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JethroTull

Today's quiz

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Rory Gallagher.

Bingo! The booklet accompanying the "Essential" collection I recently bought mentions this fact. References on the web were a bit vague. I was off by 3 minutes.

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So Rory turned them down ? Wow...

Jeff Beck also auditioned, I don't know if he turned down Mick and Co. or was rejected, I don't know if Jeff ever considered the Deep Purple camp.

Following Exile, the Stones began to splinter in two, as Jagger concentrated on being a celebrity and Richards sank into drug addiction. The band remained popular throughout the '70s, but their critical support waned. Goats Head Soup, released in 1973, reached number one, as did 1974's It's Only Rock 'n' Roll, but neither record was particularly well received.

Taylor left the band after It's Only Rock 'n' Roll, and the group recorded their next album as they auditioned new lead guitarists, including Jeff Beck. They finally settled on Ron Wood, former lead guitarist for the Faces and Rod Stewart

http://www.amazon.com/The-Rolling-Stones/e/B000APYW40

gotta click on 'artist biography'.

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Some commentary and then a question......I saw Rory open for Deep Purple in May 1973 at the Felt Forum in NYC and again in 1976 as the opener, with Robin Trower and headliner Jethro Tull at Shea Stadium in 1976. (As promising as the Shea line-up was, I swore off concerts at stadiums. It rains on and off the entire day and we got lost driving there, blah, blah. What a nightmare.) Anyway, according to certain accounts I found on the web, Rory only played a 20 minute set at Shea. I knew his reputation, but never really much interest, until I started watching youtube videos of him. Couple weeks ago I bought "The Essential Rory Gallagher" released in 2008, which is where I obtained my question about Deep Purple and the Stones. 2 CD's spanning his entire career. It is awesome. Really intelligent, interesting blues oriented stuff. The recordings themselves are incredibly clean and that leads into my question. They almost sound TOO CLEAN. Does anybody know what I'm talking about?

Edited by JethroTull

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Couple weeks ago I bought "The Essential Rory Gallagher" released in 2008, which is where I obtained my question about Deep Purple and the Stones. 2 CD's spanning his entire career. It is awesome. Really intelligent, interesting blues oriented stuff. The recordings themselves are incredibly clean and that leads into my question. They almost sound TOO CLEAN. Does anybody know what I'm talking about?

This gentleman with the pretty lady might be able to help you with matters of cleanliness.

IMG_0097.jpg

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Wonder how their bands would have sounded if Trower had replaced Blackmore or Taylor?? No matter, Taylor wasn't much influence in the Stones, and quite frankly Brian Jones-Stones was the best anyways...

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Wonder how their bands would have sounded if Trower had replaced Blackmore or Taylor?? No matter, Taylor wasn't much influence in the Stones, and quite frankly Brian Jones-Stones was the best anyways...

THAT is crazy! :rolleyes:

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Wonder how their bands would have sounded if Trower had replaced Blackmore or Taylor?? No matter, Taylor wasn't much influence in the Stones, and quite frankly Brian Jones-Stones was the best anyways...

WHAT?????????? :slapface:

Taylor was a HUGE influence in the Stones' sound from 1971-74. Don't kid yourself.

As far as what era was the "best", that's personal opinion, not fact. A lot of people think Ron Wood is the cat's ass, I'm just not one of them. But if that's what people dig...

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Agreed, I'm just partial to Brian Jones.

And I'm just partial to Mick Taylor. :lol:

But hey, they were both great in their own way. :D

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In some ways I prefer the early Brian Jones period in the studio, whereas I prefer the Mick Taylor era for their live shows. I only like a little of the Ron Wood period.

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But I do like the later Stones stuff also, mainly cuz of Keith. The best 45 ever released that I still have is Waiting On A Friend w/ side B being Little T&A. You couldn't have found any more 45's that fucking good, if there were any others. The only other good 45 like that was Ozzy's "Flyin High Again" with the live version of "I Don't Know" as the B side. But that Stones 45 still makes me all warm and fuzzy inside. :wub:

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Who was asked to replace Blackmore in Deep Purple AND Mick Taylor in the Rolling Stones. Both offers were turned down....

Gosh, look at who else auditioned for the Stones after Mick Taylor split,

The Stones used the recording sessions in Munich to audition replacements for Taylor. Guitarists as stylistically far-flung as Humble Pie lead Peter Frampton and ex-Yardbirds virtuoso Jeff Beck (I already mentioned him) were auditioned. Rory Gallagher and Shuggie Otis also dropped by the Munich sessions.

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Gosh, look at who else auditioned for the Stones after Mick Taylor split,

The Stones used the recording sessions in Munich to audition replacements for Taylor. Guitarists as stylistically far-flung as Humble Pie lead Peter Frampton and ex-Yardbirds virtuoso Jeff Beck (I already mentioned him) were auditioned. Rory Gallagher and Shuggie Otis also dropped by the Munich sessions.

Not only was Frampton considered, so was his Pie-mate Steve Marriott. That would never fly either, as Steve was a far better singer than Mick.

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I'm glad Frampton didn't make the cut or else we'd have not been given that great gift of 'Frampton Comes Alive'.

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Now the way this thread was moving I was expecting to hear praise for Frampton Comes Alive. If you were around when that LP came out you MUST remember how monumental it was.

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Now the way this thread was moving I was expecting to hear praise for Frampton Comes Alive. If you were around when that LP came out you MUST remember how monumental it was.

I remember, it was monumental shit. Could we get back on topic - Rory Gallagher.

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Some Tasty info,

Taste (originally "The Taste") was formed in Cork, Ireland in August 1966 as a trio consisting of Rory Gallagher on guitars & vocals, Eric Kitteringham on bass, and Norman Damery on drums. In their early years Taste toured in Hamburg and Ireland before becoming regulars at Maritime Hotel, an R&B club in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

In 1968 Taste began performing in the UK where the original lineup split up. The new lineup formed with Richard McCracken on bass and John Wilson on drums. The new Taste moved permanently to London where they signed with the record label Polydor. While with Polydor, Taste began touring the United States and Canada with the British supergroup Blind Faith. In 1969 Taste released their first two studio recordings, the self-titled "Taste" first and "On The Boards" soon following, the latter showing Rory and the band's jazz influences with Gallagher playing saxophone on numerous tracks. In November, the band, along with Yes, opened for Cream at Cream's farewell concerts.

Perhaps their most notable performance came in 1970 as part of the Isle of Wight Festival, joining such notable musicians as Jimi Hendrix and The Who. They were well-received by those in attendance, ultimately being called back for five encores. Later the same year Taste would once more tour Europe before performing their last show on New Year's Eve in Belfast. In 1970 Taste split leaving frontman Rory Gallagher to pursue his solo career.

Some years after the band's untimely split, earlier recordings featuring the original lineup emerged. These are rough and ready runthroughs, some of which would have had appeared on the first Taste album. Fascinating for fans, not least because of the quality of Gallagher's guitar playing is not evident. Whereas his fretwork would appear on the later version, the solo slots here are filled by his harmonica playing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taste_(band)

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I used to read about Rory in Creem magazine. Isn't he Irish?

**never mind I wasn't quick enough. you answered my question above.

Edited by Ladymadcap

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