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Favorite version of Listen to this Eddie


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What is "listen to this Eddie", and who is Eddie? I'm pretty sure Plant says it during the Soundstage DVD w/Strange Sensation-I'd have to watch it again to see exactly when-I always wondered why & for whom.

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"Listen To This, Eddie", or LTTE for short, is the title given to the tape(and subsequent vinyl and cd releases) of the Led Zeppelin concert June 21, 1977 at the Los Angeles Forum recorded by the legendary taper Mike Millard(google him or see the tapers section at the Underground Uprising website). The concert was the first of 6 performed at the Forum that week...and I believe Millard taped at least 4 of the shows: June 21, 23, 25 and 27.

Millard's tapes are legend because of the sound quality he achieved by using high quality equipment, a Nakamichi tape deck and AKG microphones, that he hid by using a wheelchair to mount his mic's and to gain access to prime seating locations.

His tapes are far superior to the usual audience tapes and frequently better(especially in the case of "atmosphere") than many soundboards. Too many soundboards give the impression the concert was held in a vacuum.

You can hear a sample of the "Listen to this, Eddie" tape on the Led Zeppelin "DVD" that came out in 2003...go to the video menu section and you will hear the audio of the 6/21/77 "The Song Remains the Same" synched to video from the '77 Birmingham and Madison Square Garden shows.

Anyway, the tape has accrued the status of "must-have" over the years not just for the quality of its sound, but also for it being one of the few really great performances from the 1977 tour available.

When Mike Millard sent out a copy of the tape to one of his trading buddies, he wrote on the cassette cover the phrase, "Listen to this Eddie". As this copy eventually found its way into bootleggers hands, the phrase became the most common phrase used to title this show.

Now, as to who "Eddie" is...over the years many tales have sprung up...that Eddie referred to Eddie Van Halen(because of comments Eddie made referring to how Jimmy couldn't play his solos anymore) or Eddie Kramer(because Kramer refused to multi-track record the 1977 tour because he was upset at the band's drug use) or it was just a guy named "Eddie" that Millard traded with.

After careful consideration of the timeline and other facts, I have long come to the conclusion that the Eddie Van Halen theory is bogus...the comments Eddie made slagging Jimmy's playing were published long after the tape had made the rounds and the title "Listen to this Eddie" was in the public consciousness. So it can't be Eddie Van Halen.

Eddie Kramer also doesn't fit, because again, it wasn't known that Kramer turned down the offer to record the 77 tour until after the "Listen to this, Eddie" bootlegs appeared.

Unless Mike Millard was incredibly well-connected to someone in Led Zeppelin's inner-circle, I just don't see how Mike would have known about the Eddie Kramer situation.

That leaves the last, and most rational and plausible theory...that "Eddie" refers to just some random Eddie that Mike traded tapes with...and through the high demand and collectability of the show, "Eddie" achieved mythical status.

Since the Eddie Van Halen and Eddie Kramer stories made for "good copy", more people were predisposed to believe them...like the old John Ford movie "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" says, when legend becomes fact, print the legend.

Since both Jimmy and Robert have been known to collect a few Zep bootlegs, I am sure they have come across the "Listen to this, Eddie" many many times...and also know the legendary status the show has in the concert-trading and Zeppelin-fan worlds.

Which is why Plant has name-checked it at many concerts over the years, in particular the "Mighty Rearranger" tour.

For any more info, you'll have to go to SteveAJones...I bow to him when it comes to Zeppelin knowledge.

Whoever "Eddie" refers to...that is not important...what is important is that you get a copy of this show; it is easily on the Top 20, if not Top 10 list of Zeppelin shows to have in your collection.

Oh...and I was there at that concert. As were some others here on this board, I believe.

Edited by Strider
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  • 3 weeks later...

I've always had the Scorpio version, but thanks to tom kid, i got the Winston version and it is wonderful, been listening to it alot recently and Achilles, SIBLY, TSRTS amongst others are bloody brilliant :D

Then, since you're looking for the 'best' versions for the June 25th and 27th shows, John, you might as well go with Andy Winston's versions of those shows as well. Though I admit I personally haven't heard Andy's versions of those particular nights, if they are of the same caliber as his work on the 21st, then they are probably the 'definitive' versions.

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Then,since you're looking for the 'best' versions for the June 25th and 27thshows, John, you might as well go with Andy Winston's versions of thoseshows as well. Though I admit I personally haven't heard Andy'sversions of those particular nights, if they are of the same caliber ashis work on the 21st, then they are probably the 'definitive' versions.

I have both, and both are excellent (particularly the 27th).

Winston needs to remaster all 6 shows!

Not likely to happen.

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I have both, and both are excellent (particularly the 27th).

Has he done these shows too? Need to get my hands on these. I have "Sgt. Page's Badgeholders Club Band" and "Deep Striker" which still sound brilliant mind you.

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"Listen To This, Eddie", or LTTE for short, is the title given to the tape(and subsequent vinyl and cd releases) of the Led Zeppelin concert June 21, 1977 at the Los Angeles Forum recorded by the legendary taper Mike Millard(google him or see the tapers section at the Underground Uprising website). The concert was the first of 6 performed at the Forum that week...and I believe Millard taped at least 4 of the shows: June 21, 23, 25 and 27.

Millard's tapes are legend because of the sound quality he achieved by using high quality equipment, a Nakamichi tape deck and AKG microphones, that he hid by using a wheelchair to mount his mic's and to gain access to prime seating locations.

His tapes are far superior to the usual audience tapes and frequently better(especially in the case of "atmosphere") than many soundboards. Too many soundboards give the impression the concert was held in a vacuum.

You can hear a sample of the "Listen to this, Eddie" tape on the Led Zeppelin "DVD" that came out in 2003...go to the video menu section and you will hear the audio of the 6/21/77 "The Song Remains the Same" synched to video from the '77 Birmingham and Madison Square Garden shows.

Anyway, the tape has accrued the status of "must-have" over the years not just for the quality of its sound, but also for it being one of the few really great performances from the 1977 tour available.

When Mike Millard sent out a copy of the tape to one of his trading buddies, he wrote on the cassette cover the phrase, "Listen to this Eddie". As this copy eventually found its way into bootleggers hands, the phrase became the most common phrase used to title this show.

Now, as to who "Eddie" is...over the years many tales have sprung up...that Eddie referred to Eddie Van Halen(because of comments Eddie made referring to how Jimmy couldn't play his solos anymore) or Eddie Kramer(because Kramer refused to multi-track record the 1977 tour because he was upset at the band's drug use) or it was just a guy named "Eddie" that Millard traded with.

After careful consideration of the timeline and other facts, I have long come to the conclusion that the Eddie Van Halen theory is bogus...the comments Eddie made slagging Jimmy's playing were published long after the tape had made the rounds and the title "Listen to this Eddie" was in the public consciousness. So it can't be Eddie Van Halen.

Eddie Kramer also doesn't fit, because again, it wasn't known that Kramer turned down the offer to record the 77 tour until after the "Listen to this, Eddie" bootlegs appeared.

Unless Mike Millard was incredibly well-connected to someone in Led Zeppelin's inner-circle, I just don't see how Mike would have known about the Eddie Kramer situation.

That leaves the last, and most rational and plausible theory...that "Eddie" refers to just some random Eddie that Mike traded tapes with...and through the high demand and collectability of the show, "Eddie" achieved mythical status.

Since the Eddie Van Halen and Eddie Kramer stories made for "good copy", more people were predisposed to believe them...like the old John Ford movie "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" says, when legend becomes fact, print the legend.

Since both Jimmy and Robert have been known to collect a few Zep bootlegs, I am sure they have come across the "Listen to this, Eddie" many many times...and also know the legendary status the show has in the concert-trading and Zeppelin-fan worlds.

Which is why Plant has name-checked it at many concerts over the years, in particular the "Mighty Rearranger" tour.

For any more info, you'll have to go to SteveAJones...I bow to him when it comes to Zeppelin knowledge.

Whoever "Eddie" refers to...that is not important...what is important is that you get a copy of this show; it is easily on the Top 20, if not Top 10 list of Zeppelin shows to have in your collection.

Oh...and I was there at that concert. As were some others here on this board, I believe.

Thanks for taking the time to post all that info! Now I know what he was referring to!

And I have the Zep DVD so I'll check the track you mentioned.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I was just curious as to what people thought of the different versions of this show be it evsd or the new zep remaster or the original sira

I used to really like the GM version but the new zep master sounds brighter and i think overall has the best sound

Eddie Vedder? No F'n way!!!

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When Mike Millard sent out a copy of the tape to one of his trading buddies, he wrote on the cassette cover the phrase, "Listen to this Eddie". As this copy eventually found its way into bootleggers hands, the phrase became the most common phrase used to title this show.

I'd never heard that. I'm open to the possibility, but do you have a reference on that?

As far as I know, the phrase "Listen to this Eddie" was coined by the original Rock Solid bootleggers when they issued the title on vinyl. Bootleggers named their releases all sorts of crazy things back in the day, with many of them being very cryptic. The origin of the Eddie name has always been up for debate, but I really can't imagine Mike Millard having had anything to do with it.

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It refers to Mr.Van Halen if anyone was wondering.

Well, that has been part of the long-held debate. That the title is in reference to either Eddie Van Halen or Eddie Kramer has always been the question.

But, I have yet to see anything anywhere that conclusively proves who exactly Eddie was, because it could just as easily have been in reference to something/someone else entirely. Only the bootleggers who came up with the title could set the record straight. Everything else seems to just be opinions.

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It refers to Mr.Van Halen if anyone was wondering.

Pay attention:

"After careful consideration of the timeline and other facts, I have long come to the conclusion that the Eddie Van Halen theory is bogus...the comments Eddie made slagging Jimmy's playing were published long after the tape had made the rounds and the title "Listen to this Eddie" was in the public consciousness.

So it can't be Eddie Van Halen.

Eddie Kramer also doesn't fit, because again, it wasn't known that Kramer turned down the offer to record the 77 tour until after the "Listen to this, Eddie" bootlegs appeared.

Unless Mike Millard was incredibly well-connected to someone in Led Zeppelin's inner-circle, I just don't see how Mike would have known about the Eddie Kramer situation.

That leaves the last, and most rational and plausible theory...that "Eddie" refers to just some random Eddie that Mike traded tapes with...and through the high demand and collectability of the show, "Eddie" achieved mythical status."

Edited by snapper
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Pay attention:

"After careful consideration of the timeline and other facts, I have long come to the conclusion that the Eddie Van Halen theory is bogus...the comments Eddie made slagging Jimmy's playing were published long after the tape had made the rounds and the title "Listen to this Eddie" was in the public consciousness.

So it can't be Eddie Van Halen.

Eddie Kramer also doesn't fit, because again, it wasn't known that Kramer turned down the offer to record the 77 tour until after the "Listen to this, Eddie" bootlegs appeared.

Unless Mike Millard was incredibly well-connected to someone in Led Zeppelin's inner-circle, I just don't see how Mike would have known about the Eddie Kramer situation.

That leaves the last, and most rational and plausible theory...that "Eddie" refers to just some random Eddie that Mike traded tapes with...and through the high demand and collectability of the show, "Eddie" achieved mythical status."

Nope. It's actually the other way around. Van Halen's first negative comments about Page's playing appeared in 1981, in the January issue of Guitar World. The label that created the "Listen to this Eddie" bootleg, Rock Solid Records, didn't exist until 1985, 4 years after Van Halen's comments. Millard's tape did not appear anywhere except among his friends and fellow tapers until that bootleg came out. He never sold his tapes to the bootleggers, and this was pre-internet. So, it's not as if there were plenty of these copies floating around. And when Mike did send out copies of his shows, he addressed them "Mike the Mike", and put photocopies of his ticket stubs. Unless the person who made the comment that Millard put "Listen to this Eddie" on a tape that he sent to a friend has any proof to back up where he heard that, I'd say that he's making it up. Furthermore, just looking at the examples of other titles on bootlegs, the names are almost always in reference to the actual show itself. So for the bootleggers to have made up the title using a note from the copy of tape they supposedly received would make no sense at all, even for them.

End of story, no one REALLY knows what the title refers to. Only the bootleggers do. But pretty much every single shread of evidence points to it being in reference to Van Halen. For it to refer to Kramer is nonsense, since the theories about Kramer having supposedly declined to record the tour is a complete myth. Besides, Kramer was nowhere to be found in the 80's. Whereas Van Halen was everywhere. So any number of fans could've easily picked up on the connection between Van Halen's comments about Page and the bootleg title.

Edited by cookieshoes
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End of story, no one REALLY knows what the title refers to. Only the bootleggers do. But pretty much every single shread of evidence points to it being in reference to Van Halen.

I haven't seen one shread of this evidence yet, if you have, please share.

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I haven't seen one shread of this evidence yet, if you have, please share.

Read my post again. There is no concrete/definitive proof. All that remains are the shreds of evidence that I listed in my post above. Of which, there is absolutely nothing that even remotely connects Eddie Kramer or a supposed note from Mike Millard to the title. Yet there are several things that connect it to Van Halen: The time period during which the boot was made (mid-80's when Van Halen was at the height of their popularity), Van Halen's infamous quotes bashing Page's playing ability live (the Guitar World article from 1981), and the fact that experts such as Dave Lewis have also stated that the title is likely in reference to Van Halen (and if anyone would know, they would). Bootleggers use made-up titles all the time, but they always have some "sense" to them. "Ooh My Ears Man", "For Badgeholders Only", "Bonzo's Birthday Party", etc. Either something connected to the show, or something about the significance of the show. To think that the title "Listen to this Eddie" was the bootleggers way of giving some sort of shout-out to Eddie Kramer to see how good the sound of the boot is makes no sense at all. Whereas the title being a response to Van Halen's negative opinion of Page's live abilities does.

Again, it's all ultimately guessing. But the educated guess is for Van Halen.

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i just wanted say how cool it is to see how this thread evolved.

I like the one theory about how Mike Millard told his friend eddie to listen to this. Maybe Mike made a copy for his friend that simply said "Listen To This Eddie" and the name just sorta stuck. I have no idea if it is true but I like the simplicity of it.

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Well, simple or not, the Millard story is absolute nonsense. It's making something up for the sake of making it up.

Millard was 100% against bootlegging. So, to think that he would've sent a copy of his tape to a bootlegger is impossible. It's more likely that the source for the Eddie boot was a complete stranger to Mike anyway, and had received the tape in a trade from who knows who far down the line that Millard had traded with. So, any theory about somebody having written a note that read "Hey, listen to this" to their mythical friend "Eddie" becomes further meaningless. Because why on earth would a boot company have cared to make such a point of it? Bootleggers got tapes from all sorts of people, which they usually paid for. And half of the recipe for making a bootleg was that it was done in secret. So, putting someone's actual name on these things obviously never happened.

The people who made these things back in the day were clever crafty individuals. So, when it came to the titles on these things, they were always done in the same vein of humor. "Live on Blueberry Hill", "Dinosaurs in Motion", "Duck Walks and Lasers", "Zoso's Back to Rock and Roll"....all the same type of clever. So to think that the title "Listen to this Eddie" is an actual reference to someone the bootleggers knew named Eddie is completely missing the humor. The title is in reference to something that the average bootleg customer can "figure out" if they are hip to the lingo. Which is why Eddie Van Halen has always come up as the most likely possibilty. Because for the time period and for the circumstances, that is the one that makes the most sense.

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Well, simple or not, the Millard story is absolute nonsense. It's making something up for the sake of making it up.

Millard was 100% against bootlegging. So, to think that he would've sent a copy of his tape to a bootlegger is impossible. It's more likely that the source for the Eddie boot was a complete stranger to Mike anyway, and had received the tape in a trade from who knows who far down the line that Millard had traded with. So, any theory about somebody having written a note that read "Hey, listen to this" to their mythical friend "Eddie" becomes further meaningless. Because why on earth would a boot company have cared to make such a point of it? Bootleggers got tapes from all sorts of people, which they usually paid for. And half of the recipe for making a bootleg was that it was done in secret. So, putting someone's actual name on these things obviously never happened.

The people who made these things back in the day were clever crafty individuals. So, when it came to the titles on these things, they were always done in the same vein of humor. "Live on Blueberry Hill", "Dinosaurs in Motion", "Duck Walks and Lasers", "Zoso's Back to Rock and Roll"....all the same type of clever. So to think that the title "Listen to this Eddie" is an actual reference to someone the bootleggers knew named Eddie is completely missing the humor. The title is in reference to something that the average bootleg customer can "figure out" if they are hip to the lingo. Which is why Eddie Van Halen has always come up as the most likely possibilty. Because for the time period and for the circumstances, that is the one that makes the most sense.

I still disagree. LTTE is considered to be one of the best audience recording ever of Zeppelin,hence, its importance.

Yes, it was also a great performance by the band (most notably Bohham) but Page has had many better nights (not on the 77' tour, granted). I just don't see why Page's playing at this this concert would be used as a rebuke to anything EVH said about Page, its good (for 77'), but I've heard alot better.

I think Page's playing on 6/23/77 (for example) is more impressive than 6/21/77.

I'm still going with the "theory" that Millard sent the tape to a trading buddy (not a bootlegger) who's name was Eddie (a very common name). Millard, being impressed with the quality of his recording in a boasting/competetive manner wrote "Listen to This Eddie" on the tape and the title just stuck. Its really not that far fetched, and to me, makes the most sense.

Edited by snapper
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