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Robert Plant rejuvenated by Nashville


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I haven't spoken to Robert recently so I won't bother trying to guess why he chose to work in Nashville. Probably something to do with the fact that he was working with Alison Krauss & T Bone but what do I know.

Edited by Aligula
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Incidentally, did anyone see the plea Lilly Allen made to her fans?

She begged them to buy her album so that she can be No.1 In the US charts and in her note she said something like "At the moment I'm sitting behind Robert Plant & Alison Krauss who are quite rightly No.1"

Yay:)

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Incidentally, did anyone see the plea Lilly Allen made to her fans?

She begged them to buy her album so that she can be No.1 In the US charts and in her note she said something like "At the moment I'm sitting behind Robert Plant & Alison Krauss who are quite rightly No.1"

Yay:)

Just read about that a few minutes ago.

I don't know why but it seems a bit...eh, desperate to me. Does sale really mean that much? Of course it's important, but I think most of her fans already have her album by now. People buy music when they're interested. If her album is good(I haven't heard it til now, maybe I should check it out) then it will run the naturl course and go to Nr.1.

Just my thoughts.

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Agreed. It does seem desperate. Gone are the days when artists remained just a little bit mysterious eh!!

Her lyrics seem terrible but supposedly she's actually talented.

I just can't get over her ridiculous attempts to make us believe she had a difficult and poor upbringing.

Edited by Aligula
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Just found this and thought it's very interesting. ;)

So when the David Coverdales and Mark McGraths of the washed-up music world start to "look at the idea of Nashville collaborations in a different light" (as Brian Philips, general manager of CMT, thinks they're going to), they're going to have to come with a better idea than "let's be kinda rootsy and shit"--because without the galactic star power that comes with owning the lemon that got squeezed until the juice ran down your leg, no amount of Music Row Auto-Twang is going to turn this new crop of has-beens into gonna-bes.

And that's the double-truth, Ruth.

the link

Absolutely!! No one could pull it off but Robert!

Apparently, Nashville is the "in" place these days for rock musicians.

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Easier than what?

Any of Nashville’s smaller studios increasingly record recreational or aspiring musicians like me. It’s an outgrowth of several trends.

On a legal pad he had “charted” the five songs, using what’s called the Nashville number system, a time-saving trick that assigns a number to each chord in the do-re-mi musical scale, making it easier for musicians to change keys without rewriting the chart.

http://creativecaffeine.com/2008/03/11/hir...s-in-nashville/

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I haven't spoken to Robert recently so I won't bother trying to guess why he chose to work in Nashville. Probably something to do with the fact that he was working with Alison Krauss & T Bone but what do I know.

I'm not sure why it matters where they recorded the record or are recording their current one.

Just read about that a few minutes ago.

I don't know why but it seems a bit...eh, desperate to me. Does sale really mean that much? Of course it's important, but I think most of her fans already have her album by now. People buy music when they're interested. If her album is good(I haven't heard it til now, maybe I should check it out) then it will run the naturl course and go to Nr.1.

Just my thoughts.

I agree that if an album is good, sales will naturally happen.

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I haven't spoken to Robert recently so I won't bother trying to guess why he chose to work in Nashville. Probably something to do with the fact that he was working with Alison Krauss & T Bone but what do I know.

I'm not sure why it matters where they recorded the record or are recording their current one.

Different areas, different studios, different vibes all around contribute to unique inspirations and quality of sound from recorded music. It matters very much where someone records for reasons more than the few I stated. Not only does equipment vary from studio to studio and the sound within there, but there's an intangible element that comes into play as well. 'Ghosts' of past recordings sometime influence artists, and other supernatural tinges.

Robert and Alison were at least going over new material with TBone at The Sound Emporium in Nashville. They may have recorded only demo's, or laid down some solid tracks for a new album or merely just went over new songs offered from TBone and/or practiced for the Grammy show there. There was also much work done there for their previous, Raising Sand.

A Rich History

Located off Music Row in Nashville, Tennessee, Sound Emporium Studios is one of the city's longest running and most historic recording facilities. Within these walls, we've heard nearly every conceivable genre of music played by artists from across the globe. We’ve been host to some of the industry’s most talented performers, writers, producers and engineers working on countless albums, demos, and television and film projects. We are honored to have been a part of those projects. We invite you to explore our website and learn more about Sound Emporium and its past. Once you're through, we hope you decide to make your next project a part of our rich history.

1jvx46.jpg

Sound Emporium - Nashville, Tennessee

By Charlene Blevins

It’s a mystical studio, and there are a hundred stories about strange—but wonderful—things happening during sessions. The enchantment of Sound Emporium is attributed, in part, to the studio’s builder, “Cowboy” Jack Clement, legendary engineer, songwriter and producer, who, some say, had the Midas touch. Clement played on sessions, and engineered and produced records for Jerry Lee Lewis (it was Clement who recorded “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On”), John Hartford, Iris Dement and Johnny Cash, to name just a few. Clement opened the studio in 1969 and built a perfect echo chamber without any acoustical-engineering blueprints.

In the spring of 1999, another legendary producer birthed a project at Sound Emporium that indelibly changed the way traditional American music was perceived. Engaged by the Coen Brothers to provide music for their film, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, T Bone Burnett knew Sound Emporium was, as he puts it, “the best sounding room I’ve ever been in to record acoustic music.” One of the largest tracking rooms in Nashville, Studio A has a blacked ceiling that gives the illusion of being under a night sky. Structural elements, like hundred-year-old barn wood and “silo-looking things” clinch the details. And with Burnett’s homey touches, Studio A was turned into his very own back porch.

Whether it was the vibe of the room, the considerable skills of Burnett and engineer Mike Piersante, or even the spirit of Cowboy Jack, the O Brother soundtrack sold six million copies in under two years without any mainstream-radio airplay, converted or reintroduced a gazillion music lovers to traditional music, and (perhaps most delightfully) delivered a sharp-toed kick to mainstream country’s groin—payback for ignoring acoustic music for the last two decades.

http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2004...essee-1999.html

Some of their clients,

21enmt1.jpg

http://www.soundemporiumstudios.com/

So yes, it matters greatly where musicians record their music.

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Oh yeah, thanks! :D

I haven't spoken to Robert recently so I won't bother trying to guess why he chose to work in Nashville. Probably something to do with the fact that he was working with Alison Krauss & T Bone but what do I know.

I'm not sure why it matters where they recorded the record or are recording their current one.

Different areas, different studios, different vibes all around contribute to unique inspirations and quality of sound from recorded music. It matters very much where someone records for reasons more than the few I stated. Not only does equipment vary from studio to studio and the sound within there, but there's an intangible element that comes into play as well. 'Ghosts' of past recordings sometime influence artists, and other supernatural tinges.

Robert and Alison were at least going over new material with TBone at The Sound Emporium in Nashville. They may have recorded only demo's, or laid down some solid tracks for a new album or merely just went over new songs offered from TBone and/or practiced for the Grammy show there. There was also much work done there for their previous, Raising Sand.

A Rich History

Located off Music Row in Nashville, Tennessee, Sound Emporium Studios is one of the city's longest running and most historic recording facilities. Within these walls, we've heard nearly every conceivable genre of music played by artists from across the globe. We’ve been host to some of the industry’s most talented performers, writers, producers and engineers working on countless albums, demos, and television and film projects. We are honored to have been a part of those projects. We invite you to explore our website and learn more about Sound Emporium and its past. Once you're through, we hope you decide to make your next project a part of our rich history.

1jvx46.jpg

Sound Emporium - Nashville, Tennessee

By Charlene Blevins

It’s a mystical studio, and there are a hundred stories about strange—but wonderful—things happening during sessions. The enchantment of Sound Emporium is attributed, in part, to the studio’s builder, “Cowboy” Jack Clement, legendary engineer, songwriter and producer, who, some say, had the Midas touch. Clement played on sessions, and engineered and produced records for Jerry Lee Lewis (it was Clement who recorded “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On”), John Hartford, Iris Dement and Johnny Cash, to name just a few. Clement opened the studio in 1969 and built a perfect echo chamber without any acoustical-engineering blueprints.

In the spring of 1999, another legendary producer birthed a project at Sound Emporium that indelibly changed the way traditional American music was perceived. Engaged by the Coen Brothers to provide music for their film, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, T Bone Burnett knew Sound Emporium was, as he puts it, “the best sounding room I’ve ever been in to record acoustic music.” One of the largest tracking rooms in Nashville, Studio A has a blacked ceiling that gives the illusion of being under a night sky. Structural elements, like hundred-year-old barn wood and “silo-looking things” clinch the details. And with Burnett’s homey touches, Studio A was turned into his very own back porch.

Whether it was the vibe of the room, the considerable skills of Burnett and engineer Mike Piersante, or even the spirit of Cowboy Jack, the O Brother soundtrack sold six million copies in under two years without any mainstream-radio airplay, converted or reintroduced a gazillion music lovers to traditional music, and (perhaps most delightfully) delivered a sharp-toed kick to mainstream country’s groin—payback for ignoring acoustic music for the last two decades.

http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2004...essee-1999.html

Some of their clients,

21enmt1.jpg

http://www.soundemporiumstudios.com/

So yes, it matters greatly where musicians record their music.

Edited by richestkind
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Then why not Muscle Shoals,Alabama Ms Light?

Perhaps it's too much like Mobile?

Oh yeah, thanks! :D

Good, maybe someone could pin the post so that it stays where people will notice it. I don't have the ability to do that on this website, but I am sure that someone can help you.

Different areas, different studios, different vibes all around contribute to unique inspirations and quality of sound from recorded music. It matters very much where someone records for reasons more than the few I stated. Not only does equipment vary from studio to studio and the sound within there, but there's an intangible element that comes into play as well. 'Ghosts' of past recordings sometime influence artists, and other supernatural tinges.

Robert and Alison were at least going over new material with TBone at The Sound Emporium in Nashville. They may have recorded only demo's, or laid down some solid tracks for a new album or merely just went over new songs offered from TBone and/or practiced for the Grammy show there. There was also much work done there for their previous, Raising Sand.

A Rich History

Located off Music Row in Nashville, Tennessee, Sound Emporium Studios is one of the city's longest running and most historic recording facilities. Within these walls, we've heard nearly every conceivable genre of music played by artists from across the globe. We’ve been host to some of the industry’s most talented performers, writers, producers and engineers working on countless albums, demos, and television and film projects. We are honored to have been a part of those projects. We invite you to explore our website and learn more about Sound Emporium and its past. Once you're through, we hope you decide to make your next project a part of our rich history.

1jvx46.jpg

Sound Emporium - Nashville, Tennessee

By Charlene Blevins

It’s a mystical studio, and there are a hundred stories about strange—but wonderful—things happening during sessions. The enchantment of Sound Emporium is attributed, in part, to the studio’s builder, “Cowboy” Jack Clement, legendary engineer, songwriter and producer, who, some say, had the Midas touch. Clement played on sessions, and engineered and produced records for Jerry Lee Lewis (it was Clement who recorded “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On”), John Hartford, Iris Dement and Johnny Cash, to name just a few. Clement opened the studio in 1969 and built a perfect echo chamber without any acoustical-engineering blueprints.

In the spring of 1999, another legendary producer birthed a project at Sound Emporium that indelibly changed the way traditional American music was perceived. Engaged by the Coen Brothers to provide music for their film, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, T Bone Burnett knew Sound Emporium was, as he puts it, “the best sounding room I’ve ever been in to record acoustic music.” One of the largest tracking rooms in Nashville, Studio A has a blacked ceiling that gives the illusion of being under a night sky. Structural elements, like hundred-year-old barn wood and “silo-looking things” clinch the details. And with Burnett’s homey touches, Studio A was turned into his very own back porch.

Whether it was the vibe of the room, the considerable skills of Burnett and engineer Mike Piersante, or even the spirit of Cowboy Jack, the O Brother soundtrack sold six million copies in under two years without any mainstream-radio airplay, converted or reintroduced a gazillion music lovers to traditional music, and (perhaps most delightfully) delivered a sharp-toed kick to mainstream country’s groin—payback for ignoring acoustic music for the last two decades.

http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2004...essee-1999.html

Some of their clients,

21enmt1.jpg

http://www.soundemporiumstudios.com/

So yes, it matters greatly where musicians record their music.

Edited by eternal light
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