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Electrophile

5 books everyone must read before they die

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War and Peace

The Hobbit

Murders in the rue morgue

The French Quarter~(first editon)

Green Eggs and Ham :D actually A brave new world

Edited by Dzldoc

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War and Peace

The Hobbit

Murders in the rue morgue

The French Quarter~(first editon)

Green Eggs and Ham :D actually A brave new world

:lol: Green Eggs and Ham is a classic you know :D

<_<

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You know this might make me as popular as a poo in a punch bowl but I didn't enjoy reading the hobbit or Lord of the Rings!! I think they are too descriptive! I got bored reading them...

but if you are patent enough to read them the stories are obviously great! but just to get there can be grueling!

GREEN EGGS AND HAM - CLASSIC~! hehe

The Bible - eek sorry but I think it is pretty badly written... I mean if you just sit down and read it... I had to - otherwise I might be considered ignorant in my atheism - actually reading it made me even more of an Atheist because of all the random contradictions - that is just my opinion though. :ph34r:

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Oh my gosh!

I don't think I can pick JUST FIVE! (or just ten for that matter!)

For Adults (or teens who are great readers):

1. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

2. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

3. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

4. A Brave New World by Alolus Huxley

5. Angela's Ashes or any of the memoirs by Frank McCourt

For teens:

1. Night by Elie Weisel

2. Animal Farm by George Orwell

3. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (or anything by Steinbeck, really)

4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

5. The Giver by Lois Lowry

I've done 10...though I really think that just five isn't enough. I feel like I've left out many, many important texts. ;)

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the autobiography of benjamin franklin would have to be in my top five...seems like he invented everything and knew how to get things done...either motivates you or makes you aware of how lame your accomplishments are... ha!

(tried atlas shrugged several times...just boring... same with walden...found thoreau's laziness annnoying)

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Of Mice and Men

The Old Man and the Sea

To Kill a Mockingbird

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

and of course, Moby Dick!

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Oh my gosh!

I don't think I can pick JUST FIVE! (or just ten for that matter!)

For Adults (or teens who are great readers):

1. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

2. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

3. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

4. A Brave New World by Alolus Huxley

5. Angela's Ashes or any of the memoirs by Frank McCourt

For teens:

1. Night by Elie Weisel

2. Animal Farm by George Orwell

3. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (or anything by Steinbeck, really)

4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

5. The Giver by Lois Lowry

I've done 10...though I really think that just five isn't enough. I feel like I've left out many, many important texts. ;)

Night is an incredibly powerful book. I've read it several times.

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^it is. ;)

My friend's teaching it right now to her 10th graders.

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^it is. ;)

My friend's teaching it right now to her 10th graders.

I first read it in 6th grade and subsequently did a report on the Holocaust for my social studies class. I've read it a few times since then. He's written other books which I have not read.

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Murders in the rue morgue

I love that story.

Oh my gosh!

I don't think I can pick JUST FIVE! (or just ten for that matter!)

For Adults (or teens who are great readers):

1. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

2. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

3. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

4. A Brave New World by Alolus Huxley

5. Angela's Ashes or any of the memoirs by Frank McCourt

For teens:

1. Night by Elie Weisel

2. Animal Farm by George Orwell

3. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (or anything by Steinbeck, really)

4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

5. The Giver by Lois Lowry

I've done 10...though I really think that just five isn't enough. I feel like I've left out many, many important texts. ;)

I'm getting ready to Fahrenheit 451 as soon as I get done with the story I'm currently reading, and I read the Giver in 8th grade. It's a little bit of a different book, not at all what I expect but it was so good. It meant one thing to me when I 13, but now at 15 it has a whole new meaning. I reccommend reading this book even if you aren't a teen.

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a Fine Balance - R. Mistry...

Dr. Zhivago - Boris Pasternak -

Catcher In the Rye - J.D. Salinger

Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth - M.K. Ghandhi

Hamlet - Shakespeare

As to why, all these books reflect timeless universal truth about life, humans and their practice of humanity at their best, worst. Everything that exists is in this universe is immortalized in these readings.....

Edited by PlanetPage

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a Fine Balance - R. Mistry...

Dr. Zhivago - Boris Pasternak -

Catcher In the Rye - J.D. Salinger

Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth - M.K. Ghandhi

Hamlet - Shakespeare

As to why, all these books reflect timeless universal truth about life, humans and their practice of humanity at their best, worst. Everything that exists is in this universe is immortalized in these readings.....

A fine Balance was good - it made me seriously depressed!! hehe. But it is a really good book! It had to be to stir up enough emotion to actually make me depressed ...

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Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Lu Hsun's The True Story of AhQ by Xun Lu

The Life and Works of Robert Burns and Poems by Robert Burns

Silas Marner by George Eliot

Candide by Voltaire

These are just a few of my favorite must reads, but there are so many great books and authors. Authors Leo Tolstoy and William Shakespeare, for instance, should be included in any well rounded list. You should read Beowulf, as well as the Nordic Sagas and Eddas. Dostoevsky's The Idiot and Leon Uris' Trinity are also engaging literary works. Jane Eyre is another favorite and Sanskrit literature; the Rig Veda, Ramayana and Mahabharata. Those works that are of epic proportion are best sampled because reading them in the whole is very time-consuming and requires a lot of concentration. Most people simply don't have the time. Tales of the Arabian Nights and the writings of the Sufi poets.

Edited by eternal light

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Too many to name, but here's some most haven't mentioned:

Mila 18 ~ Leon Uris

Crime and Punishment ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky

Cat's Cradle ~ Kurt Vonnegut

Of Mice and Men ~ John Steinbeck

The Wealth of Nations ~ Adam Smith

edited to add: And just for you Liz (I reread this wholte thread just now)

The Fountainhead ~ Ayn Rand :D

(In all honesty, she's way too godless for me, not to mention uncaring of the poor. So to sum things up, I don't care for her all too much, much to most libertarians dismay)

Edited by wanna be drummer

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Thank God nobody posted Twilight stuff.

First Blood - David Morrell

The Killer Angels - Michael Shara

Band of Brothers - Stephen E. Ambrose

The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway

To Build a Fire - Jack London

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Henry IV

(William Shakespeare 1597-98)

Hery IV's not a book, deary, it's a play :P

I don't know if these are books you should read before you die but they're good books:

Turn Of The Screw - Henry James

Death In Venice - Thomas Mann

Pride And Prejudice - Jane Austen (read it just for the language)

Lord Jim - Joseph Conrad

To The Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf.

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The Rum Diary - Hunter S. Thompson

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain

The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway

The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence - John Adams w/ Lester J. Cappon

The Twelve Caesars - Suetonious

To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee

King Lear - Billy Shakes (eventhough, yes, its a play)

Choke - Chuck Palahniuk

Naked Lunch - William S. Burroughs

1984 - George Orwell

Edited by bigstickbonzo

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The Odyessy- Homer

The Great Gatsby-- F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Catcher in The Rye-- J.D. Salinger

Tales From Edgar Allen Poe-- Edgar Allen Poe

The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy -- J.R.R. Tolkien

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...I read the Giver in 8th grade. It's a little bit of a different book, not at all what I expect but it was so good. It meant one thing to me when I 13, but now at 15 it has a whole new meaning. I reccommend reading this book even if you aren't a teen.

I read The Giver as an adult for the first time. I read it last summer when I was preparing my stuff for student teaching. I taught The Giver to 8th graders--and though it is an easy read, the thematic content is much, much more advanced than the 5th grade lexile level that the words are aimed at. I read it about ten times--four before school started, and about six more times while I was teaching it. I told the kids that every time I read it, I discovered something new. It was quite the book.

I love the themes that encompasses the book--it's full of good ones, including my favorite, the danger of following the rules blindly. I think it teaches people the value of thinking for themselves while doing what's best for society.

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Candide by Voltaire

I have Siddhartha on my "to read" list.

I just finished Candide.

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Too many to name, but here's some most haven't mentioned:

Cat's Cradle ~ Kurt Vonnegut

I'm reading this one now. So far, I like it.

edited to add: And just for you Liz (I reread this wholte thread just now)

The Fountainhead ~ Ayn Rand :D

(In all honesty, she's way too godless for me, not to mention uncaring of the poor. So to sum things up, I don't care for her all too much, much to most libertarians dismay)

I knew if it would be anyone, it would be you. LOL

Edited by Electrophile

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