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Found 137 results

  1. What is the best Led Zeppelin concert recording or bootleg?
  2. No Quarter live

    What are some of your favorite live versions of No Quarter? Some of my favorites are: 7/20/73 7/21/73 7/29/73 1/12/75 4/27/77 4/28/77 6/23/77
  3. Black Dog 2007

    I was listening to Celebration Day the other day, and I noticed that when they played Black Dog, my favourite track, there was no intro. It's always been Out On The Tiles (apart from when it was changed to Bring It On Home for The Song Remains The Same). Anyone know why it wasn't played?
  4. Tokyo 10-3-72 8mm Rare Footage

    Here you go... This will be new footage to most: http://www.ledzeppelin.com/video/tokyo-10-3-72-8mm-film
  5. Available at Newstands (Nearly) Everywhere

    Classic Rock April 2009 issue (UK)
  6. I don't post here very often but do read the contributions of other. Today I noticed a strange coincidence when I was looking at my Facebook feed and I don't remember the topic being mentioned or discussed here. The last Jimmy Page-era Yardbirds concert was July, 7th 1968 and the last Led Zeppelin concert with John Bonham was exactly 12 years later on July, 7th 1980. After some additional research it turns out that the last Jimmy Page and Robert Plant concert was July 7th, 2001. What is going on with July 7th and Jimmy Page?
  7. I assume most of you have seen 1975 NBC News report that popped up a while back featuring footage from Led Zeppelin's 1975 tour. Now making the rounds is yet another NBC News report...this one from August 1973. Ostensibly about the Payola scandal in the music industry, but really it is just another excuse for MOR America to look down their snooty noses at Led Zeppelin. I was a Walter Cronkite kid myself, so I missed this report when it originally aired...but it cracks me up how the oldtimers always called them 'THE Led Zeppelin'.
  8. Best Song

    After going on a Zeppelin listening spree, I thought about how different the sons were nd what other people like. My favourite acoustic song is Babe I'm Gonna Leave You and my favourite electric one is Immigrant Song. These are my favourites, what are yours?
  9. Lawsuit over Stairway to Heaven

    I just read about a new pending lawsuit over Stairway to Heaven, and wanted to give my opinion. It's not the first time LZ has been sued, and probably won't be the last. Here's a link to the article at Businessweek. Note 1: I didn't proofread, edit, or spellcheck this. This is the web, FTLOG. Let the errors go. Note 2: This is one man's opinion. There's a detailed story in Businessweek about the latest copyright infringement lawsuit against Led Zeppelin, one of my favorite bands. I've read most of the biographies and sagas about LZ, plus I have all their music and videos. With that level of interest, I've followed the lawsuits. The suits ask interesting questions of us: what is a "basic" sound that simply exists for anyone to create a variation of, what is a song that loosely inspired another, and when is borrowing considered copying (or stealing) under the law? I feel bad for judges and juries who have to sort these things out, because it's an example of human culture being shoved into a rectangular box, and it can't possibly fit. That's probably why most of these lawsuits are settled prior to an official ruling. These kinds of lawsuits exist in nearly all aspects of life: technology -- hardware and software, books and other writing, cars, etc. I once read that 99% of all cell phones sold in the world yield some of the profits to Microsoft because the company owns so many technology patents. Companies like Microsoft, Apple, Google, and countless others, often buy companies not for their products or services, but to acquire the patent portfolio. It's complicated and fascinating. The latest lawsuit against LZ involves Stairway to Heaven, which sounds a lot like a song called Taurus, by the band Spirit. Does that mean it's copyright infringement? Hard to say. Many people have tried to say LZ's song White Summer (sometimes called Black Mountainside or White Summer / Black Mountain Side) is theft of a Bert Jansch song. To make things more interesting, Jimmy Page started doing the song with The Yardbirds, before LZ was formed. Jansch is (was) a British folk guitarist and singer who did his own version of the song, which he called Black Waterside. Turns out, Jansch's song is similar to a song called Mustapha, by Davy Graham, which came out a couple of years before Jancsh released his own version. Jansh's song is also similar to Graham's guitar version of She Moved Through the Fair. Some say LZ should credit and pay Jansch and Graham. However, Black Mountainside is a British (or maybe Scottish, I can't remember) folk song dating back hundreds of years. This makes it fair game for anyone to use for inspiration, and is likely the reason LZ hasn't been sued over their version. Another area of creativity I've enjoyed, and one that intersects with Led Zeppelin, is fantasy novels -- although not for many years. There just isn't enough good fantasy out there to get fired up (with a few notable exceptions). Tolkien is, of course, the Founding Father, and has never been bettered. When I plowed through The Lord of the Rings as a kid, I thought it was the most creative thing anybody had ever produced. I found out it's not nearly as creative as I thought, starting with elves. Elves existed in popular culture in Celtic and Dark Age Britain, and probably most Celtic areas, at least a thousand years before Tolkien came along. They were thought to exist in a parallel universe, traveling back and forth between their own world and ours through known gateways. The Isle of Avalon in Arthurian mythology is the most famous of these gateways. Myrlin the magician, of Arthurian mythology, could travel freely between both worlds, and he is rendered as Gandalf in LOTR. The elven folklore was so powerful that England's first king, Alfred, is associated with elves. Alfred, btw, was spelled Aelfred at the time, with the A and E combined in the Old English ash character. Today's "alf" could just as easily have been rendered "elf". The name means, literally, "elf councillor". One had to be very important to give advice to the elves, as the people of the time believed, because the race was considered wise and mysterious. In LOTR, Frodo was formally named Elf Friend by the elves. It was a high honor, borrowed by Tolkien wholly from real folklore that existed for thousands of years. To this day, there is some debate about whether "Alfred" was the name of the king, or his title, or both. The way people thought in the 9th century was so different from our own, we may never know. My opinion is that if a royal family in 9th century Anglo-Saxon / Danish England named a second or third son, as Alfred was, A Councillor to Elves, they would have been viewed as incredibly arrogant. Others probably gave him the title, and it was assumed as his name. This was fairly common at the time -- choosing, or adopting a name chosen by others, after attaining a high office. Midieval kings did this as a matter of routine. This ancient history can be seen today in the way Popes change their name upon attaining the office. As for Tolkien, his major works were loosely designed to provide a creation myth for Great Britain, so they needed to feel like they originated in the Dark Ages or earlier -- hence the similarities to the folklore and literature of the period. If you read the Niebelungenlied (sp?) and the Kalevala (sp?) and Arthurian literature and some other Dark Age stories, you quickly discover that Tolkien is not nearly as creative as most people seem to believe. He had some novelties, and was a great writer, and crafted a heavyweight story on things that mostly existed earlier. He plagiarized nothing, yet invented little. His greatness was the story and the writing. Magic rings? Like elves, commonplace for the era, and not invented by Tolkien. Today we see an echo of this ancient history whenever a wedding ring is placed on a finger. Tolkien was influenced by many sources, and he in turn was a major influence on Robert Plant, the primary lyricist for Led Zeppelin. Many LZ songs contain references to LOTR. And, just like Tolkien's writings, many LZ songs can be traced back to older sources -- other rock songs or earlier blues songs, but that doesn't necessarily mean theft. If it was that easy, Robert Jordan would have been sued by Tolkien's estate for the Wheel of Time series of fantasy novels. Tennyson's estate, if it still existed, would sue both, except that copyrights expire after awhile. The descendants of Beowulf's author would sue everyone. Tolkien was, after all, an Anglo-Saxon (Old English) scholar and considered one of the best translators of Beowulf. A recent lawsuit was that of Dan Brown over his authorship of The Da Vinci Code. The authors of a non-fiction (although highly speculative) book called Holy Blood, Holy Grail sued Brown because, they said, Brown fictionalized their book. I don't believe Brown denied this, and after reading both of those books, I can say he would have been foolish to deny it -- they're nearly identical at the idea level. Brown won because, as the British court said, an idea can't be copyrighted. The main idea in both books is the Holy Grail, a powerful motif of Arthurian mythology, which greatly influenced Tolkien, who greatly influenced Robert Plant. This why I wrote this long-winded post -- so many parallels, so many connections, so much gray area, and occasionally a court of law has to sort out the meaning of it all and how the law applies. Ridiculous and fascinating. Oh, I also wrote this because I love LZ and Tolkien, and also because I believe law must exist, and because it's a mostly rational concept that deals with irrational human beings, it will never function well. So, what's the dividing line between an idea and an original work of creativity, protected by copyright laws? LZ will win the new lawsuit if they can demonstrate that the song Taurus had nothing to do with Stairway to Heaven or that Taurus was merely the idea that prompted an original work. The Businessweek article shines a light on this: "Ultimately, the legal test isn’t what experts say. Under U.S. law, the standard a jury or judge would apply is whether the song in question sounds like a copy to an ordinary lay listener." Tolkien's estate will never have to deal with these types of lawsuits because the copyright on Dark Age literature is long expired, and also because the exact authorship of many of the works is impossible to prove, but these are the only reasons. I've read most of the source material that influenced Tolkien, such as the Arthurian stuff, the Kalevala, the Norse sagas, the Niebelungenleid, Beowulf, the Anglo Saxon Chronicle, Taleisin, Aneirin, etc. I've also listened to most LZ music, as well as the source material. The parallels are uncanny. If LZ stole Taurus and re-worked it as Stairway to Heaven, then Tolkien stole Gandalf from Old Welsh writers. I don't hold it against Tolkien -- I don't consider him a thief -- and I don't consider LZ a thief over Taurus. The inspiration seems clear, but I think it stops well short of copyright infringement. I'd give you 10:1 the suit is settled out of court with a small monetary payout and a new credit appearing on future releases of Stairway to Heaven.
  10. Can anyone point me towards articles (both primary and secondary sources) that describe Led Zeppelin's influence on popular music? Although their influence is well known, it is not well documented and as such is hard to find evidence. (I'm doing a small research paper on them and their influence/effect on popular up until the 90s). Thanks!
  11. So, I had been wishing that Zeppelin would tour one last time so I could see them once, missed them as a kid and kicking myself for it. I figure they wouldn't be as good as they were 20 years ago, but still, cool. I have been keeping track of the back & forth between Plant & Page about reuniting and was frustrated by the outcome. HOWEVER, I have been listening to alot of Plant's later work and came up with a theory; Was Plant ever really into the harder, "metal" type hard rock? Most of the work he's done has been slower blues, folk, and nearly country music as with Alison Krauss. NOTE: I love this later work, so this isnt a slam on it! So, to you folks out there that know Plant better, what do you think? Thank you!
  12. Dogz of Zeus

    Hi guys, I wanted to introduce you to my band, based out of NYC. We are called Dogz of Zeus. Some of our material is more metal, but our rock and ballad stuff is very influenced by Led Zeppelin. I wanted to share a couple videos of one of our more mellow songs called The Circle to see if you guys can dig it:
  13. Do you guys think the o2 Kashmir was the best ever? Or was it the 1979 Knebworth?
  14. Sharing a little video teaser of The Violution's cover of "Stairway to Heaven" with only electric violin, bass and drums. Enjoy (FYI No guitars were used in the recording of this track.) www.theviolution.com
  15. Outrider opinions

    I personally like Outrider I think has more of Jimmy's hard rock and bluesy feel. Unlike some of Robert's later projects. (I enjoy Robert's solo career as well)
  16. UK Visit

    Hello all, I will be visiting the United Kingdom this May. I want to take advantage of the trip and find places to visit that have significance in relation to Led Zeppelin. Whether it be venues they have played, places they have lived, or museums. Please let me know!
  17. John Bonhams Drumming Explained Rather a heady title I admit. I don’t think anyone can fully explain him. However I have been playing the drums for roughly 38 years, and I started out wanting to be like him at the age of 5. (And Ringo). So I thought some of you might want some insight from a drummer who has studied a master. Because after all, to become a master one must study a master. This could well be a 100 page essay, but in the interest of brevity I have selected a few songs hopefully everyone has access to, and noted time marks where applicable to illustrate my examples. John Bonham could play with feel, a deep enveloping feel. He was a drummer where “feel” came first, time second. Whereas, in the case of Neil Peart for example, time is first, feel is second. Bonzo also had the amazing quality of being powerful, yet nimble. He also had swing, as is evident in Candy Store Rock, Kashmir, Out On The Tiles, just to name a few. It is easy to see his jazz/swing influences such as Buddy Rich, Gene Krupa, and Joe Morello. In fact John Bonham borrowed a lot of of Joe Morello’s triplet ideas. Dazed and Confused Of course the most noticeable God like quality of his drumming was his speed. He could bend time. The good drummers can do this, our brains can move in nanoseconds, calculating what you just played, what you are playing, and what you are going to play all at once. The best example of John’s speed is the end of Dazed and Confused (from The Song Remains The Same). There have been fierce debates as to whether it is has been sped up, but I can assure it has not. The hand is quicker than the eye. I also know because I can play it. Same song now, different example: Note at the 11:59 mark how Jimmy Page lets Jonesy and Bonzo take over in this rhythmic interlude. This is a great example of how fast and tight the rhythm section was, and how important it was to the success of the band. Trampled Under Foot Here is another example of the blistering speed at which he could play. And maintain throughout a 10 minute song. At the 4:36 mark we get a glimpse of John’s concentration, he is definitely “in the zone”, and as you can see, sweating and working very hard. Moby Dick/Over The Top Another great glimpse into the happiness and concentration on John’s face occurs at 4:56, 5:20, and 6:04. One of things I believe that made Zeppelin great was the happiness in their music. The Song Remains The Same The happiest and most swinging Zeppelin song, in my opinion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=he6TQsU8d6k John has an interesting approach to this song where alternates the lead beat of the bar between the snare drum and the bass drum. Just another example of his jazz feel, and his attention to detail. When The Levee Breaks Some more interesting attention to detail here at the 1:35 mark. At one time I thought this was tape noise, but I’m convinced it’s John making the sound of water bursting through a small hole. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEKkJHSO8A0 Of course this is also one of the best known songs for capturing his drum sound. Although there were some interesting recording techniques used, the sound still came from the drummer. He played the first note on his bass drum with an accent (hitting it harder) then silencing his drum head with his bass drum mallet before striking the second note just after. Simple yet genius. Here is a great example of his speed and nimbleness around the kit at 5:16, and his incredible foot speed at 5:26 We can also witness the sheer speed of his wrists with his machine gun drum rolls at 6:48. In closing I want to say happy birthday to the most intelligent, powerful, soulful, nimble, quickest, passionate and and talented rock drummer of all time.
  18. Now that the remastered "Houses of the Holy" has been released, here is where you can post your feelings, good or bad, about the reissue. This goes for whether you only got the remastered original album, or if you got the Deluxe Vinyl package or if you went whole hog and got the Super Deluxe Editions. Or even if you just got the HD downloads. Whatever format you got this remastered "Houses of the Holy", give us your review. How does it sound to you as compared to the original vinyl or the old cds? Do you like the packaging? Were there any flaws or screw-ups in your opinion? What sounds better? What sounds worse?
  19. The upcoming release of The Complete BBC Sessions got me thinking. In 2007 Jimmy rereleases The Song Remains the Same with previously unreleased tracks like Over the Hills and Far Away (although the rerelease was still missing the organ solo / Thank You of which the organ solo is ??). Then in 2014-2015 he rereleases all the studio albums with never before heard outtakes and mixes (of which my favorite would definitely have to be 10 Ribs & All Carrot Pod Pod (Pod) from the companion disc for Presence). Now it's 2016 and Jimmy is rereleasing BBC Sessions with a companion disc. Do you see the pattern? I think we're finally going to get to hear the missing tracks from How the West was Won in good quality. The Communication Breakdown from June 25th, 1972 is my personal favorite version. I don't know if any of you guys noticed but sometime around 1970 Jimmy started playing the chorus part of Communication Breakdown a little differently. The part when Robert goes "communication breakdown, it's always the same, I'm having a nervous breakdown drive me insane" in the studio version and in all the live versions on the Led Zeppelin DVD and all the live versions on BBC Sessions (except for the sample song from the new BBC Sessions companion disc that you can buy on iTunes right now) he plays the guitar part the normal way which is basically bar chord on the fifth alternating pinky on the ninth then bar chord on the seventh alternating pinky on the eleventh (see the Led Zeppelin Mothership tab book for a more detailed description). But on other live versions for example on the June 25th, 1972 and the blueberry hill version and the earl's court 1975 version the chorus part gets changed to something I haven't entirely figured out how to play yet. Anyways, I predict that How the West was Won is going to get rereleased sometime within the decade and we're going to finally get to hear good quality versions of the missing songs like Tangerine, Communication Breakdown, Louie Louie (I'm most excited about this one), and Thank You. What do you guys think? Will How the West was Won get a rerelease with the missing songs?
  20. Here's my new video: LED ZEPPELIN's entire DISCOGRAPHY covered in 6 minutes on drums! Hope you like it! ?
  21. Following the latest Led Zeppelin news this year for the upcoming release of "The Complete BBC Sessions" on September 16.Please post interviews regarding this here.
  22. http://ultimateclassicrock.com/led-zeppelin-legal-fees/
  23. Hi everybody! i'm a huge fan of led zeppelin. I live in rome and i think that this new tribute band is very great! Tell me waht you think about! cheers
  24. Hypothetical: If you could only have one CD of Led Zeppelin what would you put on it? Can be from studio, live, 2014-15 outtakes, bootlegs, etc, whatever you want. No caveats. (Also a CD can fit 80 min of music).
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