Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
Medhb

It was 40 years ago today...

Recommended Posts

They were "brutal," and "loud to the point of pain" -- and those were compliments.

Tom Murray, For Canwest News Service

Published: Saturday, May 09, 2009

When Led Zeppelin showed up in Edmonton on May 9, 1969, a number of rock fans at the Edmonton Gardens (now the Agricom) had their faces melted by the intensity of the group -- including then Edmonton Journal rock critic Bob Harvey, who couldn't write down enough superlatives to describe the show.

They were just under a year old, and only a few months from still being called the New Yardbirds -- the band's first gig under the name Led Zeppelin was in October 1968. But Edmontonians were already hip to this hyped supergroup, packing the mid-sized hockey arena.

Not Brian Gregg, though. The longtime local musician had no idea what he was getting into when the then-19-year-old guitarist and his group, the Angus Park Blues Band, were tabbed to be openers, along with Vancouver's Papa Bear's Medicine Show Band.

"I never listened to the radio, so I didn't know who they were," admits Gregg, who still keeps a heavy musical schedule as a busker, open stage host, solo artist and member of The Greggs, with his teenage sons.

"We were into the blues. We had a stack of these Chicago blues records, so that's what we listened to and played," he explains. "I was just happy to perform at the Gardens. But after we tore down gear and went to the front to watch, I was blown away -- it was so loud, and so good."

Edmonton was the first Canadian stop on Zep's North American tour, and 15-year-old hippie Kirby (who goes by one name only) -- now a respected music industry veteran -- was quick to snap up a $4 ticket.

"The album had just come out earlier that year, but, wow, did we know the songs! This was prior to Stairway to Heaven and Whole Lotta Love, of course. The big hit of the night was Dazed and Confused -- which I sure was.

"It was wild, crazed energy, this intense vibe -- the sheer power of the band, the volume. Just this huge mind and body rush when it was a tune you knew really well that you loved -- Good Times Bad Times, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, Communication Breakdown -- the music washing over you in deep waves."

Stony Plain Records founder Holger Peterson remembers the night very well. He interviewed vocalist Robert Plant backstage for the NAIT Nugget and chatted with guitarist Jimmy Page. When he met up with them again about a month later, Plant remembered him and gave the young writer his address and phone number should he ever make it to England.

"They were very accessible," Peterson recalls. "There wasn't the security you saw at later shows. And these were very nice people -- the only one I didn't talk to was the drummer (John Bonham), who was evidently in his warm-up routine."

Bonham died in 1980, and the band folded thereafter. Page, Plant and bassist John Paul Jones collaborated with a host of other artists and groups, including The Firm (Page), Alison Krauss (Plant), Butthole Surfers (Jones), and even with each other, especially Page and Plant.

In 2007, the remaining members brought Bonham's son Jason in for a reunion show at a benefit in the name of deceased legendary music executive Ahmet Ertegun. The one-time concert fired up speculation about a tour, but Plant begged off due to commitments with Krauss, with whom he recorded a Grammy-Award-winning album.

At the moment, there's no plan for the remaining members to get back together under the name Led Zeppelin, and even Page seems pessimistic about the possibility. But the ties between the three are deep, so there's always hope.

<H6 class=copyright>© The Windsor Star 2009</H6>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They were "brutal," and "loud to the point of pain" -- and those were compliments.

Tom Murray, For Canwest News Service

Published: Saturday, May 09, 2009

When Led Zeppelin showed up in Edmonton on May 9, 1969, a number of rock fans at the Edmonton Gardens (now the Agricom) had their faces melted by the intensity of the group -- including then Edmonton Journal rock critic Bob Harvey, who couldn't write down enough superlatives to describe the show.

They were just under a year old, and only a few months from still being called the New Yardbirds -- the band's first gig under the name Led Zeppelin was in October 1968. But Edmontonians were already hip to this hyped supergroup, packing the mid-sized hockey arena.

How's it going "Medhb?" Long time no hear! I hope all is well with you. "It was 40 years ago today, the mighty Zeppelin flew and learned to play, they've been going in and out of style, but they guaranteed to raise a smile, so let me introduce to you, the band you've known for all these years, LED ZEPPELIN'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND! ROCK ON!

Not Brian Gregg, though. The longtime local musician had no idea what he was getting into when the then-19-year-old guitarist and his group, the Angus Park Blues Band, were tabbed to be openers, along with Vancouver's Papa Bear's Medicine Show Band.

"I never listened to the radio, so I didn't know who they were," admits Gregg, who still keeps a heavy musical schedule as a busker, open stage host, solo artist and member of The Greggs, with his teenage sons.

"We were into the blues. We had a stack of these Chicago blues records, so that's what we listened to and played," he explains. "I was just happy to perform at the Gardens. But after we tore down gear and went to the front to watch, I was blown away -- it was so loud, and so good."

Edmonton was the first Canadian stop on Zep's North American tour, and 15-year-old hippie Kirby (who goes by one name only) -- now a respected music industry veteran -- was quick to snap up a $4 ticket.

"The album had just come out earlier that year, but, wow, did we know the songs! This was prior to Stairway to Heaven and Whole Lotta Love, of course. The big hit of the night was Dazed and Confused -- which I sure was.

"It was wild, crazed energy, this intense vibe -- the sheer power of the band, the volume. Just this huge mind and body rush when it was a tune you knew really well that you loved -- Good Times Bad Times, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, Communication Breakdown -- the music washing over you in deep waves."

Stony Plain Records founder Holger Peterson remembers the night very well. He interviewed vocalist Robert Plant backstage for the NAIT Nugget and chatted with guitarist Jimmy Page. When he met up with them again about a month later, Plant remembered him and gave the young writer his address and phone number should he ever make it to England.

"They were very accessible," Peterson recalls. "There wasn't the security you saw at later shows. And these were very nice people -- the only one I didn't talk to was the drummer (John Bonham), who was evidently in his warm-up routine."

Bonham died in 1980, and the band folded thereafter. Page, Plant and bassist John Paul Jones collaborated with a host of other artists and groups, including The Firm (Page), Alison Krauss (Plant), Butthole Surfers (Jones), and even with each other, especially Page and Plant.

In 2007, the remaining members brought Bonham's son Jason in for a reunion show at a benefit in the name of deceased legendary music executive Ahmet Ertegun. The one-time concert fired up speculation about a tour, but Plant begged off due to commitments with Krauss, with whom he recorded a Grammy-Award-winning album.

At the moment, there's no plan for the remaining members to get back together under the name Led Zeppelin, and even Page seems pessimistic about the possibility. But the ties between the three are deep, so there's always hope.

<H6 class=copyright>© The Windsor Star 2009</H6>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how's it going "Medhb?" WOW! My post did not come out, how strange! All I will say is this instead:

It was 40 years ago today

ZEPPELIN got together learned to play

They've been going in and out of style

But they guaranteed to raise a smile

So let me introduce to you

The act you've known for all these years

LED ZEPPELIN'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND!

We're Sgt. Zeppelin's Lonely Hearts Club Band

We hope you have enjoyed the show.

Well, you get the point. Ha Ha! ROCK ON!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...