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Blues Singer's Woman Permitted To Tell Her Side

CLARKSDALE, MS–Ida Mae Dobbs, longtime woman of Willie "Skipbone" Jackson, called a press conference Tuesday to respond to charges levied against her by the legendary Delta blues singer.

304.jpg
Ida Mae Dobbs, woman of blues singer Willie "Skipbone" Jackson (inset).

"Despite what Mr. Jackson would have you believe, I am not an evil-hearted woman who will not let him be," Dobbs told reporters. "I repeat: I am not an evil-hearted woman who will not let him be. To the contrary, my lovin' is so sweet, it tastes just like the apple off the tree."

Dobbs, accused of causing Jackson pain and breaking his heart by calling out another man's name, categorically denied treating him in a low-down manner.

"He says he sends for his baby, but I don't come around," Dobbs, a brownskin woman, said. "He says he sends for his baby, but I don't come around. Well, the truth is, I do come, but he is out messing with every gal in town."

During the press conference, Dobbs also disputed an Aug. 27 statement made by Jackson, who compared her to a dresser because someone is always going through her drawers.

"My drawers have not been gone through by any man but Willie "Skipbone" Jackson," Dobbs said. "Neither Slim McGee nor Melvin Brown has ever been in my drawers. Nor has Sonny 'Spoonthumb' Perkins, nor any of those other no-good jokers down by the railroad tracks. My policy has always been to keep my drawers closed to everyone but Mr. Jackson, as I am his woman and would never treat him so unkind."

In addition to denying Jackson's drawer-opening allegations, Dobbs disputed charges of unrestricted sweet-potato-pie distribution, insisting that her pie is available only to Jackson.

"I do not give out my sweet potato pie arbitrarily, as I am not the sort of no-good doney who engages in such objectionable behavior," Dobbs told reporters. "Only one man can taste my sweet potato pie, and I believe I have made it perfectly clear who that man is." Dobbs noted that the same policy applies to her biscuits, which may be buttered only by Jackson.

While most of the accusations levied against Dobbs relate to her running around town with other men, she does face one far more serious charge, attempted homicide. On May 5, 1998, Jackson was rushed to the hospital and narrowly escaped death after ingesting nearly five ounces of gasoline. Jackson claimed that Dobbs tried to murder him, serving him a glass of the toxic fuel when he requested water. Dobbs dismissed the episode as "an accident."

Dobbs, a short-dress, big-legged woman from Coahoma County, said it is not she but Jackson who should be forced to defend himself. According to Dobbs, Jackson frequently has devilment on his mind, staying up until all hours of the night rolling dice and drinking smokestack lightning.

"Six nights out of seven, he goes off and gets his swerve on while I sit at home by myself. Then he comes knocking on my door at 4 a.m., expecting me to rock him until his back no longer has any bone," Dobbs said. "Is that any way for a man to treat his woman? I don't want to, but if he keeps doing me wrong like this, I am going to take my lovin' and give it to another man."

Added Dobbs: "Skipbone Jackson is going to be the death of me."

Dobbs said that until she receives an apology from Jackson and a full retraction of all accusations, he will not be given any grinding.

"Mr. Jackson says that I stay out all night and that I'm not talking right. He says he has rambling on his mind as a result of my treating him so unkind. He says I want every downtown man I meet and says they shouldn't even let me on the street," Dobbs said. "Well, I refuse to allow my name to be dragged through the mud like this any longer. Unless my man puts an end to these unfair attacks on my character, I will neither rock nor roll him to the break of dawn. I am through with his low-down ways."

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LOL! Did you write this?

Blues Singer's Woman Permitted To Tell Her Side

CLARKSDALE, MS–Ida Mae Dobbs, longtime woman of Willie "Skipbone" Jackson, called a press conference Tuesday to respond to charges levied against her by the legendary Delta blues singer.

304.jpg
Ida Mae Dobbs, woman of blues singer Willie "Skipbone" Jackson (inset).

"Despite what Mr. Jackson would have you believe, I am not an evil-hearted woman who will not let him be," Dobbs told reporters. "I repeat: I am not an evil-hearted woman who will not let him be. To the contrary, my lovin' is so sweet, it tastes just like the apple off the tree."

Dobbs, accused of causing Jackson pain and breaking his heart by calling out another man's name, categorically denied treating him in a low-down manner.

"He says he sends for his baby, but I don't come around," Dobbs, a brownskin woman, said. "He says he sends for his baby, but I don't come around. Well, the truth is, I do come, but he is out messing with every gal in town."

During the press conference, Dobbs also disputed an Aug. 27 statement made by Jackson, who compared her to a dresser because someone is always going through her drawers.

"My drawers have not been gone through by any man but Willie "Skipbone" Jackson," Dobbs said. "Neither Slim McGee nor Melvin Brown has ever been in my drawers. Nor has Sonny 'Spoonthumb' Perkins, nor any of those other no-good jokers down by the railroad tracks. My policy has always been to keep my drawers closed to everyone but Mr. Jackson, as I am his woman and would never treat him so unkind."

In addition to denying Jackson's drawer-opening allegations, Dobbs disputed charges of unrestricted sweet-potato-pie distribution, insisting that her pie is available only to Jackson.

"I do not give out my sweet potato pie arbitrarily, as I am not the sort of no-good doney who engages in such objectionable behavior," Dobbs told reporters. "Only one man can taste my sweet potato pie, and I believe I have made it perfectly clear who that man is." Dobbs noted that the same policy applies to her biscuits, which may be buttered only by Jackson.

While most of the accusations levied against Dobbs relate to her running around town with other men, she does face one far more serious charge, attempted homicide. On May 5, 1998, Jackson was rushed to the hospital and narrowly escaped death after ingesting nearly five ounces of gasoline. Jackson claimed that Dobbs tried to murder him, serving him a glass of the toxic fuel when he requested water. Dobbs dismissed the episode as "an accident."

Dobbs, a short-dress, big-legged woman from Coahoma County, said it is not she but Jackson who should be forced to defend himself. According to Dobbs, Jackson frequently has devilment on his mind, staying up until all hours of the night rolling dice and drinking smokestack lightning.

"Six nights out of seven, he goes off and gets his swerve on while I sit at home by myself. Then he comes knocking on my door at 4 a.m., expecting me to rock him until his back no longer has any bone," Dobbs said. "Is that any way for a man to treat his woman? I don't want to, but if he keeps doing me wrong like this, I am going to take my lovin' and give it to another man."

Added Dobbs: "Skipbone Jackson is going to be the death of me."

Dobbs said that until she receives an apology from Jackson and a full retraction of all accusations, he will not be given any grinding.

"Mr. Jackson says that I stay out all night and that I'm not talking right. He says he has rambling on his mind as a result of my treating him so unkind. He says I want every downtown man I meet and says they shouldn't even let me on the street," Dobbs said. "Well, I refuse to allow my name to be dragged through the mud like this any longer. Unless my man puts an end to these unfair attacks on my character, I will neither rock nor roll him to the break of dawn. I am through with his low-down ways."

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  • 1 month later...

The Boogie man.

post-1183-0-24936400-1440292964_thumb.jp

Today we're remembering John Lee Hooker, who was born on this day, 1917 in Coahoma County, Mississippi. His step-father, bluesman Will Moore, first introduced him to the guitar and the blues and along with various visitors to the family home including Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Blake and Charley Patton influenced his decision to play. In a career that stretched over half a century, Hooker gave us songs like "Boogie Chillen", "Crawling King Snake", "Boom Boom" and dozens more, influencing several generations of artists and insuring his place among the first inductees into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1980.

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  • 2 months later...

^^ That Onion piece was hilarious!

Some Lead Belly news -- there's an upcoming tribute concert on November 21st in Connecticut:

Lead Belly tribute at Wilton Historical Society

By Phyllis Boros on October 30, 2015 at 4:37 PM
 
LeadBellyandMarthaPromise- Library of Congress
 
LeadBellyinWiltonCT-LibraryofCongress
 

These undated photos from the Library of Congress show Lead Belly and Martha Promise and at a home in Wilton.

“Shine a Light on Lead Belly: The Wilton Midnight Special” on Saturday, Nov. 21, will pay tribute to the legendary folk-blues singer, songwriter and 12-string guitarist Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter (1888-1949), who had a connection to the town.

Sponsored by the Wilton Historical Society, the event will run from 7 p.m. to midnight. The concert will be headlined by the Frank Enea Band, with Meredith DiMenna, David Anastasia of the Mojomatics, Lucia Palmieri and other surprise musical guests who will cover Lead Belly songs including some of his best known works such as “The Midnight Special,” “Where Did You Sleep Last Night” and “Goodnight Irene.”

“He not only recorded material for folk song collectors John and Alan Lomax 80 years ago in Wilton, but he was married on Jan. 21, 1935, at a Belden Hill Road home,” the society reported in an email.

He is “widely regarded to be one of the most influential of 20th-century American musicians. Telling stories through song, he blended the sound of traditional folk with blues, work songs and spirituals to create a body of music that ranks with the catalogue of Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie, America’s other folk music icons,” the society noted.

He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988.

Food will be provided by award-winning Chef Jeff Esaw of Old Greenwich, whose company, Jeff’s BBQ and Catering, specializes in BBQ, Southern and Cajun cuisine. (Chef Jeff has appeared with Al Roker, NBC’s beloved weatherman, on the Food Network’s “Roker on the Road.” And Roker has dubbed him the “King of the BBQ.”)

Tickets are $50, which includes music, food and a glass of Louisiana wine or Turbodog Louisiana beer. There will also be a cash bar serving soft drinks, wine and beer. The Wilton Historical Society is at 224 Danbury Road. For tickets: 203-762-7257, www.wiltonhistorical.org

http://blog.ctnews.com/culturecache/2015/10/30/lead-belly-tribute-at-wilton-historical-society/

 

335_Lead_Belly.jpg

http://www.wiltonhistorical.org/

 

 

 

 
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It is incorrect that playback speed of "Robert Johnson's CD" is. This song was recorded at speeds of 74~5 rpm, not 78rpm. So this song is Key of A, not Bb (B), and he had played this song by National Reso-Phonic guitar (tri-cone?), not Gibson.

 

 

 

Robert Johnson's recordings were apparently sped up past their original speed, raising the pitch as well. Many listeners may have been listening to him at the incorrect pitch and speed. Listen for yourself. I personally think that this song sounds more natural at this pitch, and much bluesier giving a lot of credit to the story.

 

^lol how the hell did that happen? :huh:

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  • 4 weeks later...

^Ghosts in the machine, Sath. Had a weird one myself yesterday. Seems like some wrinkles are getting ironed out.

On to some blues news, there's a GoFundMe campaign to help remodel the Robert Johnson Blues Museum:

The Robert Johnson Blues Museum is looking for help! The Robert Johnson Blues Foundation, managed by the family of Robert Johnson, is seeking to raise funds to remodel the museum in Crystal Springs, Mississippi. The museum honors the life and legacy of Robert Johnson, and serves as one of the sites on the Mississippi Blues Trail for fans to appreciate the area that gave birth to the blues. The museum project was envisioned by Claud Johnson, son of Robert Johnson, and is now being carried out by his sons, following Claud's passing this year.

Please visit the Robert Johnson Blues Museum GoFundMe page if you would like to contribute to this cause, or please share the GoFundMe page if you would like to have a part in keeping this legacy alive. Thank you for your support.

http://www.robertjohnsonbluesfoundation.org/news/robert-johnson-blues-museum-remodel-gofundme

 

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There's another tribute concert honouring Lead Belly coming up:

LEAD BELLY FEST AT CARNEGIE HALL FEBRUARY 4, 2016

 By admin Jan. 15, 2016LB_Carnegie-Hall-Poster.jpg

PERFORMERS TO HONOR LONG-TIME NEW YORKER & ROCK & ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE LEAD BELLY TO INCLUDE 5-TIME GRAMMY WINNER BUDDY GUY; ERIC BURDON OF THE ANIMALS; SPECIAL GUEST KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD; & MANY MORE

CONCERT PROCEEDS GO TO NON-PROFITS THE ASSOCIATION TO BENEFIT CHILDREN AND PROJECT ALS

“No Lead Belly, no Beatles.” – George Harrison

“Lead Belly wasn’t an influence, he was the influence.” – Van Morrison

Lead Belly Fest presents its first US performance at Carnegie Hall on February 4, 2016, a multi-artist, immersive tribute featuring five-time GRAMMY Award winner Buddy Guy and Eric Burdon (the Animals), among others.

Lead Belly gave his final performance in 1949 at Carnegie Hall shortly before he died of ALS on 6th December of that year. Tom Paley of the New Lost City Ramblers performed at that 1949 concert and is the last man alive to have played with Lead Belly. Paley will return to the Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall February 4.

Other performers include platinum-certified guitarist Kenny Wayne Shepherd; three-time GRAMMY winner Tom Chapin; American songster Dom Flemons; Blues Music Award nominee Nick Moss with Michael Ledbetter, who is Lead Belly’s first cousin twice removed; two-time British Blues Award winner Laurence Jones; Josh White, Jr., (son of legendary folk singer Josh White who sang at Lead Belly’s funeral); Hot 100 Singles charting artist Ali Isabella, the “high-octane” (UNCUT) Walter Trout; “Free Ride” singer Edgar Winter; New York state bluesman and Pete Seeger cohort Guy Davis; Marky Ramone of the Ramones; renowned pianist John Davis; NYC Blues Hall of Famer Sari Schorr; singer and Broadway star Dana Fuchs; and NYC folk and blues artist and Village Voice cover story subject Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton; all playing with a house band led by Jon Cobert.

Lead Belly Fest sold out Royal Albert Hall this past June in a concert headlined by Van Morrison and received rave reviews:

“The stars came out to pay tribute in an incredible ensemble of talent. ‘Lead Belly Fest’ was, more than just a concert – it was a happening: without doubt one of the most diverse and authentic productions that this venerable hall has witnessed in many a year…”- The London Times

A commemorative plaque to celebrate the Rock & Roll Hall of Famer’s longtime residence at 414 E. 10th Street, which became a hub of the folk revival, will be unveiled by a special guest at a ceremony on Lead Belly’s birthday January 20.

Inspired by Lead Belly’s love of children, proceeds from the concert will go to NYC’s Association to Benefit Children (ABC). The Association to Benefit Children (ABC) is dedicated to bringing joy and warmth to disadvantaged children and their families through compassionate, sustainable, comprehensive and integrated services, designed to permanently break the cycles of abuse, neglect, sickness and homelessness.

ABC’s humane and innovative programs today include early childhood education for infants, toddlers and preschoolers, educational advocacy, housing assistance, mental health services, family support and preservation, crisis intervention, therapeutic out-of-school and summer day camp programs, youth leadership development and mentoring.

Founded in 1988, Project A.L.S. identifies and funds the most promising scientific research that will lead to the first effective treatments and a cure for ALS. The new paradigm for brain disease research, Project A.L.S. recruits the world’s best scientists and doctors to work together rationally and aggressively toward a better understanding of the ALS disease process and, in parallel, better therapeutic strategies.

Tickets are on sale now and start at $40 at carnegiehall.org, CarnegieCharge 212-247-7800, Box Office at 57th and Seventh.

http://www.12stringking.com/lead-belly-fest-at-carnegie-hall-february-4-2016/

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