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FireOpal

Identify this guitar technique!

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There's a brief but very rockin' clip on YouTube of Johnny Marr (ex-Smiths) playing "How Soon Is Now." At one point, Johnny is touching/tapping the string with his right hand - but not on the fretboard a la Eddie Van Halen - rather, he's touching the strings just behind the pick-up. What is this called, if anything - I don't recall seeing anyone do this before:

Thanks :)

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There's a brief but very rockin' clip on YouTube of Johnny Marr (ex-Smiths) playing "How Soon Is Now." At one point, Johnny is touching/tapping the string with his right hand - but not on the fretboard a la Eddie Van Halen - rather, he's touching the strings just behind the pick-up. What is this called, if anything - I don't recall seeing anyone do this before:

Thanks :)

Not sure what it's called, but if you notice he's still using his pick on the strings. He's fingering a harmonic with the index.

EDIT: I guess it's just another way to do an artificial harmonic

Edited by DewieCox

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There's a brief but very rockin' clip on YouTube of Johnny Marr (ex-Smiths) playing "How Soon Is Now." At one point, Johnny is touching/tapping the string with his right hand - but not on the fretboard a la Eddie Van Halen - rather, he's touching the strings just behind the pick-up. What is this called, if anything - I don't recall seeing anyone do this before:

Thanks :)

I have heard the term "trill" used for hammering like in the lead on "Crazy train". But dont know of any other terms for just playing harmonics.

Cmon Jimmy!! (Page) I know you have to be popping in on occasion? How could you resist? Even if I had your money and a bunch of knockout women surrounding me all day Id find the time to visit the site that pays homage to me. I know you are out there Jimmy. Cmon!!!! We love you!!! Give us sign!!!!!

Edited by silvermedalist

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I have heard the term "trill" used for hammering like in the lead on "Crazy train". But dont know of any other terms for just playing harmonics.

Cmon Jimmy!! (Page) I know you have to be popping in on occasion? How could you resist? Even if I had your money and a bunch of knockout women surrounding me all day Id find the time to visit the site that pays homage to me. I know you are out there Jimmy. Cmon!!!! We love you!!! Give us sign!!!!!

zoso.jpg

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There's a brief but very rockin' clip on YouTube of Johnny Marr (ex-Smiths) playing "How Soon Is Now." At one point, Johnny is touching/tapping the string with his right hand - but not on the fretboard a la Eddie Van Halen - rather, he's touching the strings just behind the pick-up. What is this called, if anything - I don't recall seeing anyone do this before:

Thanks :)

It is indeed an "Arteficial harmonic" and is played with the thumb and middle finger holding the pick and the index finger lightly touching above the fret creating the bell like sound like the other poster said

If using your fingers again use your index above the fret, but use your thumb to pluck the string instead of the pick i.e classical technique.

I guess you know about pinched and tapped harmonics ??? :)

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Not sure what it's called, but if you notice he's still using his pick on the strings. He's fingering a harmonic with the index.

EDIT: I guess it's just another way to do an artificial harmonic

Ahh, OK - thank you very much.

I know of tapped harmonics, but pinched - never. Thanks again to the smarties who replied.

From Wikipedia, the fount of all knowledge (not really):

To produce an artificial harmonic, a stringed instrument player holds down a note on the neck with the non-dominant hand, thereby shortening the vibrational length of the string, uses a finger to lightly touch a point on the string that is an integer divisor of its vibrational length, and plucks or bows the side of the string that is closer to the bridge. This technique is used to produce harmonic tones that are otherwise inaccessible on the instrument. To guitar players, one variety of this technique is known as a pinch harmonic.

This technique, like natural harmonics, works by canceling out the fundamental tone and one or more partial tones by deadening their modes of vibration.

NOW WE KNOW

Edited by FireOpal

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Ahh, OK - thank you very much.

Thats spooky my above post was submitted at the same time as your ;)

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Ahh, OK - thank you very much.

I know of tapped harmonics, but pinched - never. Thanks again to the smarties who replied.

From Wikipedia, the fount of all knowledge (not really):

To produce an artificial harmonic, a stringed instrument player holds down a note on the neck with the non-dominant hand, thereby shortening the vibrational length of the string, uses a finger to lightly touch a point on the string that is an integer divisor of its vibrational length, and plucks or bows the side of the string that is closer to the bridge. This technique is used to produce harmonic tones that are otherwise inaccessible on the instrument. To guitar players, one variety of this technique is known as a pinch harmonic.

This technique, like natural harmonics, works by canceling out the fundamental tone and one or more partial tones by deadening their modes of vibration.

NOW WE KNOW

Nah we are not smart, just play the geetar....sort of like :)

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i don't what it's called, but I know that Rory Gallagher was a master of hitting that high pitched note that almost went into dog's only hearing range. He explained in Guitar Player years ago, that he acquired it by holding his index finger near the end of the pick (plectrum as he called it) and striking the string with both pick and fingernail. It does work if you try it.

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i don't what it's called, but I know that Rory Gallagher was a master of hitting that high pitched note that almost went into dog's only hearing range. He explained in Guitar Player years ago, that he acquired it by holding his index finger near the end of the pick (plectrum as he called it) and striking the string with both pick and fingernail. It does work if you try it.

Sounds like a "pinched harmonic" where you as you say pick the note with the plectrum, followed almost straight after hitting the string with the either the fngernail of the thumb or the flesh bit or both, to make it squeel. Although now i think of it maybe its a variation of it :)

PS tere is also Harp harmonics that "Tommy Emanuelle" is famous for.

Edited by leddy

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Sounds like a "pinched harmonic" where you as you say pick the note with the plectrum, followed almost straight after hitting the string with the either the fngernail of the thumb or the flesh bit or both, to make it squeel. Although now i think of it maybe its a variation of it :)

PS tere is also Harp harmonics that "Tommy Emanuelle" is famous for.

Oh, yeah, you guys are talking about the "twang" type sound Billy Gibbins made popular with his lead guitar licks in ZZ Top's, "La Grange". You just hold the pick real tight only leaving the tip of it exposed from your finger's.

The OP's video of Johnny Marr is using a light tap at the point off the fretboard where you can chime a harmonic. Can't really tell from that camera angle how he's holding the pick or how he's striking the string with the pick (if at all).

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The OP's video of Johnny Marr is using a light tap at the point off the fretboard where you can chime a harmonic. Can't really tell from that camera angle how he's holding the pick or how he's striking the string with the pick (if at all).

Just watched again and he's definitely picking the note.

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Oh, yeah, you guys are talking about the "twang" type sound Billy Gibbins made popular with his lead guitar licks in ZZ Top's, "La Grange". You just hold the pick real tight only leaving the tip of it exposed from your finger's.

My guitar teacher used to call them mouse squeaks I believe. It was a technique popular with new metal players, but it gets annoying if overused.

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My guitar teacher used to call them mouse squeaks I believe. It was a technique popular with new metal players, but it gets annoying if overused.

Yeah I remember those days well! The metal guys would put more raunch into it by stretching and bending a lot more than Billy did. It's cool for an effect but not all the time like you said.

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It is indeed an "Arteficial harmonic" and is played with the thumb and middle finger holding the pick and the index finger lightly touching above the fret creating the bell like sound like the other poster said

If using your fingers again use your index above the fret, but use your thumb to pluck the string instead of the pick i.e classical technique.

I guess you know about pinched and tapped harmonics ??? :)

Are tapped harmonics, where you fret a note then tap 12 frets higher on the string, at the same time, that is very damn hard could never do it. tuck andress does it well in some where over the rainbow

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Looks like from the video he is using the first finger to create a harmonic. (He is still plucking the string with a pick using his thumb and second finger) You could call this "pinch harmonics". This is usually done with the side of the thumb while picking.

His guitar sound is so heavily processed through chorus effect that you can't hear the effect.

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