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Chicken

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Yesterday, I got cracking on "Sarum" an epic novel about England, specifically Salisbury and the surrounding area, spanning in time from the end of the Paleolithic era to World War II. I've gotten up to the Neolithic period, which is of a particular fascination to me, as this is the culture who built Stonehenge and all the other remarkable earthworks in the area.

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Yesterday, I got cracking on "Sarum" an epic novel about England, specifically Salisbury and the surrounding area, spanning in time from the end of the Paleolithic era to World War II. I've gotten up to the Neolithic period, which is of a particular fascination to me, as this is the culture who built Stonehenge and all the other remarkable earthworks in the area.

Sounds like an interesting read!

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John Lennon: the Life. So far so good, its well written.

I'm on page 352. John is a very...errrr, complex bloke.

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A Side Note:

The US Postal Service is issuing an Edgar Allan Poe Stamp this Jan. 16th.

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In 2009, the U.S. Postal Service commemorates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Edgar Allan Poe, one of America’s most extraordinary poets and fiction writers. For more than a century and a half, Poe and his works have been praised by admirers around the world, including English poet laureate Alfred, Lord Tennyson, who dubbed Poe “the literary glory of America.” British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle called him “the supreme original short story writer of all time.”

The stamp portrait of Edgar Allan Poe is by award-winning artist Michael J. Deas, whose research over the years has made him well acquainted with Poe’s appearance. In 1989, Deas published The Portraits and Daguerreotypes of Edgar Allan Poe, a comprehensive collection of images featuring authentic likenesses as well as derivative portraits.

Scheduled issue date: Jan. 16 in Richmond, VA.

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Yesterday, I got cracking on "Sarum" an epic novel about England, specifically Salisbury and the surrounding area, spanning in time from the end of the Paleolithic era to World War II. I've gotten up to the Neolithic period, which is of a particular fascination to me, as this is the culture who built Stonehenge and all the other remarkable earthworks in the area.

I read this years ago when it was first published. I really loved this book and I'm inspired to dig through my collection to find it. I thought it was well-researched but also very good fiction. I like how the author didn't let the history bog down the story. The part about the viking invaders gave me shivers.

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Once again dude. The 70's rule. Led Zeppelin rules. All that new shit is garbage.

I'm not sure what a book devoted to 1,000 recordings one person recommends hearing before you die has do with your statement. The book includes jazz, rock, folk, blues, reggae, world music, opera, classical, bluegrass, R & B, soul, etc. It's not just devoted to one type of music or a specific time period. Maybe you're thinking of another book.

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Led Zeppelin: Dazed and confused. [story behind every song]

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I'm reading Bandits by Elmore Leonard, which is one of my favorite writers.

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I read this years ago when it was first published. I really loved this book and I'm inspired to dig through my collection to find it. I thought it was well-researched but also very good fiction. I like how the author didn't let the history bog down the story. The part about the viking invaders gave me shivers.

That's cool how so many folks here have positive things to say about the book. I'm enjoying it; I'm now at the arrival of the Romans. My only quibble so far is that the author's perspective is very male - women are just property basically, valued only for their ability to beget children. One could argue that this perspective *is* historically correct, however unfortunate. But I don't know: in a land so underpopulated, one would think they'd need "all hands onboard" in terms of contributing labor. And Celtic society was egalitarian, in terms of women owning property, having the right to divorce, and even participating in battle.

But I digress. Rover, thanks for the heads up on the Edgar Allen Poe stamps: I'm definitely going to get those.

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I just started Danny Goldberg's autobiography "Bumping Into Geniuses". I figure there's gotta be some good Zeppelin stories in there.

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I just started Danny Goldberg's autobiography "Bumping Into Geniuses". I figure there's gotta be some good Zeppelin stories in there.

I was curious about this book and read the chapter pertaining to Zeppelin at the Barnes and Noble. It saved me a good bit of change. The information wasn't new at all and it seems to indict Goldberg as one of the main squealers that formed the basis of the Hammer of the Gods release. The only new revelation is he admits to having the photo shot of Page slumped out and smacked out at the Detective photo session. Now there's a guy you can trust.

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I just started Danny Goldberg's autobiography "Bumping Into Geniuses". I figure there's gotta be some good Zeppelin stories in there.

I wouldn't recommend this just on the strength of the Zeppelin stories alone (though there are plenty) but for all of the rock n' roll stories within. After reading it I figured it would be easier to name the artists Bill Graham didn't work with than the ones he did.

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I wouldn't recommend this just on the strength of the Zeppelin stories alone (though there are plenty) but for all of the rock n' roll stories within. After reading it I figured it would be easier to name the artists Bill Graham didn't work with than the ones he did.

After finishing the book, it was definitely the non-Zeppelin stories I found most interesting, since those were the ones that were new to me. In particular Stevie Nicks. I've never sat down and actually listened to her songs, but after reading the chapter on her, I think I should start!

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I just picked up the 2003 edition of the Toby Press paperback "A Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens. It was typeset in Garamond by Jerusalem Typesetting, and it was printed and bound in the US by Thompson-Shore, Inc., of Michigan. [i also picked up the Bill Graham auto-biography, mentioned juat a couple of posts ago....For all of the Rock stories, including Zeppelin, among, many, many others...]

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Edited by The Rover

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Just started "Twilight" last night

I'm looking forward to reading this, as well. I picked it up last month, but haven't gotten to it yet...Too many books to read...

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I'm looking forward to reading this, as well. I picked it up last month, but haven't gotten to it yet...Too many books to read...

I haven't really gotten going yet; I've only read a few pages. I'll give it a little longer; everyone seems to love it!

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My copy of Mick Wall's book "When Giants Walked the Earth" arrived today after one month on order from Amazon.

After some speed reading there is not alot of new info in here. But I was touched by the hurt Jimmy felt at Robert's refusal to sing "Stairway" at the Atlantic Anniversary show.

Edited by BUCK'EYE' DOC

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good book...how do you like it so far?

The character nuances are really great.. just little touches Toole put in, giving each character their own personality.. I notice things like that. So far it's good.. I'm about halfway done.. I expect to finish it by the end of the week. Did you like it when you read it? :)

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