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The Rover

FULL MOON

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Looking up, high in the sky, just after Midnight, the Full Moon was very impressive tonight.

Full-Moon-2006-04-13_23-13-RAINER-LPOD.jpg

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I always found it amazing that that little ball was able to withstand thousands of asteroids hitting it when we had an asteroid belt some 50 billion years ago. If it can take it....I think the Earth can, we can rebuild!

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The moon has NO atmosphere for a catastrophic meteor hit to affect. Our atmosphere burns up the VAST majority of meteors entering it, whereas any heading toward the moon find no resistance to burn them up.

A really big one to hit us could create the "nuclear winter" spoken of.

Yeah, the Earth would survive but we as a species would be in peril. We might make a comeback in billions of years as a recycling of evolution could take place.

The moon is down

Casting it's shadow over the night-haunted town

Mystical figures under the silence of light

The trembling air

Drifts slowly unseen over the houses there

And echoes changing into the voices of night

On the edge of twilight whispering

Whisper, whisper, whisper, whisper,

On the edge of twilight whispering

Whisper, whisper, whisper, whisper

Elusive time

In limbo active in never ending mime

The edge of twilight into the darkness of day

Shulman, Shulman, Shulman and Minnear

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Looking Good Tonight !

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/moonrise.html

Full Moon Names and Their Meanings

From The Farmer's Almanac

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac's list of the full Moon names.

• Full Wolf Moon - January Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January's full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.

• Full Snow Moon - February Since the heaviest snow usually falls during this month, native tribes of the north and east most often called February's full Moon the Full Snow Moon. Some tribes also referred to this Moon as the Full Hunger Moon, since harsh weather conditions in their areas made hunting very difficult.

• Full Worm Moon - March As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

• Full Pink Moon - April This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month's celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

• Full Flower Moon - May In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.

• Full Strawberry Moon - June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

• The Full Buck Moon - July July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month's Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

• Full Sturgeon Moon - August The fishing tribes are given credit

for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.

• Full Corn Moon - September This full moon's name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon.

• Full Harvest Moon - October This is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.

• Full Beaver Moon - November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.

• The Full Cold Moon; or the Full Long Nights Moon - December During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.

Edited by The Rover

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Looking Good Tonight !

http://www.timeandda...k/moonrise.html

Full Moon Names and Their Meanings

From The Farmer's Almanac

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac's list of the full Moon names.

• Full Wolf Moon - January Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January's full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.

• Full Snow Moon - February Since the heaviest snow usually falls during this month, native tribes of the north and east most often called February's full Moon the Full Snow Moon. Some tribes also referred to this Moon as the Full Hunger Moon, since harsh weather conditions in their areas made hunting very difficult.

• Full Worm Moon - March As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

• Full Pink Moon - April This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month's celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

• Full Flower Moon - May In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.

• Full Strawberry Moon - June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

• The Full Buck Moon - July July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month's Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

• Full Sturgeon Moon - August The fishing tribes are given credit

for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.

• Full Corn Moon - September This full moon's name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon.

• Full Harvest Moon - October This is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.

• Full Beaver Moon - November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.

• The Full Cold Moon; or the Full Long Nights Moon - December During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.

Hi Rover,

Many thanks for the info, just goes to show how little us city dwellers know of nature, i must update my memory banks, thanks again.

Regards, Danny

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Looking up, high in the sky, just after Midnight, the Full Moon was very impressive tonight.

Full-Moon-2006-04-13_23-13-RAINER-LPOD.jpg

The Outer Limits

My cat Butters goes crazy during a full moon.

:D

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I love the Native American (and other traditional) names of the full moon, they're so evocative. I have a songwriting book somewhere that suggests using one of these full moon names in a song, as an exercise. These are the neopagan names:

January - Wolf moon

February - Ice moon

March - Storm moon

April - Growing moon

May - Hare moon

June - Mead moon

July - Hay moon

August - Corn moon

September - Harvest moon

October - Hunter's moon

November - Snow moon

December - Winter moon

This is one of my all-time fave songs and videos, Echo & the Bunnymen "Killing Moon":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqvruTNSWqI

Edited by FireOpal

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When I was driving home from work tonight the moon was rising on the horizon. When it is low the atmosphere tends to enlarge its appearance and there was a thin cloud layer that it was shining through. It made an errie looking scene in the sky. Don't see it like that very often.

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Yeah, there where fun time's to be had last night! I went to a monthly songwriter's open mic to play some of my song's last night, there where a lot of people out doing the party thing (this is in Chapel Hill, NC). I don't do the party thing any more but it was great to get out and do some thing other than hang in the less-happening town I live in. B)

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The moon has NO atmosphere for a catastrophic meteor hit to affect. Our atmosphere burns up the VAST majority of meteors entering it, whereas any heading toward the moon find no resistance to burn them up.

A really big one to hit us could create the "nuclear winter" spoken of.

Yeah, the Earth would survive but we as a species would be in peril. We might make a comeback in billions of years as a recycling of evolution could take place.

The moon is down

Casting it's shadow over the night-haunted town

Mystical figures under the silence of light

The trembling air

Drifts slowly unseen over the houses there

And echoes changing into the voices of night

On the edge of twilight whispering

Whisper, whisper, whisper, whisper,

On the edge of twilight whispering

Whisper, whisper, whisper, whisper

Elusive time

In limbo active in never ending mime

The edge of twilight into the darkness of day

Shulman, Shulman, Shulman and Minnear

All true but, the earth is alive and can very easily snap back from a strike by an NEO. In fact, if you know where and how to find them you can see the crater's left behind from the one's that have hit the earth!

There is a big one in Germany with a crater that's more than 15 kilometers across, one in the mid west of the US that's even bigger. So like you said the moon is dead and can not cover up the evidence of a large impact. The earth has the ability through erosion from wind, rain, snow and so forth and the movement of the plate's on the crust to cover up the past event's.

Most all of the big impact's on earth happened a few billion years ago when our system was first formed, after the gas giant's of Jupiter and Saturn formed the heavy bombardment was over and they started sucking up (and still do) all the big rock's that where flying around then. The one's left now are in the asteroid belt in between Mars and Jupiter, most scientists believe the majority of those are quite small object's that would be lees than a problem to us if they hit us but, there are some planet killer's still out there.

The one's floating in space out side the belt are the potential killer's, every 100,000 years one will hit the earth with some effect. But the bigger one's that hit every few million years or so are the one's that can wipe out 90% of the life on earth in a mater of hours.

We get hit by large stony asteroid's every 100 years or so, they don't do that much damage as they explode 3-5 miles up in the air. So unless they do so over a major city we have little to worry about, the last one of those blew up over Russia in the late 198o's. A large iron core asteroid would be a bad thing and would kill a lot of people and may send us back to the stone age having to live in very small group's as there would be little food to support our currant number's.

Object's that small (100 or so yard's across) are just a mater of where they hit the earth as to how much damage it will cause.

Nice poem, I dig it! B)

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When I was driving home from work tonight the moon was rising on the horizon. When it is low the atmosphere tends to enlarge its appearance and there was a thin cloud layer that it was shining through. It made an errie looking scene in the sky. Don't see it like that very often.

I had the same feeling here a couple days ago. I saw the moon coming up over the sea and it looked orange and glowing. It looked weird. I thought I was looking at the sun at first but seeing as I had just seen the sun disappear beneath the opposite horizon I quickly came to my senses.

Awesome sight. I had never seen it that colour before. It quickly changed to it's usual light colour a few minutes later though.

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I was at a football game about to perform with marching band & me & some friends just stared at it for a while...

Really amasing night

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When I was driving home from work tonight the moon was rising on the horizon. When it is low the atmosphere tends to enlarge its appearance...

Yeah, my girlfriend says the same thing about me ! ! :drumz:

I have seen the Moon setting after 1am and it is a large site !

Edited by The Rover

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Yeah, my girlfriend says the same thing about me ! ! :drum

Funny Rover :lol:

So this uhm... phenomenon... happens only during the full moon?

The lunatic must be on the loose now. :D

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Full Moon And Empty Arms :(

My brother was in the Navy and he said the moon was the strangest looking thing when it came up on the ocean horizon.

Last night it looked so cool in the east and was only half lit and it looked like a bowl.

B)

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HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYBODY!!

blue-moon-new-years-eve_big.jpg

New Year's Blue Moon: Grab Your Telescope, Vinyls, and Spiritual Counselor

More By Heather Horn on December 30, 2009 4:55pm

New Year's Eve this year coincides with the second full moon of December--otherwise known as a "Blue Moon"--and the Internet's a-flutter with odd trivia and tidbits. From folklore and calculations to feng shui advice, this event has inspired equal parts scientific and astrological reflections. (Adding to the fun is a partial lunar eclipse that will be visible in some areas of the globe.) Grab an early glass of champagne--here's what you need to know practically, academically, and spiritually for the event that will help you ring in the new year.

Explaining the Confusion Teddy Patridge at Firedoglake explains that a Blue Moon is "the second full moon in a calendar month," although it used to refer to "when a fourth full moon appeared in any season." This next one will be "the first time in 19 years [that] the Blue Moon will appear on December 31st, New Year's Eve." Diving into the particulars of Blue Moon definitions and folklore (the moon won't actually be blue), he adds: "One way to enjoy two successive Blue Moons very quickly, of course, would be to travel to Asia or Australia or New Zealand, as they have two full moons in January 2010, not December 2009."

Hope for Better Decade, Less Crime While he hopes the Blue Moon will bring luck, Richard Metzger at Brand X says, whether buoyed by urban legend or no, "some evidence shows that arrests for petty crime and public drunkenness increase 5% during a full moon, and police expect extra aggressiveness and antisocial behavior from revelers whenever a full moon occurs during a holiday."

Major Astrology Possibilities PJ Jump at Leaps of Faith writes that, "from a professional Astrologer's point of view, the possibly significant predictions associated with this event are quite exciting. These various predictions," Jump explains, "are predicated on the positioning of the lunar eclipse. In other words ... what sign of the Zodiac does the eclipse fall into, as well as its opposite sign. Then, there is the astrological 'house' that comes into play in relation to one's natal chart. This is where," the blogger admits, "I become completely lost in the translation of celestial bodies and their mathematical components."

No Kidding Luckily, Robert Wilkinson has the details. "This very rare [event]," he begins, "falls at 11 degrees of Cancer-Capricorn on December 31, 2009 at 11:13 am PST, 2:13 pm EST, 7:13 pm Greenwich. Since Full Moons always fulfill the energies of the previous New Moon, this Eclipse will sprout the seeds of the recent The New Moon in Sagittarius." That's not all: "This Eclipse shows Maui has 14 Aquarius rising, Santa Monica with 1 Aries rising, Vancouver with 21 Pisces, and the White House with 2 Gemini on the Ascendant (Obama gets a gift!)." Regarding the eclipse's "quintile series aspects," Wilkinson promises to "explain more in part 2." From across the Web, Patrick at Independently Healthy offers that "the most powerful lunar days are between December 28 and January 4, which is the ideal time to start new cycles ... Shine on," he adds, signing off.

Enjoy the Beauty "What will it look like?" Asks law professor and blogger Ann Althouse. "Like any other full moon ... But all full moons are terribly beautiful, and a full moon on New Year's Eve--New Decade's Eve--seems propitious. May [it] lift up your heart and inspire you to contribute what you can to whatever can be good about the next year and the 9 that follow."

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Full January WOLF moon tomarrow night.

fullmoon-1.jpg

Andrew Fazekas

for National Geographic News

Published January 29, 2010

The biggest full moon of 2010 will rise in the east tonight, and it'll appear with a bright sidekick: Mars will cozy up just to the left of the supersize moon.

January's full moon is also called the wolf moon, according to Native American tradition associating this month's full moon with wolves howling in the cold midwinter. (Take a moon myths and mysteries quiz.)

The 2010 wolf moon will appear 30 percent brighter and 14 percent larger than any other full moon this year, because our cosmic neighbor will actually be closer to Earth than usual.

The moon will be at its closest perigee—the nearest it gets to our planet during its egg-shaped orbit—for 2010 at 4:04 a.m. ET Saturday, reaching a distance of 221,577 miles (356,593 kilometers) from Earth.

At its farthest from Earth, the moon is said to be at apogee. Perigee and apogee each happen generally once a month, but the moon's wobbly orbit means that the satellite's exact distance at each of those events varies over the year. The moon's phase can also be different during each apogee and perigee.

"This month has the largest full moon of 2010, because it coincides with the special moment when the full moon happens to occur on the same day as it is at perigee," said Marc Jobin, an astronomer at the Montréal Planetarium.

And in a remarkable coincidence, Mars is at opposition tonight—directly opposite to the sun in the sky—so that as the sun sets in the southwest, Mars rises in the northeast.

Around opposition, the red planet gets closest to Earth. This year Mars swung by at just 61 million miles (98 million kilometers) on January 27, and it will still appear remarkably bright during tonight's sky show.

"To the naked eye it will appear as a bright, orange-colored star right next to the full moon—the pair will jump out at you for sure," Jobin said.

Full Moon Illusion

Because this unusually close perigee is happening during a full moon, it is expected to have an effect on Earth's tides.

(Related: "Mysterious Tremors' Strength Ebbs With Tides.")

These effects should be modest, most likely measurable in inches, although perigee tides can be higher if there happens to be a storm surge at the same time.

As for observing the effects of perigee on the moon itself, most casual observers should notice an obvious difference in the moon's apparent size as it rises above the eastern horizon, Jobin said.

That's when an optical illusion usually comes into play that makes any full moon seem larger, since the moon is set against familiar Earthly objects rather than appearing high in the empty sky.

"The combination of the two effects—perigee and moon illusion—will be really be noticeable and spectacular near the horizon," Jobin said.

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