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selection7

Immigrant Song block chord?

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Hmmmm, I dont' see a 'musician's' forum so...

Can anyone that gets Guitar World magazine tell me what that "block" chord was that Jimmy refers to in that Dec.(?)2010 issue where he is talking about the Immigrant Song outro? I read that on the newsstands but forgot what the chord was by the time I thought about it again at home. The online article features everything but the tab and I presume that Jimmy revealed to the tab author or interviewer what the chord was. The guitar world transcription was definitely different than how the Hal Leonard zeppelin 'wheatfield' collection one tabs it (and apparently others).

(For further clarification, I'm talking about near the end where every few measures they all take a quick stop to play a single beat in unison.)

http://www.guitarwor..._iii?page=0%2C1

"PAGE: It’s a block chord that people never get right. It pulls the whole tension of the piece into another area or another dimension just for that moment. And a bit of backward echo makes it a bit more complete. "

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See 'Musician's Corner' at the bottom of the front page.

I think the chord is:

A: 3

D: mute

G: 3

B: 3

No idea what it's called.

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I think you are on about a C7 open chord.

It's near the end and follws the F# riff.

I think the riff plays 3 times and then go to the C7.

Hope this helps

Curt

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Thanks for moving the post mod. I figured the musician's forum had been scrapped only because (I realize now) I had gotten myself in the Main Forum Subforums directory, which doesn't include this one.

Bouillon, though that's close to what I vaguely remember, I have to ask if you are getting that literally from the recent magazine article tab...partially because it's hard to believe I could forget a chord shape so simple (though it wouldn't be the first time my absent mind failed me) but mainly because Jimmy himself suggested previous tabs had been incorrect and simply muting the questionable D string doesn't exactly seem like a revelation.

A quick check of other tabs I have shows it being tabbed in these other ways that are similar except that extra D-string note.

"Volume I"

A: 3

D: 5

G: 3

B: 3

and

"Led Zeppelin 3"

A: 3

D: 2

G: 3

B: 3

Edited by selection7

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Thanks for moving the post mod. I figured the musician's forum had been scrapped only because (I realize now) I had gotten myself in the Main Forum Subforums directory, which doesn't include this one.

Bouillon, though that's close to what I vaguely remember, I have to ask if you are getting that literally from the recent magazine article tab...partially because it's hard to believe I could forget a chord shape so simple (though it wouldn't be the first time my absent mind failed me) but mainly because Jimmy himself suggested previous tabs had been incorrect and simply muting the questionable D string doesn't exactly seem like a revelation.

A quick check of other tabs I have shows it being tabbed in these other ways that are similar except that extra D-string note.

"Volume I"

A: 3

D: 5

G: 3

B: 3

and

"Led Zeppelin 3"

A: 3

D: 2

G: 3

B: 3

No, it's not from the article.

I too have 'Vol 1', and the 3533 just sounds wrong. I checked this first, then went online to some tabs page.

As for 3233, this sounds closer than 3533, but I think the 2 adds too much dissonance compared with 3x33.

Maybe when JP launches his website, we can ask him? ;)

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No, it's not from the article.

I too have 'Vol 1', and the 3533 just sounds wrong. I checked this first, then went online to some tabs page.

As for 3233, this sounds closer than 3533, but I think the 2 adds too much dissonance compared with 3x33.

Maybe when JP launches his website, we can ask him? ;)

It's the 3233 chord.

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It's the 3233 chord.

The fingering is in fact :

E:

B: 3

G: 3

D: 2

A: 3

E:

The name of the chord is actually C9 in case anyone is wondering.

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I appreciate the anwers from you both, but still...no info how you came to that conclusion.

That is, I still want to know what Guitar World Dec.2010 said it was. And maybe that's what both of you two were telling me, but you didn't specifically say so.

Edited by selection7

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The name of the chord is actually C9 in case anyone is wondering.

Well, Page referes to it in the interview as an 'unusual G chord' :(

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Well, Page referes to it in the interview as an 'unusual G chord' :(

The C9 was just according to the sheet music I have for Immigrant song.

Now if Jimmy stated that it was an unusual G chord the C9 aka "3233" wouldn't make sense because there's no G note in that chord (the notes being C, E, B-flat, and D), whereas the notes in the so called "3533 chord" that was proposed earlier would make sense (The notes in that chord are C, G, B-flat, and D). I'm not sure what you would call this chord, but it is some form of G considering that all three notes of the G-Minor Triad are present (G, B-flat, and D).

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No, it's not from the article.

I too have 'Vol 1', and the 3533 just sounds wrong. I checked this first, then went online to some tabs page.

As for 3233, this sounds closer than 3533, but I think the 2 adds too much dissonance compared with 3x33.

Maybe when JP launches his website, we can ask him? ;)

I was just playing Immigrant song using the "3533" chord, and to my ear it sounds like it fits a bit better than "3233," I don't have perfect pitch or anything, but it sounds like it works to me (I'm not saying this is the answer though). :)

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To be clear, my point of view is that short of the possibility that Jimmy mentioned the chord, showed the interviewer, but the interviewer forgot or Guitar World's left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing and published a previously transcribed tab without the updated chord...

...There's no point in starting a debate when we don't have to. Nor should we have to try out different chords or ask Jimmy on his website. He already told us right there in a widely published magazine (and seemed to suggest that past tabs, including the ones I just posted were wrong) and if one of the dozens or more forum members who own that issue manage to read this thread, then hopefullly we'll know.

So to whoever does have that issue, thank you in advance for letting us all know. B)

I just don't want someone who has the issue to skim this thread and not reply because they think the orginal question about the magazine has been answered.

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Just been checking if I had the GW 2010 article you're so keen on finding, and I don't. :slapface:

But... I do have the GW July '03 which tabs out the HTWWW version of Immigrant Song, and just to add to the confusion there is yet another different version of "that" chord for consideration:

E x

B 3

G 3

D 0

A x

E 3

On its own that's a straightforward Gm chord, but in this context - with the bass guitar definitely playing a C underneath - a C9 (no 3rd)

Tabs, eh! Don't you just love them?

For what it's worth I think that this "multiple tabs" situation is telling us that the notes Bb & D (on the G & B strings) are the important ones, and that it's probably not too important which version of the chord you play.

If your band is tight, the sound is good & the crowd is jumping is anyone really going to come up to you after the gig and quibble over whether you should be playing an E or a G in the middle of the chord?

Edited by huw

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Just been checking if I had the GW 2010 article you're so keen on finding, and I don't. :slapface:

But... I do have the GW July '03 which tabs out the HTWWW version of Immigrant Song, and just to add to the confusion there is yet another different version of "that" chord for consideration:

E x

B 3

G 3

D 0

A x

E 3

On its own that's a straightforward Gm chord, but in this context - with the bass guitar definitely playing a C underneath - a C9 (no 3rd)

Tabs, eh! Don't you just love them?

For what it's worth I think that this "multiple tabs" situation is telling us that the notes Bb & D (on the G & B strings) are the important ones, and that it's probably not too important which version of the chord you play.

If your band is tight, the sound is good & the crowd is jumping is anyone really going to come up to you after the gig and quibble over whether you should be playing an E or a G in the middle of the chord?

I play it like that, only I fret the Bb on the 1st fret of the a string as well.

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The article is from the November 2010 issue. The link in the first post doesn't work for me. Sounds like Jimmy is saying it's an inverted G minor? So if I understand, the notes of this mystery chord would be B-flat, G, D.

GW While “Immigrant Song” is built around a very straightforward, pile-driving riff, it’s the subtle variations in it that make it more than just another hard rock song. For example, toward the very end of the song, instead of playing a straight G minor for the accents, you play this very astringent inversion of that chord that really adds some bite. Where did that come from?

PAGE It’s a block chord that people never get right. It pulls the whole tension of the piece into another area or another dimension just for that moment. And a bit of backward echo makes it a bit more complete. It’s putting all these elements together that makes the music have depth.

I have to say that Robert’s input on that song was also absolutely magnificent. His sort of “Bali Ha’i” [a song from the classic Broadway musical South Pacific] melody line was really inspired and completely spontaneous. I can remember working on “Immigrant Song” and all the pieces coming together: John Bonham and I playing the riff, putting in the E to A [Link Wray] “Rumble” chords, and Robert singing his wonderful melodies.

So to answer your question, where did that unusual G chord come from? I didn’t have that chord when I started writing “Immigrant Song,” but it suddenly appeared while we were working together, putting a massive brake on this machine. That’s how I see the function of that chord.

GW I don’t think many typical rock players would come up with that.

PAGE No.

GW They wouldn’t really have that vocabulary…

PAGE …or perhaps the cheek or audacity of inserting that chord. It’s like, “Oh really? And what is that?” [laughs] Not only was it audacious, but it’s a chord that nobody could work out, which is even better.

Edited by FireOpal

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The fingering is in fact :

E:

B: 3

G: 3

D: 2

A: 3

E:

The name of the chord is actually C9 in case anyone is wondering.

That is what I said.

C9.jpg

I was starting from the C Note on the fifth string.

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but it’s a chord that nobody could work out, which is even better.

This is why I never try to work out Jimmy's parts on my own by ear. The man is a genius

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FireOpal, thanks for the info that it was actually from Guitar World November 2011. Online it didn't get posted until Dec. That link in the first post worked when I posted it. Guitar World must've removed it since then. Anyway, I'm sure I'll come across that issue one of these days.

Here's another location for just the article:

http://thefalconsnest.wordpress.com/tag/jimmy-page/

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No, it's not from the article.

I too have 'Vol 1', and the 3533 just sounds wrong. I checked this first, then went online to some tabs page.

As for 3233, this sounds closer than 3533, but I think the 2 adds too much dissonance compared with 3x33.

Maybe when JP launches his website, we can ask him? ;)

I think it might be like the Badd6 chord in the Blues anthem only one fret position higher but I dont know for sure either because Jimmy is the only one who can actually answerthe question perfect....so I throw that out there to see maybe or not ....nothing to lose ...so play our guitars like theres no tomorrow ....and keep bringin it......Jimmy Page could you please respond to this with a picture please .Thank you all very much

post-17535-0-02793000-1308216903_thumb.j

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I think it might be like the Badd6 chord in the Blues anthem only one fret position higher but I dont know for sure either because Jimmy is the only one who can actually answerthe question perfect....so I throw that out there to see maybe or not ....nothing to lose ...so play our guitars like theres no tomorrow ....and keep bringin it......Jimmy Page could you please respond to this with a picture please .Thank you all very much

Good luck with that man...lol!! I'd love (for all of us) to hear from Mr Page on this one but I don't think it's going to hapen. I alway's played it as a riff off of a BAR F chord. I admit I've not done a lot of research on the song so I don't know if it's right or not.

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Answering my own question here...

I've now seen the magazine with my own eyes. It's transcribed by Jimmy Brown as 31033X...which is exactly how DewieCox said he plays it. You win Dewie, walk hard indeed! As Page suggested, it's quite different from most of this thread's guesses and other sheet music book's transcriptions rooted in C (apparently because that's the note JPJ plays).

Of course, the interview was done by Brad Tolinski not Jimmy Brown so there's no way to know for sure that Brad got Page to show him the chord and Brad passed along that info correctly to transcriber Jimmy Brown, so this still might not be correct. But now we at least know what the magazine says (and apparently years ago GW transcribed it similarly but without the A-string note--as a straight forward Gminor). All we know for sure is that Jimmy referenced it as being a G chord. It was the interviewer that called it an astringent inversion.

Reviewing the thread for thoughts that were on the right track...

I'm not sure what you would call this chord, but it is some form of G considering that all three notes of the G-Minor Triad are present (G, B-flat, and D).

But... I do have the GW July '03 which tabs out the HTWWW version of Immigrant Song, and just to add to the confusion there is yet another different version of "that" chord for consideration:

E x

B 3

G 3

D 0

A x

E 3

On its own that's a straightforward Gm chord, but in this context - with the bass guitar definitely playing a C underneath - a C9 (no 3rd)

I play it like that, only I fret the Bb on the 1st fret of the a string as well.

BTW huw, that's verbatim how Jimmy Brown described it "C9 (no 3rd)".

Jimmy Brown has a Play the Best of Led Zeppelin lesson/backing tracks DVD that covers SIBLY, R&R, STH, & TSRTS.

Edited by selection7

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I think the album version is probably the C9 without the 3rd, played as described in the first response of this thread:

-x

-3

-3

-x

-3

-x

To my ears on the live version on the DvD he substitutes that chord for an E7#9 for the outro:

-x

-8

-7

-6

-7

-0

Edited by tdc

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I was thinking about this chord some more today, and I'm willing to bet, the chord we hear on the studio version is a c9 without the third, but not in any voicing we've tabbed out so far. I'm hypothesizing Page used an alternate tuned guitar to play that unique chord, why else would he substitute it when playing The Immigrant Song live?

Again I would suggest to any players to just use the E7#9 for the outro as this chord works great:

-x

-8

-7

-6

-7

-0

Its the same chord he uses all the time in such songs as - Were Gonna Groove, How Many More Times, and the Danmarks Radio version of Communication Breakdown etc.

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