Jump to content

What The Famous Say About Led Zeppelin


Recommended Posts

Christies.jpg

Simeon Lipman, head of pop culture at Christie's, has remarked about Led Zeppelin's cultural impact:

"Led Zeppelin have had a big influence on fashion because the whole aura surrounding them is so cool, and people want a piece of that. There's no question that this T-shirt had been worn, but that's what makes them desirable. The blood, sweat and tears of the concert are embedded in the fabric."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 433
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Haven't heard about that. Could you provide any quotes? I really doubt Keith could ever confuse Roger with Robert

Hi 'Amusedoxi'

I think Keith could be confused over almost anything, like with Ronny Wood, the Drugs and Alcohol have played their part and have given them both a short cut to senility.

Regards, Danny

PS, "Robert Who? no that's Roger init? :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob Halford & KK Downing of Judas Priest in Guitar World September 2008:

GW: Rob just mentioned hearing a bootleg of the recent Led Zeppelin show. Judas Priest once opened for Zeppelin, correct?

Downing: We did - for two shows, in '77. It was our very first tour of America.

Halford: We had just finished our own tour when we got word from Robert Plant, who knew we were in the States. He basically said "I know you guys are done, but Zeppelin are doing two Bill Graham Day on the Green events in Oakland. Are you interested?" So we said "Of course!" and hung out for a week or so in a cheap motel until the show date. Thost two gigs really helped break us on the west coast of America. For that reason alone we didn't want to pass up the opportunity. But mostly we did it to play with Zeppelin, who were incredible. The poignant part was that it was the last two American shows they did with John Bonham. So that's a great memory. We'll never forget it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Slash in Guitar World in November 2000:

On Led Zeppelin's "Bring It On Home":

"Anybody's who's ever heard me play can trace a direct line back to Jimmy Page. This is where I got religious carrying around a Les Paul and a Marshall. I've jammed on this song for years - it's so simple, yet so profoundly heavy. It starts with that slow, traditional boogie, and then suddenly those amazing riffs loom up and you're in new territory. That was my first introduction to the idea of focusing a song around a riff and developing the solo from there."

Link to post
Share on other sites

David Bowie in Guitar World April 1997:

GW: David, when did you start playing guitar?

Bowie: In the mid sixties. The first grown-up thing I ever learned to play on guitar was shown to me by Jimmy Page when he was a session man. I was doing a session with one of the many bands I had then. He showed me this riff: (plays an alternating f# barre chord to open E string, G chord to open E riff) I thought it was so cool! (laughs) And I wrote a song out of it. I played it over and over. I used that same riff on "Battle Of Britain", one of the first riffs I ever learned. It was just opening up the E string. That's made so aware of keeping the E's open and taking chords through it. And it was because of Page. So he probably started me off on "Space Oddity" without realizing it. I'll probably hear from his lawyers tomorrow. (laughs)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve Vai in Guitar World September 1998:

On Led Zeppelin's "Heartbreaker":

"This one had the biggest impact on me as a youth. It was defiant, bold, and edgier than hell. It really is the definitive rock guitar solo."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't heard about that. Could you provide any quotes? I really doubt Keith could ever confuse Roger with Robert

Nope. Don't have any quotes. The criticism was from Plant's haters, on some discussion boards and some YT clips. My post was anyway just a failed attempt of irony... :ph34r:

//Edit to thank Kaiser, Zeppphead and the other knowledgeable posters for the new info

Edited by zdr
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been reading a new crime novel called Rough Country by John Sandford, who is a pretty big name in the business. A couple of his detective characters are rock and roll fans, and chapter 15 has the following opening sentence: 'Robert Plant and Alison Krauss were working their way through 'Please Read the Letter' as Virgil backed his boat down the ramp into Stone Lake.'

In Sandford's first (excellent) book, Rules of Prey, the cop takes a witness to see Aerosmith before taking her to bed, and so it's about time somebody from Zeppelin got their due.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Excerpt from Blabbermouth.net:

"MEGADETH mainman Dave Mustaine recently spoke to U.K.'s Metal Hammer magazine about his forthcoming autobiography, "Mustaine: A Heavy Metal Memoir" (formerly "Hello Me... Meet The Real Me"), which is due later in the year via HarperCollins's It Books imprint (focusing on pop culture, sports, style and content derived from the Internet).

On being one of thrash metal's chief inventors:

Mustaine: "It didn't ever occur to me that I was doing anything out of the ordinary. Because the guitar player that I looked up to was Jimmy Page and I set the bar so incredibly high for myself. If Lars [ulrich, METALLICA drummer] had never come into my life, I probably would never focused on them, I would've focused on just trying to be like LED ZEPPELIN and none of this would've happened. But it's great to be recognized for all this. It's so fun to look back on my life now and say, 'Dave, look what you did!'"

http://www.roadrunnerrecords.com/blabbermouth.net/news.aspx?mode=Article&newsitemID=137999

Link to post
Share on other sites

"In my opinion, next to the Beatles they're the most influential band in history. They influence the way music is on records, AOR radio, concerts. They set the standards for the AOR-radio format with 'Stairway to Heaven,' having AOR hits without necessarily having Top Forty hits. They're the ones who did the first real big arena concert shows, consistently selling out and playing stadiums without support. People can do as well as them, but nobody surpasses them." John David Kalodner, A&R executive Geffen Records

"Other than the Beatles, for album radio they're the most important band. Nobody seems to get tired of them, and a lot of the new bands in that genre obviously owe a debt to them." Legendary Radio Producer Lee Abrams

"Believe it or not, we are actually very, very big fans of Led Zeppelin. They're probably one of the strongest influences that we have in common as members of the group. We do 'Whole Lotta Love' jokingly, tongue in cheek, but that's not to say that we're not big fans of the band. And I think the main reason one could find it amusing in 1988 is that there are so many bands that have supposedly been influenced by Led Zeppelin that don't really seem to understand the soul of what Led Zeppelin were about. They just seem to have taken on the cosmetic appeal of the legacy that Led Zeppelin left around. And that's unfortunate, because they're taking advantage of a generation of kids that weren't around for the original thing." Nick Seymour of Crowded House

"So many bands have taken from Led Zeppelin it's been quite incredible to watch. The whole 'Hall of the Mountain King' vibe was one thing for glam rockers to get into, you know? So all of a sudden you get fifteen American bands singing songs about climbin' up mountains and slayin' dragons and stuff, which is one of the things that Plant was into, that Old English and Celtic imagery. And then a lot of bands are into the black magic and the sorcery, which was Page's kind of thing. And then you get other people trying to base a band around what Bonham did. It's incredible that even as individuals they influenced different kinds of music. I think they're probably the greatest British live rock band. The one that had a real mystique, a real aura and presence about the band. It wasn't like a band; it was like some kind of moving spiritual roadshow. Led Zeppelin were a major influence on the Cult — I mean, we feel like the new generation, ourselves and the Mission and other new bands. I guess we feel like the new, shall we say, golden gods (Laughs). If anybody reads that, they're gonna go, 'Oh, what an asshole.' But it kinda feels that way, and it's great. I'll tell you one thing. If Zeppelin ever did a reunion tour, that'd be the biggest challenge for any of our lot. Led Zeppelin, you can't compete with them." Ian Astbury of the Cult

"I think, essentially, they were a band, and everything they did came across as a band. They got self-indulgent at times, but they wrote great songs, and when they performed them as a band, the power of it really came across." Wayne Hussey of the Mission U.K

"We started this sorta crusade when Let's Active first toured, playing 'Black Dog' and stuff when we'd go to do interviews at college radio stations. It was really outrageous to do that back then, but it was good fun, and there was no denying that those records were powerful and cool. And we also did 'The Rover' and 'Dancing Days' in concert for a while. Every few shows we'd get a New Wave-diehard type who just didn't get it, who'd say, 'What are you doing, man?' like it's a sacrilege. But most people really dig it, you know." Mitch Easter of Let's Active

Link to post
Share on other sites

DOLLY PARTON (about STH): "I love that song, and I always thought it sounded like a spiritual song. Robert Plant said he had always thought of it as a spiritual song and was thrilled that I had put the choir on it, 'cause he had always heard it like that. I believe a good song can be done any way if you really mean it from the heart. Everybody's been trying to get a copy of my version of this song. They've been offering everybody money to bootleg it. Rock stations have been calling us, and country stations just out of curiosity. I'm sure some of them think it's a big joke. I'm sure that some of them are going to want to crucify me, and maybe they will. But in all sincerity, I did it because I love the song."

http://209.85.135.132/search?q=cache:onuCnbXmdjAJ:www.jesus-is-savior.com/Evils%2520in%2520America/CCM/dolly_parton-exposed.htm+dolly+parton+led+zep&cd=2&hl=ro&ct=clnk&gl=ro

Edited by zdr
Link to post
Share on other sites

James Hetfield was recently asked how Metallica were going to compete with legends such as Led Zeppelin [Queen and Deep Purple]; all of whom have rocked the stage at Knebworth in the past.

“To top them will be difficult but we’re going to try by breaking up onstage before I announce that I’m gay,” laughs Hetfield in a chat with the Sonisphere official festival guide. “Seriously, how do you top those bands? You don’t, you just go out and do your best at what you do. There are a lot of legends that have played at Knebworth and we are very honoured to be mentioned in the same sentence as any of them.”

July 2009 of Metal Hammer- Future Publishing

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't find the quote, but Keith said he's annoyed with Jagger's behaviour on stage. The idea was that he would prefer Mick stand still while singing and not to rush over a stage like a wild monkey.

Keith Richards knocks Led Zeppelin

Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards knocked Led Zeppelin's recent reunion concert in London, in a new interview in Uncut magazine, according to AFP. He pretended that he was unaware that the band had reunited: "They had one? Well, well done Jimmy (Page) and Robert (Plant). F*** off. 'Stairway To Heaven' don't make it for me, baby... I know the fascination, but it ain't worth it, pal."

The guitarist also took time to knock partner partner Mick Jagger in the same interview, calling him a "power freak".

Richards, who is promoting the Rolling Stones' latest concert documentary Shine A Light, which is directed by Martin Scorsese, described the difference between him and Jagger, explaining, "Mick's a maniac. He can't get up in the morning without knowing immediately who he's going to call. Meanwhile, I just go 'Thank God I'm awake' and wait for three or four hours before I do anything. He is a power freak and there's nothing we can do about it. I don't want to do anything about it. Let him bugger about. It doesn't make any difference to what we do."

Richards went on to joke about Jagger's legendary onstage antics, adding: "Excuse me while I laugh. He's a bit vain, let's put it like that. (But) we want a vain bloke up there, don't we? Meanwhile, the band can go to work. Vanity will not carry a band. But a band can carry vanity."

He was asked what, if any, advice he would offer to his younger self: "I'd have said 'Lay off the dope.' That's my advice now to all younger members who are into this sort of thing -- oh, give it up, it ain't really worth it."

Shine A Light was filmed and recorded on October 29th and November 1st, 2006 at New York City's Beacon Theatre.

The film premiered at the Berlin Film Festival on February 7th, and the Stones are set to attend the UK premiere on April 2nd at London's Leicester Square.

The soundtrack album to Shine A Light will be released on April 1st, in both single and double disc editions.

Shine A Light will open in select U.S. theaters on April 4th.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Joan Jett in her new self titled book by Todd Oldham:

"I can remember getting into an argument with my mother about a Zeppelin song. I think it was "Whole Lotta Love". There's this part with all these weird noises, and we were arguing about whether it was music or not, and then my brother agreed with her. The two of them made me so mad."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

I just wanted to bump this thread :P

So, Don Powell - Slade

Q: A lot of great bands came from The Midlands – who were your drumming contemporaries as a young man?

A: John Bonham, we used to play the local pubs together with our bands, way before Zeppelin and Slade.

Q: So you and John were good mates then - what did you think of John when you first saw him?

A: I thought he was the loudest drummer on the planet! (Laughs) He didn’t need microphones – he was so loud. I admired him greatly and he was a big influence on me; John Bonham is my all-time favourite drummer. Cozy Powell was around too, I met him a few times when he was playing with Ace Kefford – this was way before his solo hits (Dance With The Devil) or (the band) Rainbow.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:NfXR9OuakR4J:www.mikedolbear.com/story.asp%3FStoryID%3D2130+don+powell+bonham&cd=3&hl=ro&ct=clnk&gl=ro

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill Ward (Black Sabbath):

"I love Jimmy


. He's bloody great," Ward said. "When I first heard their very first album, we had a bunch of songs as well, but we hadn't recorded our first album, and then somebody brought over 'Led Zeppelin I' and we listened to it, and I'm listening to it and going, 'Holy crap.' You know, it sounded really professional and everything. I'd known [John] Bonham since I was 16 years old, and I'm listening to Bonham playing his chops, man, and I'm going, 'Wow.' I thought that that album was just completely out of sight. It was so good, and I love Jimmy's chops. We just sat around going, 'Wow.' We were in a different bag. We were working on 'What is this that stands before me? …' and so we were in quite a different place, but that first album was just, like, holy crap, blew me away. Just a really very, very good album.”

"All of us — Tony [iommi], myself, and the likes of Geezer [butler] and Ozzy [Osbourne], you know, we all knew Bonham, and we all knew Robert Plant. We were all from basically the same area, so we bumped into them all the time. We'd see them every other day or something," Ward recalled. "But I love John Paul [Jones], as well… What a bass player, man. He's doing good stuff. He's always been a brilliant bass player. "

http://www.goldminemag.com/article/the-music-that-changed-bill-wards-life

Link to post
Share on other sites

i read somewhere that Justin Bieber yes Justin Bieber listen to bands like Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath and Kesha the singer who sing "Tik Tok" she is so horrible idk why she is on top of the charts anyways, she said in an article that someone mistaken her as Robert Plant thank the person because she said it was a good compliment. dry.gif I'm shock these young stars know who Led Zeppelin is. Even Kristen Stewart who plays Bella from the Twilight series loves Led Zeppelin it's cool she likes them but i can not stand Twilight it's everywhere and it's irritating my nerve cells real talk lol.

Link to post
Share on other sites

:D I found this article:

DMITRY MEDVEDEV told U2 lead singer Bono that he’s a fan of rock group Led Zeppelin over tea during a meeting at the Russian president’s residence in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.

Upon his arrival in Russia on August 22, Bono joked he would cancel a meeting with Medvedev after learning the president preferred Deep Purple to the Beatles, Kommersant reported.

Bono told Medvedev yesterday they have to overcome the differences in their musical tastes. Bono, 50, said he’s a long-time Led Zeppelin fan, while he knows that Medvedev likes Deep Purple. The president countered that he also enjoys Led Zeppelin.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/world/kfcwidqlidau/rss2/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann & Nancy Wilson in Rolling Stone #587 9/20/90:

Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart on their favorite Led Zep songs

2."The Battle Of Evermore." Plant, the adrongynous. The imagery is pretty thick Tolkien, but it really is beautiful, organic and powerful, especially combined with the wild mandolin part. I love the big scream at the end. I always think it can be heard down the ages.

5."When The Levee Breaks." Relentless. That's why I've always thought this one was so sexy. Relentless. The distorted harp is great, and I always twitch when Plant comes in with "Cryin' won't help ya/Prayin' won't do ya no good."

No argument there Wilsons!.;)

Tom Petty talking about working on one of his songs "I was trying to find a riff to put in there,and for some reason it occurred to me *laughing* ,Jimmy Page had layed down all the great riffs,he'd used them all!.:D

Link to post
Share on other sites

No argument there Wilsons!.;)

Tom Petty talking about working on one of his songs "I was trying to find a riff to put in there,and for some reason it occurred to me *laughing* ,Jimmy Page had layed down all the great riffs,he'd used them all"!!.:D

Sorry for the double post,I came back to do a quick edit.:slapface: Edited by Ross62
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...