rock festival on Oct. 26.

Plant and Krauss will perform Friday night at a hastily arranged concert in Oklahoma City and will donate all proceeds to Hurricane Ike relief efforts.

The pavilion was on track for a record-setting year, having already had 11 sold-out events of more than 15,000 attendees. The previous record of 10 sellouts was in 2004.

Refunds for cancelled events will automatically be credited to the credit cards used for purchase through the TicketMaster Web site or over the phone with that ticket vendor. Tickets purchased at the pavilion box office or in person at TicketMaster outlets can be refunded at the point of purchase.

More information about cancelled and rescheduled events can be found at the venue Web site at www.woodlandscenter.org.

http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/stories...22/daily55.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugs from the Texas coast to Robert and Alison for their beneficence. Your efforts are appreciated.

I have numerous relatives in the area- and my city was a near miss for this disaster. I do agree that poliitics play a huge role in the coverage that Houston is receiving right now. I believe that a news diversion is taking place.

But, we are Texans- we've pulled together to survive since the Alamo-we'll survive (and thrive from) this as well. B)

Edited by Tejanablonde

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been a tough year down south, think i'll be looking for some hills soon that aren't called levees :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hugs from the Texas coast to Robert and Alison for their beneficence. Your efforts are appreciated.

I have numerous relatives in the area- and my city was a near miss for this disaster. I do agree that poliitics play a huge role in the coverage that Houston is receiving right now. I believe that a news diversion is taking place.

But, we are Texans- we've pulled together to survive since the Alamo-we'll survive (and thrive from) this as well. B)

I assure you the only thing we are waiting for FEMA on are checks for reimbursement. No local government other than New Orleans would wait or FEMA to rescue them. We are doing it right in Houston.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For one thing, Katrina was an unprecedented recent disaster, from which all other cities are now learning. Houston--a city I know well, btw, and send all the best to everyone there and hope to visit again soon--wouldn't have the same attitude to FEMA now if we hadn't seen how the Katrina/Rita disasters played out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I assure you the only thing we are waiting for FEMA on are checks for reimbursement. No local government other than New Orleans would wait or FEMA to rescue them. We are doing it right in Houston.

Texas learned something from Galveston's 8,000 death toll in 1900. Houston and Galveston have prepared for hurricanes ever since.

For one thing, Katrina was an unprecedented recent disaster, from which all other cities are now learning. Houston--a city I know well, btw, and send all the best to everyone there and hope to visit again soon--wouldn't have the same attitude to FEMA now if we hadn't seen how the Katrina/Rita disasters played out.

Not true, Texas had its own version of Katrina back in 1900 in Galveston.

Edited by eternal light

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Texas learned something from Galveston's 8,000 death toll in 1900. Houston and Galveston have prepared for hurricanes ever since.

Not true, Texas had its own version of Katrina back in 1900 in Galveston.

I absolutely agree with you EL. We have known how to prepare for a hurricane, except for a select few hard-headed individuals, for over a century.

Hurricane preparedness comes with the territory we live in. No attempt to fight with anyone here, just a fact of life. One of my earliest memories involves hurricane preparation. <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Texas learned something from Galveston's 8,000 death toll in 1900. Houston and Galveston have prepared for hurricanes ever since.

Not true, Texas had its own version of Katrina back in 1900 in Galveston.

i think you'll find aqua mentioning 'recent' in the sentence you responded to. if 108 years is considered 'recent' by you, then "hats off" to eternal light.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For one thing, Katrina was an unprecedented recent disaster, from which all other cities are now learning. Houston--a city I know well, btw, and send all the best to everyone there and hope to visit again soon--wouldn't have the same attitude to FEMA now if we hadn't seen how the Katrina/Rita disasters played out.

Aqua, I will respectfully disagree with you (and still love ya in the process dahlin!). I work in a position where in the event of disaster we follow certain protocols and know how to respond in the worst case scenario. We just did it for Ike, too! We plan and prepare for the worst. FEMA was never even considered to be a first responder prior to Katrina. I grew up in Louisiana and used to spend a few summers in New Orleans (my aunt is a nun). I love New Orleans and hate what happened there. However, as far back as I can remember growing up, it was always talked about that if the right storm hit New Orleans (and we know Katrina didn't directly hit New Orleans) that it was a recipe for disaster. Knowing that, local officials should have had specific plans in place for what to do in that event and should have had the means to do it. In our budget, we have a line item for contingency and emergency supplies. New Orleans did not do their job. I also think the state should have made sure that the biggest economic draw of the entire state had its ducks in a row.

Typically, prior to Katrina/Rita, FEMA was only supposed to be there after the fact to write a check or send in supplies resulting from a direct request from state/local governments dealing with a disaster. That being said I got power back Friday (woohoo!) and am happy Ike's damage didn't hurt my house aside from a few branches here and there and making my pool look like a dirty aquarium. I am thankful now and still remember that my heart was broken when I saw what happened to New Orleans (and the Biloxi area) way back when.

Edited by cabal200

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

from FEMA's website:

link

The Disaster Process and Disaster Aid Programs

Response and Recovery

First Response to a disaster is the job of local government's emergency services with help from nearby municipalities, the state and volunteer agencies. In a catastrophic disaster, and if the governor requests, federal resources can be mobilized through theU.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for search and rescue, electrical power, food, water, shelter and other basic human needs.

It is the long-term Recovery phase of disaster which places the most severe financial strain on a local or state government. Damage to public facilities and infrastructure, often not insured, can overwhelm even a large city.

A governor's request for a major disaster declaration could mean an infusion of federal funds, but the governor must also commit significant state funds and resources for recovery efforts.

A Major Disaster could result from a hurricane, earthquake, flood, tornado or major fire which the President determines warrants supplemental federal aid. The event must be clearly more than state or local governments can handle alone. If declared, funding comes from the President's Disaster Relief Fund, which is managed by FEMA, and disaster aid programs of other participating federal agencies.

A Presidential Major Disaster Declaration puts into motion long-term federal recovery programs, some of which are matched by state programs, and designed to help disaster victims, businesses and public entities.

An Emergency Declaration is more limited in scope and without the long-term federal recovery programs of a Major Disaster Declaration. Generally, federal assistance and funding are provided to meet a specific emergency need or to help prevent a major disaster from occurring.

The Major Disaster Process

A Major Disaster Declaration usually follows these steps:

Local Government Responds, supplemented by neighboring communities and volunteer agencies. If overwhelmed, turn to the state for assistance;

The State Responds with state resources, such as the National Guard and state agencies;

Damage Assessment by local, state, federal, and volunteer organizations determines losses and recovery needs;

A Major Disaster Declaration is requested by the governor, based on the damage assessment, and an agreement to commit state funds and resources to the long-term recovery;

FEMA Evaluates the request and recommends action to the White House based on the disaster, the local community and the state's ability to recover;

The President approves the request or FEMA informs the governor it has been denied. This decision process could take a few hours or several weeks depending on the nature of the disaster.

Learn more about the disaster declaration process

Disaster Aid Programs

There are three major categories of disaster aid:

Individual Assistance

Immediately after the declaration, disaster workers arrive and set up a central field office to coordinate the recovery effort. A toll-free telephone number is published for use by affected residents and business owners in registering for assistance. Disaster Recovery Centers also are opened where disaster victims can meet with program representatives and obtain information about available aid and the recovery process.

Disaster aid to individuals generally falls into the following categories:

Disaster Housing may be available for up to 18 months, using local resources, for displaced persons whose residences were heavily damaged or destroyed. Funding also can be provided for housing repairs and replacement of damaged items to make homes habitable.

Disaster Grants, are available to help meet other serious disaster related needs and necessary expenses not covered by insurance and other aid programs. These may include replacement of personal property, and transportation, medical, dental and funeral expenses.

Low-Interest Disaster Loans are available after a disaster for homeowners and renters from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) to cover uninsured property losses. Loans may be for repair or replacement of homes, automobiles, clothing or other damaged personal property. Loans are also available to businesses for property loss and economic injury.

Other Disaster Aid Programs include crisis counseling, disaster-related unemployment assistance, legal aid and assistance with income tax, Social Security and Veteran's benefits. Other state or local help may also be available.

Assistance Process -- After the application is taken, the damaged property is inspected to verify the loss. If approved, an applicant will soon receive a check for rental assistance or a grant. Loan applications require more information and approval may take several weeks after application. The deadline for most individual assistance programs is 60 days following the President's major disaster declaration.

Audits are done later to ensure that aid went to only those who were eligible and that disaster aid funds were used only for their intended purposes. These federal program funds cannot duplicate assistance provided by other sources such as insurance.

After a major disaster, FEMA tries to notify all disaster victims about the available aid programs and urge them to apply. The news media are encouraged to visit a Disaster Recovery Center, meet with disaster officials, and help publicize the disaster aid programs and the toll-free teleregistration number.

Apply for Individual Assistance

Public Assistance

Public Assistance is aid to state or local governments to pay part of the costs of rebuilding a community's damaged infrastructure. Generally, public assistance programs pay for 75 per cent of the approved project costs. Public Assistance may include debris removal, emergency protective measures and public services, repair of damaged public property, loans needed by communities for essential government functions and grants for public schools.

Hazard Mitigation

Disaster victims and public entities are encouraged to avoid the life and property risks of future disasters. Examples include the elevation or relocation of chronically flood-damaged homes away from flood hazard areas, retrofitting buildings to make them resistant to earthquakes or strong winds, and adoption and enforcement of adequate codes and standards by local, state and federal government. FEMA helps fund damage mitigation measures when repairing disaster-damaged structures and through the Hazard Mitigation.

Last Modified: Wednesday, 13-Sep-2006 14:19:25 EDT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...