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LedZep1969

paul mccartney...

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I really like his first solo effort, McCartney. Recorded at home and sounds like it, but a great sketch pad from a time when he was on a serious songwriting roll. Played all the instruments himself too, including drums!

McCartney does that a lot, actually, most obviously on the McCartney and McCartney II albums. Tug Of War, Flaming Pie, Memory Almost Full, Electric Arguments and Chaos And Creation In The Backyard for the most part all qualify as 'one man band' projects. Aside from some rhythm guitar from Denny Laine and a little keyboards from Linda, Band On The Run is as well (Keith Moon famously praised Paul's drumming on the album.) Ditto for some of the London Town LP after Joe English and Jimmy McCulloch left the band following the 'Fair Carol' sessions (about 2/3rds of London Town was recorded on a yacht in the Caribbean, The Fair Carol)

Mind you, Paul's first 'one man band' outings date back to "Martha My Dear" and "Mother Nature's Son" on The White Album, so he was even doing it back in The Beatles (much to Lennon, Harrison and Ringo's annoyance). He famously played drums on "Back In The USSR" and "Dear Prudence" even though it was merely an open secret for many years. But even some of the Wings credited stuff is McCartney on his own, including what is probably my favourite of all his one man band outings...aside from Laurence Juber's spanish guitar overdub, "Goodnight Tonight" is actually all Paul (in spite of the rest of the band appearing in the video):

...Then of course, there's the famous video for "Coming Up" where Paul takes the idea of "One man band" to ridiculous extremes :lol: :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnHu-WLvY5U

Edited by Nutrocker

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McCartney does that a lot, actually, most obviously on the McCartney and McCartney II albums. Tug Of War, Flaming Pie, Memory Almost Full, Electric Arguments and Chaos And Creation In The Backyard for the most part all qualify as 'one man band' projects. Aside from some rhythm guitar from Denny Laine and a little keyboards from Linda, Band On The Run is as well (Keith Moon famously praised Paul's drumming on the album.) Ditto for some of the London Town LP after Joe English and Jimmy McCulloch left the band following the 'Fair Carol' sessions (about 2/3rds of London Town was recorded on a yacht in the Caribbean, The Fair Carol)

Mind you, Paul's first 'one man band' outings date back to "Martha My Dear" and "Mother Nature's Son" on The White Album, so he was even doing it back in The Beatles (much to Lennon, Harrison and Ringo's annoyance). He famously played drums on "Back In The USSR" and "Dear Prudence" even though it was merely an open secret for many years. But even some of the Wings credited stuff is McCartney on his own, including what is probably my favourite of all his one man band outings...aside from Laurence Juber's spanish guitar overdub, "Goodnight Tonight" is actually all Paul (in spite of the rest of the band appearing in the video):

...Then of course, there's the famous video for "Coming Up" where Paul takes the idea of "One man band" to ridiculous extremes :lol: :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnHu-WLvY5U

Speaking of drumming, John Lennon once famously said (when asked whether Ringo was the best drummer around) His reply was that he wasn't even the best drummer in The Beatles !!

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Speaking of drumming, John Lennon once famously said (when asked whether Ringo was the best drummer around) His reply was that he wasn't even the best drummer in The Beatles !!

I know I'm responding to a member who has since been banned :lol: but it is worth mentioning that this famous 'Lennon quote' is actually an urban legend, and has never really been confirmed. Lennon did say in the 1980 Playboy interview that he thought both Ringo's drumming and Paul's bass playing were underrated in the vast scheme of things...

It goes without saying that Ringo is the best drummer in The Beatles...when it comes to straight 4/4 time McCartney's pretty good, but he himself admits he cannot play a simple shuffle beat, and that, folks, is the sign of a good drummer, how good they can do a shuffle. Ringo can.

Edited by Nutrocker

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Paul McCartney is so great, he deserves to have his name properly capitalized in this thread title, hehe.

There were some fallow days in the 80s and early-90s but this band he's been touring with for the past dozen years or so has been his best since the Denny Laine-Jimmy McCollough Wings band.

In 1976 Paul McCartney blew me away...and the last few times I have seen him in the 2000s were equally spectacular. Do yourself a favour and see him live before it's too late.

By the way, I met a woman who has seen Macca 70 times, which blows away the 30+ times I've seen Robert Plant.

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There were some fallow days in the 80s and early-90s but this band he's been touring with for the past dozen years or so has been his best since the Denny Laine-Jimmy McCollough Wings band.

It's funny to think that Paul has been playing with his current band longer than he has with anybody else he's ever worked with and yet -aside from a track here and there- has never recorded an album with the full band (only Rusty and Abe appeared on Driving Rain)

By the way, I met a woman who has seen Macca 70 times

Somehow that just seems fucking creepy...I can't help but envision a room in her house set up as some kind of wierd shrine to McCartney or something :lol:

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It's funny to think that Paul has been playing with his current band longer than he has with anybody else he's ever worked with and yet -aside from a track here and there- has never recorded an album with the full band (only Rusty and Abe appeared on Driving Rain)

Somehow that just seems fucking creepy...I can't help but envision a room in her house set up as some kind of wierd shrine to McCartney or something :lol:

It may not be as extreme as it sounds. A seventy year old woman who lived in Liverpool during the early 1960's and followed the local music scene could easily have seen the Beatles perform dozens of times before they even made it big. Afterwards, she would only need to attend one McCartney concert once a year for the next 50 years. Obviously, she wouldn't do this unless she were a fan, but she wouldn't have to be an obsessive one.

Edited by Disco Duck

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I'm seeing Macca at Nats Stadium on the 12th! Really looking forward to it.

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I'm seeing Macca at Nats Stadium on the 12th! Really looking forward to it.

Aa well you should...after all, you're seeing a Beatle! Is this your first time seeing Macca? When he does "Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End", there won't be a dry eye in the house.

Enjoy.

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Aa well you should...after all, you're seeing a Beatle! Is this your first time seeing Macca? When he does "Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End", there won't be a dry eye in the house.

Enjoy.

When the missus & I saw Paul back in November, I noticed a few people busting out the hankies when he did his Harrison and Lennon tributes as well ("Something" and "Here Today", respectively.) Hell, even Paul himself has been known to almost lose it on more than one occasion while playing "Here Today". That said, I did not like him tacking "Give Peace A Chance" on to the end of "A Day In The Life" (and, if John Lennon were still with us I reckon he wouldn't much like it either :lol: ) I see Macca is doing "Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite!" in his current shows...unless he's only doing it because he played the guitar solo on the original, I admit I have a bit of a problem with Paul doing any "Lennon" songs at all...what's next? "I Am The Walrus"? "Come Together"? I'll give him ADITL because it was a 50/50 collaboration, but "Mr Kite"? Uh...no, not when McCartney's got tons of his own songs fans (and even members of his band) have wanted him to play for years that he still won't do.

Although I s'pose I shouldn't bitch too much...we can count ourselves lucky that he's still out there playing at the age of 71.

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Aa well you should...after all, you're seeing a Beatle! Is this your first time seeing Macca? When he does "Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End", there won't be a dry eye in the house.

Enjoy.

Sure is! I've seen clips of him live in the 2000's and he's just as fantastic as he was back in the day. For a 71 year old man to be doing 2-3 hour concerts is just great!

Also, this:

Edited by ledzepfilm

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He just played a three-hour, 38 -song set at Bonarro. He's over 70! RESPECT!

Tru dat...but it's not like he's been breaking his back doing a manual job in a factory for 50 years, is it?

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Tru dat...but it's not like he's been breaking his back doing a manual job in a factory for 50 years, is it?

No, but being in The Beatles wasn't exactly a picnic, either...as John Lennon said, "If I could be a fuckin' fisherman, I would!" :lol: Between the demanding recording/touring schedule, lack of privacy, constant media scrutiny and all round pressure the Fabs were under it's amazing they were able to handle it as well as they did. When you think of the list of casualties The Beatles and their inner circle have suffered, it's kinda sobering that Paul, Ringo and George Martin are pretty much the only ones left.

And considering McCartney is -and has always been- a total workaholic when it comes to his recording and touring schedules he might as well have worked in a fuckin' factory.

Good tune...Paul plays those awesome solos, if you weren't already aware. I love how "Too Many People" raised the ire of John and Yoko :lol: Lennon's childish (IMO) response with "How Do You Sleep?" only goes to show that Lennon could dish it out but couldn't take it...

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No, but being in The Beatles wasn't exactly a picnic, either...as John Lennon said, "If I could be a fuckin' fisherman, I would!" :lol: Between the demanding recording/touring schedule, lack of privacy, constant media scrutiny and all round pressure the Fabs were under it's amazing they were able to handle it as well as they did. When you think of the list of casualties The Beatles and their inner circle have suffered, it's kinda sobering that Paul, Ringo and George Martin are pretty much the only ones left.

And considering McCartney is -and has always been- a total workaholic when it comes to his recording and touring schedules he might as well have worked in a fuckin' factory.

Good tune...Paul plays those awesome solos, if you weren't already aware. I love how "Too Many People" raised the ire of John and Yoko :lol: Lennon's childish (IMO) response with "How Do You Sleep?" only goes to show that Lennon could dish it out but couldn't take it...

John Lennon also said, "to the toppermost of the poppermost" and while I doubt they could have envisaged to what the scale of pop's top they would reach - they wanted to be the biggest band in the world. It's like actors who court fame and use the media, then when they have the desired fame and fortune, they decide they don't want the attention and now my heart is meant to bleed for these poor multimillionaires? There is no point joining the army then whinging because you are getting shot at - It's what you signed up for.

Are you really suggesting that 8 years of fame, fortune, screaming girls and world wide recognition in a man's twenties is comparable to 50 odd years of back breaking menial work? I personally haven't experienced either scenarios; but I don't think they are. Sure, Paul had a lot of stress during period, and it is commendable how he has handled everything, but the daily grind brings its own stresses, too.

Paul could have quit after The Beatles had he so wished and retired, most people don't have that luxury. Paul might be a workaholic, but it's a different kind of work. It's a not physically demanding "job" is it? and that is all I'm saying: why shouldn't he still be sprightly at his age when he hasn't grafted day in, day out for the last 50 years?

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John Lennon also said, "to the toppermost of the poppermost" and while I doubt they could have envisaged to what the scale of pop's top they would reach - they wanted to be the biggest band in the world. It's like actors who court fame and use the media, then when they have the desired fame and fortune, they decide they don't want the attention and now my heart is meant to bleed for these poor multimillionaires? There is no point joining the army then whinging because you are getting shot at - It's what you signed up for.

I reckon Lennon's "Toppermost..." remark can be filed in the "Be careful what you wish for" category. IMO just due to his personal circumstances growing up John Lennon was well on his way to being a very fucked up individual; Beatlemania sorta finished the job on that score, as quite a few of the songs on John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band testify ("I Found Out", "Remember" and "God" immediately come to mind). George Harrison also had his famous remark in The Beatles Anthology, something along the lines of "The fans gave us their money, we gave them our nervous systems." :lol:

I do agree with you that I have absolutely zero sympathy for these celebrities nowadays who end up going sideways becuase they can't handle their fame (Lindsay Lohan, Justin Beiber...the list is long). As I always say, "If you can't handle being famous, then don't get famous!" These people volunteered; they didn't have to sign the contracts, etc, and yer correct, they're free to walk away any time they want to, even if it means taking the drastic measures somebody like a Kurt Cobain did...

Are you really suggesting that 8 years of fame, fortune, screaming girls and world wide recognition in a man's twenties is comparable to 50 odd years of back breaking menial work? I personally haven't experienced either scenarios; but I don't think they are. Sure, Paul had a lot of stress during period, and it is commendable how he has handled everything, but the daily grind brings its own stresses, too.

Paul could have quit after The Beatles had he so wished and retired, most people don't have that luxury. Paul might be a workaholic, but it's a different kind of work. It's a not physically demanding "job" is it? and that is all I'm saying: why shouldn't he still be sprightly at his age when he hasn't grafted day in, day out for the last 50 years?

I have to ask...are you a musician? Have you ever played in a band? I have, and just from personal experience, yeah, hours spent in a studio -especially if yer playing all the instruments, like McCartney is wont to do- can be pretty demanding, physically and mentally. And live performance...fuckin' rights that is physically demanding, being on stage night after night- why do you think half these guys felt it was necessary to snort up half of Peru before they hit the stage? Ball players use steroids, rockers use cocaine :lol: Again, no, it's not "demanding" like being a factory worker, but then being a factory worker isn't demanding like being a rock star. It's an apples and oranges comparison, really.

I think what makes a lot of these old rockers seem 'sprightly' at their advanced age is that they were smart enough to clean up their acts years ago...it's safe to say that hardcore abusers like Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Pete Townshend or Keith Richards would not be with us today had they not quit the booze and drugs. To be fair, Paul McCartney wasn't much of a boozer or druggie (aside from probably being the biggest pothead in rock and roll :lol: ) but then Paul's drug of choice has always been the adulation he gets from his audience, that's why he's still out there doing it at 71. It's certainly not like he needs the money...

Edited by Nutrocker

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I reckon Lennon's "Toppermost..." remark can be filed in the "Be careful what you wish for" category. IMO just due to his personal circumstances growing up John Lennon was well on his way to being a very fucked up individual; Beatlemania sorta finished the job on that score, as quite a few of the songs on John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band testify ("I Found Out", "Remember" and "God" immediately come to mind). George Harrison also had his famous remark in The Beatles Anthology, something along the lines of "The fans gave us their money, we gave them our nervous systems." :lol:

I do agree with you that I have absolutely zero sympathy for these celebrities nowadays who end up going sideways becuase they can't handle their fame (Lindsay Lohan, Justin Beiber...the list is long). As I always say, "If you can't handle being famous, then don't get famous!" These people volunteered; they didn't have to sign the contracts, etc, and yer correct, they're free to walk away any time they want to, even if it means taking the drastic measures somebody like a Kurt Cobain did...

I have to ask...are you a musician? Have you ever played in a band? I have, and just from personal experience, yeah, hours spent in a studio -especially if yer playing all the instruments, like McCartney is wont to do- can be pretty demanding, physically and mentally. And live performance...fuckin' rights that is physically demanding, being on stage night after night- why do you think half these guys felt it was necessary to snort up half of Peru before they hit the stage? Ball players use steroids, rockers use cocaine :lol: Again, no, it's not "demanding" like being a factory worker, but then being a factory worker isn't demanding like being a rock star. It's an apples and oranges comparison, really.

I think what makes a lot of these old rockers seem 'sprightly' at their advanced age is that they were smart enough to clean up their acts years ago...it's safe to say that hardcore abusers like Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Pete Townshend or Keith Richards would not be with us today had they not quit the booze and drugs. To be fair, Paul McCartney wasn't much of a boozer or druggie (aside from probably being the biggest pothead in rock and roll :lol: ) but then Paul's drug of choice has always been the adulation he gets from his audience, that's why he's still out there doing it at 71. It's certainly not like he needs the money...

I guess not many people know what it takes out of a person if one gets to the level of an Elvis, Beatles or Michael Jackson type of fame. I guess they don't stop or take a long break because ultimately they are scared of losing what they have. You see that a lot in sport; how many walk away on top? they always think I can win one more tournament, one more fight etc. A lot of it just comes down to ego - and yes - greed.

Kurt Cobain is a great example of "careful what you wish for" his story is almost a modern day parable.

Am I a musician? I wouldn't go that far. I've never been in a band but I write my own stuff, play all the instruments and produce it. It can be pretty exhausting both mentally and physically, but I'd take that over working 5 days a week, 9 hours a day in a warehouse (which I did for five years) Obviously if you are, say for example Brian Wilson, you would have felt more stress and pressure than say, Dennis Wilson. McCartney didn't have the whole weight and pressure solely on his shoulders in The Beatles.

I hear what you're saying about the rigors of touring life. But I would think that is more applicable to the early days/years of a band? Once you get to McCartney's level, as he was after The Beatles, if you are putting yourself through grueling 300 date world tours when you are in control of your own destiny - then I can't feel much sympathy.

Edited by Pagesbow

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I guess not many people know what it takes out of a person if one gets to the level of an Elvis, Beatles or Michael Jackson type of fame. I guess they don't stop or take a long break because ultimately they are scared of losing what they have. You see that a lot in sport; how many walk away on top? they always think I can win one more tournament, one more fight etc. A lot of it just comes down to ego - and yes - greed.

Kurt Cobain is a great example of "careful what you wish for" his story is almost a modern day parable.

I agree completely with all of the above, the sports analogy is as good as any when it comes to superstardom. The sad part is how many people don't know when to quit while they're ahead. I mean, Jesus Christ, how much money or adulation does one really need?

Obviously if you are, say for example Brian Wilson, you would have felt more stress and pressure than say, Dennis Wilson. McCartney didn't have the whole weight and pressure solely on his shoulders in The Beatles.

Brian Wilson may have been under more pressure than Dennis, but it's worth pointing out who's still alive outta those two (although admittedly it was a near thing for Brian as well). As for McCartney not having all the weight and pressure on his shoulders in the Beatles, once Brian Epstein died and Lennon 'abdicated' his role as 'leader' of the band in favour of LSD and Yoko Ono, I'd say the pressure did come down to Paul...why do you think the Let It Be sessions were such a nightmare? Paul was actively trying to lead, and the others -particularly John and George- weren't having any of it. Lennon may have said, "We've fuckin' had it!" when Epstein died but if Paul hadn't've stepped up, they would have indeed 'had it'. No Magical Mystery Tour, no White Album, no Let It Be or Abbey Road...every Beatles project post-Epstein was done at Paul's instigation. Let's face it, the man is driven, and hasn't really lost much of his drive in the last fourty three years since the break-up...

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I agree completely with all of the above, the sports analogy is as good as any when it comes to superstardom. The sad part is how many people don't know when to quit while they're ahead. I mean, Jesus Christ, how much money or adulation does one really need?

Brian Wilson may have been under more pressure than Dennis, but it's worth pointing out who's still alive outta those two (although admittedly it was a near thing for Brian as well). As for McCartney not having all the weight and pressure on his shoulders in the Beatles, once Brian Epstein died and Lennon 'abdicated' his role as 'leader' of the band in favour of LSD and Yoko Ono, I'd say the pressure did come down to Paul...why do you think the Let It Be sessions were such a nightmare? Paul was actively trying to lead, and the others -particularly John and George- weren't having any of it. Lennon may have said, "We've fuckin' had it!" when Epstein died but if Paul hadn't've stepped up, they would have indeed 'had it'. No Magical Mystery Tour, no White Album, no Let It Be or Abbey Road...every Beatles project post-Epstein was done at Paul's instigation. Let's face it, the man is driven, and hasn't really lost much of his drive in the last fourty three years since the break-up...

Maybe Dennis was a bad choice for comparison....let's say Mike Love, then. :lol:

Sure, Paul took over as de facto leader of the group in terms of direction, etc. My point is that he didn't have to come up with all the hits and material alone like Brian did, and in the final years of The Beatles he also had Harrison coming into his own as a songwriter, too.

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Maybe Dennis was a bad choice for comparison....let's say Mike Love, then. :lol:

Oh fuck...let's not and say we did! :lol: :lol: :lol: It's a sad state of affairs when a true talent like Dennis Wilson is dead and an opportunistic greedhead like Mike Love is still alive...

Sure, Paul took over as de facto leader of the group in terms of direction, etc. My point is that he didn't have to come up with all the hits and material alone like Brian did, and in the final years of The Beatles he also had Harrison coming into his own as a songwriter, too.

True that...George in particular gave McCartney's songwriting on The White Album and -especially- Abbey Road a run for its money. As much as I love Paul's music, George Harrison was really somebody special... I still miss that guy, twelve years later...

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Oh fuck...let's not and say we did! :lol: :lol: :lol: It's a sad state of affairs when a true talent like Dennis Wilson is dead and an opportunistic greedhead like Mike Love is still alive...

True that...George in particular gave McCartney's songwriting on The White Album and -especially- Abbey Road a run for its money. As much as I love Paul's music, George Harrison was really somebody special... I still miss that guy, twelve years later...

Indeed, the less said about Love, the better. Dennis was a talent...don't know if you've ever seen this BBC documentary? I watched it a few years ago when it first aired (unfortunately, I can only find it uploaded in parts)

George was great, yeah. The religious aspect never interested me but I enjoy his music.

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Completely forgot to post my review of the show from last Friday.

Around 8:30, a montage started to go on the screen. It featured various Paul photos, video clips, pics of the other Beatles, etc. It went on for about 25 minutes (I was very bored!) and started to repeat before a set of sparkles forming the Hofner bass appeared, causing the crowd to go nuts. A slow and steady version of The End's signature lyrics (And in the end...etc.) and ending was playing as the sparkles went away. The lights dimmed for a second and flashed bright, and Paul strolled onto the stage as my iPhone was filming. The video screens turned on and a big cheer went around the stadium. Paul did the "hot, hot!" thing that signals that we're a good audience. He opened with a powerful, bullshitless Eight Days a Week into Juniors Farm (Wings song.) The energy was flowing through the stadium and everyone knew it. Paul came on (in weak speaking voice) and said "DC, what's up?" followed by a big cheer. I think I thought that he was trying to be modern on his introduction. He then went into All My Loving, which is always a show stopper. Paul took off his jacket at this point, and explained that this would be the only costume change of the night. He changed from his Hofner to his Les Paul, covered with stickers and did Let Me Roll It, another Wings song followed by an outro inspired by Hendrix's Foxy Lady. Afterward, Paul talked about Hendrix, including the sudden performance of Sgt. Pepper he did two days after the album was released. To this day, Paul says it's the best tribute he's ever seen. He did another Wings song before changing to the Epiphone Casino, the original guitar he used for the next song, Paperback Writer. Paul then jumped onto the piano (with a plush grasshopper on it, referring to a small grasshopper invasion on Paul's back at a prior show) and dedicated the next song to his wife, and told us a story about a time him and his wife were on vacation and lying about the weather. Since I didn't know the song (My Valentine, which was on his "Kisses on the Bottom" record), I got food. He then did Nineteen Hundred and Eighty Five, another Wings song, before doing a great The Long and Winding Road and Maybe I'm Amazed. He then did one of my favorite Beatles songs, We Can Work it Out! After doing Another Day, he did a great rendition of And I Love Her and of course he had to do Blackbird, in which he rose on a rising platform with graphics. I started to film portions of the concert after this. Before the next song, Here Today, he paid tribute to John, asking for a cheer from us in tribute to him and explained that this song is about a conversation he wish he had with him, and gave us advice to say something to someone we want to tell them before they die. He jumped onto the "psychedelic piano" for Your Mother Should Know, with the scene from Magical Mystery Tour interspersed with pictures of Paul and his mother (I think) playing in the background, and Lady Madonna, which was great to hear as always. For the next song, Paul said that this next song is the first time he's played it in DC, which was All Together Now with really interesting graphics in the background. The next song was also one he hasn't played in DC yet, which was Lovely Rita. Very interesting choice for a Sgt. Pepper song. He continued the set with Mrs. Vanderbilt and a beautiful Eleanor Rigby before doing Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!. He then paid tribute to George, explaining that the ukulele he's holding was from George, and told a story that Paul told George that he learned one of his songs on ukulele. He then played Something, which was probably one of the best from the night. He then played the energetic Ob La Di, Ob La Da and Band on the Run. I stopped filming after Band on the Run, but I had to restart for Back in the USSR. He jumped on the piano for the last three songs, which are pretty much McCartney's anthems. He started with a great Let it Be, then continued with Live and Let Die, which had the amazing fireworks and explosions. I LOVED those. Then, he jumped on the psychedelic piano for Hey Jude, which is ALWAYS a pleasure to hear from him. After maybe a 2 minute crowd "intermission", he came out with the American, British, and DC flag as the audience went crazy. He did a great Day Tripper, Hi Hi Hi, and Get Back, which he alternates between that and I Saw Her Standing There. Then, to tease us more, he leaves once again and comes back to play the greatest quintet of encores you'll ever see. He did Yesterday, which is definitely something to see, Helter Skelter which was very energetic, and ended with Golden Slumbers-Carry that Weight-The End, which ending the show on a very high note (the three way guitar solo between Paul, Rusty, and Brian was great!). I was flabbergasted. How could a 71 year old man do a 3 hour show like that almost nightly? I don't know, but as soon as fireworks were going off to end the show, I was trying to leave the stadium. On the way to the parking garage, I picked up a shirt from a scalper for 10 bucks only to find that it had a nice small hole in the back of it. Definitely beats getting one for 40, though.

Edited by ledzepfilm

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