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confounded_bridge

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About confounded_bridge

  • Rank
    New Member
  • Birthday 02/02/1999

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Greece
  • Interests
    Music, vintage electronics
  1. confounded_bridge

    Are there any songs that you feel just don't work when played live?

    Generally, most of their songs were better live than studio. Whoever believes that Zeppelin were a studio band, is not a real fan.
  2. confounded_bridge

    Are there any songs that you feel just don't work when played live?

    WTF? You say that you like the 75 OTHAFA versions more than 77??? Plant's voice was not in good shape in 1975 and Jimmy did some flubs and terrible solos. Also, Plant sometimes missed the lyrics. The 1977 versions have brillinat, fast solos (except Seattle) and Plant got his voice back, compared to 75. Actually, the best ever OTHAFA solo was done on 6/22/77.
  3. confounded_bridge

    Nitpicking Page 1977

    The tapes were affected by the strong stage lights and the smoke from the audience. The problems are noticeable on the 75 tour. A note could be played for about 8 seconds. It was not the most reliable instrument, but nothing can replace its sound on kashmir, stairway and the rain song. Its "haunting" sound makes the rain song orchestration so remarkable. The 79 and 80 versions leave me cold.
  4. confounded_bridge

    Nitpicking Page 1977

    As a tape instrument, mellotron cannot get out of tune. Jonesy sometimes dropped the pitch on purpose to create this effect during the "all i see, turns to brown" part. The pitch knob controlls the mellotron's motor speed. For the 1977 tour, Jonesy used Jimmy's double black mellotron (model "mark V"). This mellotron is responsible for the epic sound of kashmir in 1977, and it was more reliable than the older one.
  5. confounded_bridge

    Nitpicking Page 1977

    If you listen to NQ jam (nutcracker) on 5/22/77 or 4/28/77 you will find out that he is using the pedals on the grand piano. "For the tour in 1977, Led Zeppelin hired a new keyboard technician named Ed Kolakowski, who had worked preparing live pianos for many artists (including classical pianist Artur Rubenstein and former Beatle Sir Paul McCartney). Kolakowski spent a great deal of time preparing Jones' piano setup and monitors, and Jones felt the piano was "spot on" every night. One of the unusual requirements was the making of a special leg for the piano: As the standard leg spacing would not accomodate the bass pedals underneath, Kolakowski designed a special leg machined of aluminum that would replace the wooden leg and thus allow the extra space for the bass pedals." http://www.led-zeppelin.org/studio-and-live-gear/1802
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