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BUCK'EYE' DOC

1969 The Year That Defined An Era

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Yeah. It was not all glorious stuff was it. I'm happy that you managed to come around but there are so many who didn't. I know that I'm making it all sound bad, which it wasn't. I just find the bad to be really bad and aside from the music, the good just not good enough.

I wonder how many committed suicide (I came very close) from not just acid but all the other types of drugs that were going around in '69.

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^well atleast people were not putting bad acid/pyschotrophic drugs in drinks at bars. i had that and will never forget it.

Yeah, that's as low as it gets. <_<

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1969 had Woodstock..which was a failed experiment at the "Hippie Dream" and Altamont..which was the end of the "Hippie Dream."

Living in San Francisco at the time I didn't even know where Altamont was (50 miles east) and I'm damned glad I didn't go. I'll never understand why they held it in December? And then letting the Angels be 'security' had to be the mistake of the decade. They used to come to the concerts in Golden Gate Park and pretty much intimidate the crowds and they would always stomp some poor bastard into the ground (my friend Sam included). Sure, there was the episode with Hells Angel Chocolate George when the Hippies took up a donation to get him out of jail that placated the Angels for a while, but that all went out the window at Altamont with the 'Pool Stick Brigade'

<_<

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Me and my friend Paul went to see Gimme Shelter when it first came out down on Market Street in San Francisco. When we got there there were about 50 choppers lined up outside the theater and the Angels had all come to see themselves on the big screen. I'm sure all the 'Sidewalk Commandos' were creaming their jeans at the sight of all the bikes. :lol: But all the Angels were sitting down front and me and Paul stayed WAY in the back!! :D I remember that version was pretty uncut and they showed the big naked fat guy getting his head whomped by the Angels. Pretty fuckin' sad.

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I wonder how many committed suicide (I came very close) from not just acid but all the other types of drugs that were going around in '69.

I'm sure the numbers are fairly high :( I'd also say not just from the drugs but the disillusionment many felt when the movement ended, the war was still going on etc.

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I wonder how many committed suicide (I came very close) from not just acid but all the other types of drugs that were going around in '69.

I don't know. What I can say though is there were many who OD'd unintentionally.

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According to TIME, the year that changed the world was 1968. B)

I think it could be argued that 67-70 was one very long year. 68 was probably the peak. 69 the beginning of the end

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I think it could be argued that 67-70 was one very long year. 68 was probably the peak. 69 the beginning of the end

:yesnod: :yesnod:

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I'm sure the numbers are fairly high :( I'd also say not just from the drugs but the disillusionment many felt when the movement ended, the war was still going on etc.

It really was a time of paranoia and you saw it mainly among the young.

I remember there was a concert in the park that was broadcast live on the radio and the Black Panthers took over the mic and the guy said to the crowd: 'You all ain't gonna change nothin' by playin' no damned rock and roll!' and someone in the audience yelled: 'FUCK YOU!!!'

But if you go carryin' pictures of chairman Mao

You ain't gonna make it with anyone anyhow!!

'Ol Johnny had sense.

B)

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What I can say though is there were many who OD'd unintentionally.

This is very true as people began to geez barbituates and heroin along with speed.

:slapface:

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It really was a time of paranoia and you saw it mainly among the young.

I remember there was a concert in the park that was broadcast live on the radio and the Black Panthers took over the mic and the guy said to the crowd: 'You all ain't gonna change nothin' by playin' no damned rock and roll!' and someone in the audience yelled: 'FUCK YOU!!!'

But if you go carryin' pictures of chairman Mao

You ain't gonna make it with anyone anyhow!!

'Ol Johnny had sense.

B)

It's interesting to hear people's thoughts on it who lived through the times (the hippies). Often as much as they are nostalgic about a lot of it, they do admit there were a lot of dark times as well because a lot of the images portrayed was more peace and love etc.

Edited by ninelives

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This is very true as people began to geez barbituates and heroin along with speed.

:slapface:

Yes and so much of the acid was cut with speed too not to mention, strychnine.

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Living in San Francisco at the time I didn't even know where Altamont was (50 miles east) and I'm damned glad I didn't go. I'll never understand why they held it in December? And then letting the Angels be 'security' had to be the mistake of the decade. They used to come to the concerts in Golden Gate Park and pretty much intimidate the crowds and they would always stomp some poor bastard into the ground (my friend Sam included). Sure, there was the episode with Hells Angel Chocolate George when the Hippies took up a donation to get him out of jail that placated the Angels for a while, but that all went out the window at Altamont with the 'Pool Stick Brigade'

<_<

One of the biggest misconceptions the entire "Berkeley Society" of the Hippie Movement had was the mindset of the Angels. They constantly applauded their rebelliousness towards the San Fran Police and continually assumed wrong they were aligned with the Hippie Movement when in fact the Angels were always and will always be about one thing: themselves.

Sonny Barger's autobio has a decent take on Altamont. While I don't necessarily agree with both sides about what exactly happened, I do agree with Barger on one key point: If you expect the Hell's Angels to bounce your party and roll over when they feel disrespected, you're an absolute fool to have them there to begin with.

There were no winners, only casualities at Altamont. Human and cultural.

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There were no winners, only casualities at Altamont. Human and cultural.

For the most part though, Altamont was an abberation. Most big fests were fairly peaceful and succesful, at least in the music sense and fun gatherings. They were always fringe problems, but not the magnitude of Altamont.

Well, the Who stampeded was a real drag, the Woodstock reunion '94 was a disaster too. But that was because of all the slamming skinheaded punks who weren't there for the type of experience concert goers went to the original Woodstock for. The '94 times were different, the hippie idealism was gone.

As much as Altamont seems to define the end of an era or movement, I just think it was a sore point along the way, not a end all. I went to many big fests and all were peaceful, cept the '92 Lollapalooza where people got cold and started bonfires in the lawn from blankets and parts of the wooden fence ! :lol:

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For the most part though, Altamont was an abberation. Most big fests were fairly peaceful and succesful, at least in the music sense and fun gatherings. They were always fringe problems, but not the magnitude of Altamont.

Well, the Who stampeded was a real drag, the Woodstock reunion '94 was a disaster too. But that was because of all the slamming skinheaded punks who weren't there for the type of experience concert goers went to the original Woodstock for. The '94 times were different, the hippie idealism was gone.

As much as Altamont seems to define the end of an era or movement, I just think it was a sore point along the way, not a end all. I went to many big fests and all were peaceful, cept the '92 Lollapalooza where people got cold and started bonfires in the lawn from blankets and parts of the wooden fence ! :lol:

Well I have to somewhat disagree as I think Altimont was at the very least, signaling the end and Isle Of Wight confirmed it. This was due to a variety of reasons but nontheless it pretty much ended big festivals for many who were around at the time. As for festivals of another era, I cannot really speak for those.

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Well I have to somewhat disagree as I think Altimont was at the very least, signaling the end and Isle Of Wight confirmed it. This was due to a variety of reasons but nontheless it pretty much ended big festivals for many who were around at the time. As for festivals of another era, I cannot really speak for those.

B)http://www.nojazzfest.com/

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Well I have to somewhat disagree as I think Altimont was at the very least, signaling the end and Isle Of Wight confirmed it. This was due to a variety of reasons but nontheless it pretty much ended big festivals for many who were around at the time. As for festivals of another era, I cannot really speak for those.

Yeah, I agree, Isle of Wight was a disaster in FINANCIAL concerns, but not musically. Woodstock was great, Watkins Glen was great, Atlanta Pop, Texas Pop, Miami Pop, the Newport Fests, The 70s big fests were generally good, 100,000 + crowds and very little violence and problems. So I don't agree that Altamont was an ending signal except for the fact that it was the last month of the 60s. But concert Festivals went on and were successful. California Jam, I could go on and on really.

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Yeah, I agree, Isle of Wight was a disaster in FINANCIAL concerns, but not musically. Woodstock was great, Watkins Glen was great, Atlanta Pop, Texas Pop, Miami Pop, the Newport Fests, The 70s big fests were generally good, 100,000 + crowds and very little violence and problems. So I don't agree that Altamont was an ending signal except for the fact that it was the last month of the 60s. But concert Festivals went on and were successful. California Jam, I could go on and on really.

Goodpoints and valid ones too. I suppose that from my point of view, it signaled an awakening amoung so many and for those people the fantasy left and the reality stuck around. I guess it would not be a stretch to call it a beginning instead of an end

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For instance,

Here's the largest gathering I ever went to. The headliners were the B-52s and The Saturday Night Live Band.

EARTH DAY 1990; April 22

Music and, Oh Yes, Earth Day in Park

Published: April 23, 1990

So many people converged on Central Park for Earth Day yesterday that Beth Cramer, sitting on the park's Great Lawn, could not see many of the speakers denouncing the degradation of the environment on the dais in front of her.

But others at the Earth Day observance yesterday were apparently drawn more to the promise of a beautiful spring day and free music in the sun than they were to the prospect of a political rally. They Came to Hear the Bands Jim Herro, 31, was reclining on a plastic lounge chair surrounded with muddy leavings of the Sunday newspapers. He said he had come early in the morning with 16 friends from the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn to ''see the bands play.''

Organizers bragged about the size of the crowd, saying it was one and a half million people. Such numbers are always a difficult to pin down, but even the lower police estimate of three-quarters of a million would make the gathering one of the largest ever in Central Park.

The Police Department said there there were no unruly incidents and no arrests. As the crowd departed, there was litter left behind, but organizers had cleanup crews ready, and before dark there was scarcely a cigarette butt to be seen. During the event, the recycling cans that had been provided showed that not everybody understood: there were potato chip bags and much other non-recyclable debris among the cans and bottles.

edited from

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...nyt&emc=rss

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:console:

A little treat from last year ;)

Very nice B)

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