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What Are You Reading?

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Yesterday would have been the inestimably talented James Joyce's birthday ("Portrait..." brilliant) and today marks the death of Johannes Gutenberg in 1468 (pioneer of printing with movable type which revolutionized dissemination of info, spread of literacy and democracy).

This arrived today :thumbsup:

Vol 19 No 4

Vol 19 No 4 
Winter 2015/2016 
Guest Designer: Barry McGee 

http://www.all-story.com/issues.cgi

Latest accolade:

Quote

All-Story Wins the 2016 NMA!
Zoetrope: All-Story has won the 2016 National Magazine Award for fiction, the highest honor due an American periodical, for Anthony Marra's story "The Grozny Tourist Bureau." We congratulate Anthony and all of our contributors on another year of unparalleled stories.

http://www.all-story.com/

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41NCg-nRIcL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I am currently reading Anthem by Ayn Rand, not because I am a Rush fan, but because my curiosity, got the better of me. This interesting piece of literature, has got me reflecting on my upbringing, especially when I just began my journey into the wonderful world of schooling. 

Alas, during the days of my childhood, when I actually began developing the potential to understand things and question the world around me, I was literally trapped in an institute that was the quintessential dictatorial educational institution. This period in my life, continued for 10 years (from the age 4 to the age 14). The teachers and principal laid down the law. Kids (irrespective of their ages) were deemed too young to think and ask questions. Kids were even questioned in a scornful fashion and ridiculed, when they expressed their likes and dislikes for specific subjects. All in all, the teachers at my school, wished to be looked upon as nothing short of superior beings, who demanded respect! As a human being, how on earth am I supposed to respect someone, when I can't even have an open and honest dialogue with them and ask pertinent questions? 

Everything from math problems, simple word puzzles to the interpretation of complex poetry, was essentially governed by two things that are (in my opinion) detrimental to the universally important notions of critical thinking and creativity: Learning by rote and the existence of the coveted right answer and right approach, coupled with the inability to understand that everybody thinks differently and that all students may not approach a specific problem, in a similar way! I was even beaten with a cane when I was just 9 years old, for committing the ultimate crime of improvising and expressing my own thoughts in writing, on a specific historical event and thereby, failing to by heart passages from a history text book that was deemed appropriate, to answer that specific essay question. At the age of 14, an entire section of an examination answer booklet that consisted of an essay that I had written, had been ripped to shreds in front of me, by my teacher, just because I resented learning by rote and the fact that I couldn't think like the 'good' students! 

My mother being an early childhood educator, firmly believes that, every individual has a right to think, a right to ask questions and have opinions, no matter how young / inexperienced they may seem. She even refers to children of all ages as 'the little citizens of the world, who will one day have the power to make a difference, provided educational institutions mold and shape them in the right way, by encouraging learning and not behaviorism!'. 

Upon reading the first chapter of Anthem, all these thoughts and past experiences came flooding back, but luckily for me personally, there was a light at the end of the tunnel, upon enrolling at University. Honestly, I find myself agreeing with every single little thing that Rand is trying to point out in this work, so far. It is for this reason, that I so far, find her view points in this particular piece, to be music to my ears. 

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16 hours ago, Kiwi_Zep_Fan87 said:

 

41NCg-nRIcL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I am currently reading Anthem by Ayn Rand, not because I am a Rush fan, but because my curiosity, got the better of me. This interesting piece of literature, has got me reflecting on my upbringing, especially when I just began my journey into the wonderful world of schooling. 

Alas, during the days of my childhood, when I actually began developing the potential to understand things and question the world around me, I was literally trapped in an institute that was the quintessential dictatorial educational institution. This period in my life, continued for 10 years (from the age 4 to the age 14). The teachers and principal laid down the law. Kids (irrespective of their ages) were deemed too young to think and ask questions. Kids were even questioned in a scornful fashion and ridiculed, when they expressed their likes and dislikes for specific subjects. All in all, the teachers at my school, wished to be looked upon as nothing short of superior beings, who demanded respect! As a human being, how on earth am I supposed to respect someone, when I can't even have an open and honest dialogue with them and ask pertinent questions? 

Everything from math problems, simple word puzzles to the interpretation of complex poetry, was essentially governed by two things that are (in my opinion) detrimental to the universally important notions of critical thinking and creativity: Learning by rote and the existence of the coveted right answer and right approach, coupled with the inability to understand that everybody thinks differently and that all students may not approach a specific problem, in a similar way! I was even beaten with a cane when I was just 9 years old, for committing the ultimate crime of improvising and expressing my own thoughts in writing, on a specific historical event and thereby, failing to by heart passages from a history text book that was deemed appropriate, to answer that specific essay question. At the age of 14, an entire section of an examination answer booklet that consisted of an essay that I had written, had been ripped to shreds in front of me, by my teacher, just because I resented learning by rote and the fact that I couldn't think like the 'good' students! 

My mother being an early childhood educator, firmly believes that, every individual has a right to think, a right to ask questions and have opinions, no matter how young / inexperienced they may seem. She even refers to children of all ages as 'the little citizens of the world, who will one day have the power to make a difference, provided educational institutions mold and shape them in the right way, by encouraging learning and not behaviorism!'. 

Upon reading the first chapter of Anthem, all these thoughts and past experiences came flooding back, but luckily for me personally, there was a light at the end of the tunnel, upon enrolling at University. Honestly, I find myself agreeing with every single little thing that Rand is trying to point out in this work, so far. It is for this reason, that I so far, find her view points in this particular piece, to be music to my ears. 

Welcome to my world, my views of school match those of yours. I know a thing or 2 about Rand's books and rather enjoy them

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Rock Chronicles Second Edition - I'm on the road for next 7 weeks, leaving either today or tomorrow morning, and plan on reading it and a few other music books each night while in hotel rooms

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2 hours ago, Charles J. White said:

Welcome to my world, my views of school match those of yours. I know a thing or 2 about Rand's books and rather enjoy them

That's so nice to hear, Charles! :D A few people who I know, reacted rather adversely when I picked up Anthem, giving me a series of lectures - how could you read that stuff, etc? :lol: What drew me to this short novel, is the fact that I can identify with Equality 7-2521, in terms of my experiences in school and I really appreciate his bravery to have a vision and way of thinking, way beyond what the esteemed Council prescribes! My dad is a fan of Ayn Rand's work and I came across her novels, in his collection and there was no turning back! I can't wait to dig into We The Living, next! :) 

Edited by Kiwi_Zep_Fan87

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5 hours ago, Kiwi_Zep_Fan87 said:

That's so nice to hear, Charles! :D A few people who I know, reacted rather adversely when I picked up Anthem, giving me a series of lectures - how could you read that stuff, etc? :lol: What drew me to this short novel, is the fact that I can identify with Equality 7-2521, in terms of my experiences in school and I really appreciate his bravery to have a vision and way of thinking, way beyond what the esteemed Council prescribes! My dad is a fan of Ayn Rand's work and I came across her novels, in his collection and there was no turning back! I can't wait to dig into We The Living, next! :) 

After that, consider Atlas Shrugged - it will blow your mind away

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22 hours ago, Charles J. White said:

After that, consider Atlas Shrugged - it will blow your mind away

Sounds interesting! Thanks for the recommendation! I most certainly will! :D 

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Donald Trump's "How to Win Friends and Influence People by Groping Them".

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6 minutes ago, Strider said:

Donald Trump's "How to Win Friends and Influence People by Groping Them".

It's huge, from what people are telling me...

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Not a book. But a magazine. The one that Arsenal do every Month. I get it all the time. Even though i support Everton.

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'Tarawa: The Story Of A Battle' by Robert Sherrod

The 100 Best True Stories Of World War Two

I Used To Be An Animal, but I'm Alright Now by Eric Burdon

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21 hours ago, Kiwi_Zep_Fan87 said:

Thank you so very much, Strider! :kiss:

IMG_1451_zpsdu45xqun.jpg

 

You are very welcome. Sorry it took so long.

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Now that we are going through the 50th anniversary of The Sixties, every year seems to bring a new book asserting that X-year was the pivotal year in music. There have been books about the greatness of 1966, 1967, 1969...and now two more have reached my shelves: one on 1965 and the other focusing on 1971.

20161206_193015.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Strider said:

Now that we are going through the 50th anniversary of The Sixties, every year seems to bring a new book asserting that X-year was the pivotal year in music. There have been books about the greatness of 1966, 1967, 1969...and now two more have reached my shelves: one on 1965 and the other focusing on 1971.

20161206_193015.jpg

How time flies.

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