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Quintas

Led Zeppelin existed from 1968-1972

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I've found something different to appreciate on every tour, but if I was only into "licks" I wouldn't venture past 1971... The first rock snobs I met in Boston record stores in the 80's wouldn't even go past the first album. It was "all downhill after that".

On the face of it though, the original voice and care free feel go away after June 1972.

I often wonder how bands get through the endless repetition without hating their own music and fans. The answer for the 1968-1972 LZ was an endless bag of cover songs. I think Bonham in particular would have been a happier musician towards the end if they had continued to play 30+ minutes of cover material a night. He loved playing covers. Besides covers in the re-introduction of Dazed, the covers are a rarity from 75 on.

Really, I think if the remaining mems + Jase wanted to put a magnet on Robert Plant, they'd dust of their Everly Brothers, and their Elvis. I bet Jason learned to play all that at the foot of his dads jukebox. If Page really got a handle on his inner Scotty Moore, how could RP resist?

Edited by rokarolla

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It's that ALL of that great material from LZ1-Physical Graffiti was all done from 68-72.

Admittedly, 1972 was a good year. I have to agree that a substantial change occurred. It's as if one person left his body and was replaced by a totally different one.

Edited by eternal light

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every led zeppelin lp was a masterpiece.PG may be the best album ever made,it's right up there with sgt pepper.presence is'nt far behind.nobody performed better live than zeppelin and nobody wrote better and more complex songs that zeppelin did from then until they disbanded.that's why they still ell 20 million albums a year after they have been disbanded for 28 years.

Edited by bigledzepfan1963

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I think you're very misinformed.

Some of PG was recorded pre-73, but most was done in 1974.

7 of 15 songs were recorded between 1970 and 1972. Therefore I believe my statement that 1/2 was pre 73 is correct. If we need to get technical, thats 46%. :)

One poster said something like "4 posts and he's an expert" WTF? Just cuz I dont post on your board doesnt mean I'm not knowlegable. Also , someone pointed out that PG sold X-million copies. And your point? So did "Please Hammer, dont hurt 'em". I agree that PG is a great album but quoting album sales as a measure of quality is stupid.

Edited by Quintas

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7 of 15 songs were recorded between 1970 and 1972. Therefore I believe my statement that 1/2 was pre 73 is correct. If we need to get technical, thats 46%. :)

No, that's means i'm right (nah nah) :P

Hey listen, I'll agree to a point that Zeppelin was fresher in that time period, but can't agree they were washed up after that. If you would have said after the 77 tour, I would have said yes, you're probably right.

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No, that's means i'm right (nah nah) :P

Hey listen, I'll agree to a point that Zeppelin was fresher in that time period, but can't agree they were washed up after that. If you would have said after the 77 tour, I would have said yes, you're probably right.

Having said that, I thought they were great at the Knebworth shows.

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7 of 15 songs were recorded between 1970 and 1972. Therefore I believe my statement that 1/2 was pre 73 is correct. If we need to get technical, thats 46%. :)

One poster said something like "4 posts and he's an expert" WTF? Just cuz I dont post on your board doesnt mean I'm not knowlegable. Also , someone pointed out that PG sold X-million copies. And your point? So did "Please Hammer, dont hurt 'em". I agree that PG is a great album but quoting album sales as a measure of quality is stupid.

Don't let it get you down. There are people here with thousands of posts who probably don't have the Zep knowledge you have. Many don't even realize that so many of the songs from PG were recorded so early.

Some of the best music, PERIOD, is relatively unknown. You'll find many here whose favorites are the typical top 40, try top 10, classic rock albums. I've seen a few here though who have very broad tastes, they're fewer and farther between.

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Having said that, I thought they were great at the Knebworth shows.

I think you feel somewhat like I do. They weren't the band that you first saw but they were still an awsome live act regardless. Sorry if I'm putting words in your mouth and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. To me, the difference isn't just about changing the music or the stage show itself. That was expected and warranted. It became more a realization that the band was beginning to show the strains of endless touring and all the crazinessof the lifestyle was catching up. You had to have seen them in the early day's to fully understand how significant that change became. From my own personal perspective, that's not meant as a knock at the band. It's just an honest opinion and a somewhat regretable one at that

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I think it was Jimmy that wanted things moving in a more theatrical direction. The music suggested various moods and settings, and it was only fitting for the visuals of the stage to follow, you know the fog machine and the lights and the flames around the gong. Remember that to this day people do laser shows for Led Zeppelin. While they certainly did come onstage looking like lumberjacks many times in the old days and the music spoke for itself, I think the dragon suits and the lasers helped enhance the experience. In the end you've got to face the fact that Led Zeppelin in its fullest bloom was going to have bombast and excess.

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I think it was Jimmy that wanted things moving in a more theatrical direction. The music suggested various moods and settings, and it was only fitting for the visuals of the stage to follow, you know the fog machine and the lights and the flames around the gong. Remember that to this day people do laser shows for Led Zeppelin. While they certainly did come onstage looking like lumberjacks many times in the old days and the music spoke for itself, I think the dragon suits and the lasers helped enhance the experience. In the end you've got to face the fact that Led Zeppelin in its fullest bloom was going to have bombast and excess.

True enough, and the band was gaining a more diverse audience as the years and tours went by.

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Is this a good moment to mention I wasn't keen on the dry ice at the O2? (Bit cheesy, I thought. :unsure: )

No Quarter without dry ice, cant be done, its like having bread without butter, its just tasteless.

Regards, Danny

PS, you must be getting old, or at least feeling it.

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