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Swede

60's Garage Rock, Nuggets, Pebbles & Back From The Grave

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I believe there are a few others, besides me, who's into the 60's garage rock punk scene, or proto-punk, or whatever you want to call it.

Some of the more known bands are The Sonics, Standells, The Seeds, Shadows of Knight and The Music Machine.

The Sonics

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In the late 70's when punk got popular, a lot of different compilations were released under the the names Nuggets, Pebbles, Highs In The Mid 60's, and Back From The Grave. Some of them still being re-released on vinyl and cd.

I highly recomend the first ten volumes of the Pebbles compilations, or the Nuggets 4 CD Box set. Anyone who's into bands like Yardbirds, Kinks, Them, Stones and the later punk rock bands should appreciate this stuff.

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Edited by Swede

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Link was great, absolutely, I love his stuff. I've got a great compilation with his early recordings.

There are also a lot of obscure rock-a-billy artists which recorded songs in very primitive ways that got, what we call today, punk-ish sound. I love Johnny Burnette Rock'n'roll Trio, they're version of Train Kept-a-Rollin' is cool, especially the guitar sound! And let's not forget about Bunker Hill! He sounds like a Little Richard on acid, as if Little Richard isn't rough around the edges enough. :D

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Speaking of the grindy/grungy sound....I have some Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys stuff and the guitarist in the 30s had a 'broken speaker' sound on some tunes.....inadvertant distortion and PUNK !! Hahaha...even some of the 1920s blues artists had the 'pawn shop' amps...

...and some of the early T Bone Walker and Hubert Sumlin had that "too broke to replace the speaker" sound also....I don't think they really wanted it that way...but it may have even influenced Link and those late 50s rockabilly grungers....

I like how Link actually poked holes in his speakers to attain that sound...

LOL, no they were certainly not very happy about that kind of sound back in the '20's-'40's, but it must've done something good since, as you mentioned, Link poked holes in his speakers so that he could get the sound he wanted. The Sonics did the same with their speakers. :D

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The Sandals and The Ventures.

The Ventures were huge in Sweden. My dad liked them, and I've purchased alot of their records. They were one of the first bands to use the fuzz pedal.

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^ I prefer the Sandals, but that's only because I never wear any.

Well, I wouldn't know, I've never heard The Sandals (and I never wear any).

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^ After reading your list of songs in the "musical tracks that change my life"-topic, I know who the Sandals are, I've heard The Endless Summer Theme, but that's about it though..

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The CD that accompanies the December 2007 issue of Mojo (the Mothership-style red-and-black issue with Plant, Page and Jones on the cover) is a compilation called Heavy Nuggets: 15 Lost British Hard Rock Gems 1968-1973. The CD art design is modeled after Mothership.

Anyway, the CD is relevant to this thread because of its contents. There's at least one overlap between this disc and the Nuggets 2 box set on Rhino: the amazing track "Magic Potion" by the Open Mind. There's some great "Good Times Bad Times"-esque bass drum footwork throughout that track, although I suspect the Open Mind's drummer was probably using a dual bass pedal setup unlike John Bonham.

The CD also includes tracks by:

- Terry Reid, who turned down the offer to sing for Led Zeppelin but recommended Robert Plant instead

- the Pretty Things, who were signed to Swan Song Records

- the Atomic Rooster, which included drummer Carl Palmer, who'll be at Led Zeppelin's reunion concert next month

- the Move, who were supposed to play on the same Fillmore East bill as Led Zeppelin on 1/31/69 and 2/1/69 but scrapped their tour dates because of a sudden lineup change

- Slade, which included a few Led Zeppelin enthusiasts

- Procol Harum -- come on, we all know Procol Harum

- and several others

All in all, I vouch for this CD being really great! Recommended for all. Sold only with the magazine with Plant, Page and Jones on the cover. Not a bad purchase!

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The CD that accompanies the December 2007 issue of Mojo (the Mothership-style red-and-black issue with Plant, Page and Jones on the cover) is a compilation called Heavy Nuggets: 15 Lost British Hard Rock Gems 1968-1973. The CD art design is modeled after Mothership.

Anyway, the CD is relevant to this thread because of its contents. There's at least one overlap between this disc and the Nuggets 2 box set on Rhino: the amazing track "Magic Potion" by the Open Mind. There's some great "Good Times Bad Times"-esque bass drum footwork throughout that track, although I suspect the Open Mind's drummer was probably using a dual bass pedal setup unlike John Bonham.

I often enjoy the MOJO Magazine CD's!

The Open Mind was great, I love Magic Potion and Cast A Spell, two great singles!!

I highly recomend their one and only album too. It's more or less impossible to find the original LP, but it's been re-released on CD and include the four songs from their singles as well.

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AMG review

As a defining point of the U.K. psychedelic/progressive rock crossover, the Open Mind's sole album is the perfect specimen. With a singing style rooted in the freakbeat era, rather than the operatic tenor screams hard rock ushered in, and acidic duel guitars, heavier than those of a typical psychedelic act, The Open Mind filled the gap between the beginning of one era and the end of another. "Magic Potion" is unarguably their greatest moment. Its monotonous rhythm guitar anticipates the stoner rock of Hawkind while double bass drum fills and doom-laden fuzz guitar ragas combine bombastic rock power with Eastern-influenced psychedelia. Magnificent! "Girl, I'm So Alone" — a remake of early Open Mind lineup, mod band the Drag Set's "Get out of My Way" — harks back to a 1967 feel, as do a number of other songs that show the band being not quite as progressive as they intended. However, both the heavier and mod styles work well, but where they fall down is on some rather laborious numbers that just don't take off. Unfortunately, "Magic Potion" is the benchmark that everything they wrote is compared to, and when a song is that good, nothing else measures up. Still, as a whole, this album is a solid product of the time. It might not merit the "classic" status dealers apply to it, but it won't disappoint either.

by Jon 'Mojo' Mills

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Joelmon, thanks for the tip, I highly enjoy checking out surf/instrumental bands. Lot's of the neo garage bands from the 80's is cool.

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lets not forget my favorites... the MC5!!! I just got some new live material on vacation...

album_miniatura_184949886.jpg sorry for the small pic

a small collection of tracks from the Grande Ballroom from 1968... that has a great version of Black to Comm... and some John Lee Hooker, long, blues style jams with I'm mad like Eldridge Cleaver and Ice Pick Slim... both brilliant!!!

album_miniatura_173347777.jpg again, sorry for the small pic... all i could find

and then there is live from Saginaw Civic Centre (Jan 1st, 1970)... that has some "newer" songs of theris like Human Being Lawnmower, Tonight, Teenage Lust and Shakin' Street... plus a great melody of Starship/Kick Out the Jams/Black to Comm/Teenage Lust...

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and then I got "Motor City is Burning"... its a bootleg... but its got some rarer stuff like Revolutionary Blues and Looking at You... the sound on this one is kinda flat... but you can hear their energy

Edited by zosodude13

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I'm a big fan of rockabilly, surf and some garage (old and new) stuff. Rhino has done a magnificent job over the years of releasing some great box sets in this very vein. I just hate I never snatched up the Cowabunga! surf collection before it went out of print. The Children of Nuggets box has long been on my ever growing and expanding Most Wanted List. I also love Southern Culture on the Skids who combine surf, country, rockabilly, rock, garage, etc. and put on a very kickass live show involving fried chicken, nanner puddin' and on occasion, watermelon.

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Southern Culture on the Skids

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I'm a big fan of rockabilly, surf and some garage (old and new) stuff. Rhino has done a magnificent job over the years of releasing some great box sets in this very vein. I just hate I never snatched up the Cowabunga! surf collection before it went out of print. The Children of Nuggets box has long been on my ever growing and expanding Most Wanted List. I also love Southern Culture on the Skids who combine surf, country, rockabilly, rock, garage, etc. and put on a very kickass live show involving fried chicken, nanner puddin' and on occasion, watermelon.

I LOVE Rockabilly and Garage rock! Been a huge fan for years. Surf I like to a certain extent. I don't have the Cowabunga collection either but I remember it coming out. Mojo magazine had a good garage rock compilation in one of their magazines.

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I LOVE Rockabilly and Garage rock! Been a huge fan for years. Surf I like to a certain extent. I don't have the Cowabunga collection either but I remember it coming out. Mojo magazine had a good garage rock compilation in one of their magazines.

I haven't been real fond of the recent XM/Sirius merger, mainly because, as an XM subscriber I was a big X Country devotee (which was replaced by the vastly inferior Outlaw Country channel) but I do love Little Steven's Underground Garage. It doesn't always stick to what I've come to know as "garage rock" (they recently played Be My Lover by Alice Cooper, a song I love but I can't say I've ever thought of it as "garage rock") but it's a great channel. I understand about Surf as it does get a bit repetitious at times but when I get a hankering for it (particularly during these cold ass winter months) nothing hits the spot like a good surf instrumental. If I had known the Cowbunga surf collection was a limited pressing I would have purchased it long ago but I had no idea. There's used copies available but they're well out of my price range. Thanks to some friends, I've been able to obtain most of those same songs from a couple of other Rhino single disc Surf collections (which are also now out of print). For some newer surf stuff, I highly recommend the album Savvy Show Stoppers by Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet.

Shadowy-SavvyShow.jpg

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I haven't been real fond of the recent XM/Sirius merger, mainly because, as an XM subscriber I was a big X Country devotee (which was replaced by the vastly inferior Outlaw Country channel) but I do love Little Steven's Underground Garage. It doesn't always stick to what I've come to know as "garage rock" (they recently played Be My Lover by Alice Cooper, a song I love but I can't say I've ever thought of it as "garage rock") but it's a great channel. I understand about Surf as it does get a bit repetitious at times but when I get a hankering for it (particularly during these cold ass winter months) nothing hits the spot like a good surf instrumental. If I had known the Cowbunga surf collection was a limited pressing I would have purchased it long ago but I had no idea. There's used copies available but they're well out of my price range. Thanks to some friends, I've been able to obtain most of those same songs from a couple of other Rhino single disc Surf collections (which are also now out of print). For some newer surf stuff, I highly recommend the album Savvy Show Stoppers by Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet.

Shadowy-SavvyShow.jpg

Little Steven's show is actually aired on a local rock station so I'm able to hear it when I remember to tune it in. I have a couple of surf compilations and yes, on a cold winter's night they are good to listen to! Oh sure, I know Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet. An ex of mine had that record.

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Wow, I haven't seen this thread in a while. I can only agree with you Jahfin, regarding the Rhino box-sets. They've made a great job. Unfortunatly I don't own ANY of them myself, which is kinda strange as I'm a huge fan of garage, surf & rockabilly. I do have much of the stuff on vinyl, but the box-sets are cool with the booklets and all.

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I LOVE Rockabilly and Garage rock! Been a huge fan for years. Surf I like to a certain extent. I don't have the Cowabunga collection either but I remember it coming out. Mojo magazine had a good garage rock compilation in one of their magazines.

Me too. And i'm fortunate enough to have experienced one of the best garage rock era's growing up in southeast michigan in the 60's. Some you may have heard of, like ? and the Mysterians, the Rationals, Bob Segar and the Lost Herd and others like the Bossmen, who had Dick Wagner of the Frost and later Lou Reed and Alice Cooper, and the Pack, with Mark Farner and Don Brewer that never made it much past the state line.

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Me too. And i'm fortunate enough to have experienced one of the best garage rock era's growing up in southeast michigan in the 60's. Some you may have heard of, like ? and the Mysterians, the Rationals, Bob Segar and the Lost Herd and others like the Bossmen, who had Dick Wagner of the Frost and later Lou Reed and Alice Cooper, and the Pack, with Mark Farner and Don Brewer that never made it much past the state line.

Some of those I've definitely heard beyond the obvious!

As an aside - Swede Rhino has done a bang up job over the years of compilations. I've yet to see one they've done that's a clunker. Razor and Tie is another label that's also done a lot of great comps.

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Me too. And i'm fortunate enough to have experienced one of the best garage rock era's growing up in southeast michigan in the 60's. Some you may have heard of, like ? and the Mysterians, the Rationals, Bob Segar and the Lost Herd and others like the Bossmen, who had Dick Wagner of the Frost and later Lou Reed and Alice Cooper, and the Pack, with Mark Farner and Don Brewer that never made it much past the state line.

I'm jealous... I had to grow up in a "slightly-less awesome" 1980's south-east Michigan.

Great groups though.

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Had to bump this thread.

Two weeks ago I heard that The Pretty Things were playing at Le Beat Bespoke in London. I was in London but unfortunatly I hadn't the time to visit the weekender and therefore missed an opportunity to see one of Britains best 60's r'n'b acts. However, they may perform the entire SF Sorrow album in Edinburgh later this spring so in that case I'll do whatever it takes to go watch them. I have hear a lot of great things about their resent performaces.

Another British old 60's act that still is on the road is the great Downliner's Sect. If you ever get the chance of seeing them, don't miss it!! These guys are heavily into old Bo Diddley and other blues stuff, but of course, they turn it to their own style as most of the 60's r'n'b bands used to do.

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I believe there are a few others, besides me, who's into the 60's garage rock punk scene, or proto-punk, or whatever you want to call it.

Some of the more known bands are The Sonics, Standells, The Seeds, Shadows of Knight and The Music Machine.

The Sonics

Sonics6.JPG

In the late 70's when punk got popular, a lot of different compilations were released under the the names Nuggets, Pebbles, Highs In The Mid 60's, and Back From The Grave. Some of them still being re-released on vinyl and cd.

I highly recomend the first ten volumes of the Pebbles compilations, or the Nuggets 4 CD Box set. Anyone who's into bands like Yardbirds, Kinks, Them, Stones and the later punk rock bands should appreciate this stuff.

111608218.jpg

68528686.jpg

BackFromTheGrave1.jpg

1617378.jpg

How's it going "Swede?" When I think of 60's Garage Rock, I think of THE KINGSMEN'S 1963 immortal classic hit entitled "Louie Louie!" I LOVE THAT SONG! I better go "Swede," its time for me to get back to work. I have a 12 hour day in store for me today. In the mean time, live life to the fullest and ROCK ON!

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Hey ZFF, Kingsmen were great indeed and definitely pass for one of the great garage bands of the 60's.

BTW, I have to give you heads up for this great r'n'b tune:

The band's name is BEAT MERCHANTS (great name too!!) and they came from Sussex, England. They were formed in 1962 and released only two singles. The first single was a great double sider released in '64, though it's the A-side that steals most of the attention. The bass and the wailing harmonica is ridiculously great and once the song starts off you will have trouble not tapping your feet to the beat!!

Me and a friend were invited to do a couple of radio shows a few years ago. One of the programs were about the British r'n'b scene in the sixties. We picked a couple of songs and spoke about the music and the bands. One of the songs were this one.

Hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

THE BEAT MERCHANTS

beatmerchants.jpg

Edited by Swede

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Hey ZFF, Kingsmen were great indeed and definitely pass for one of the great garage bands of the 60's.

BTW, I have to give you heads up for this great r'n'b tune:

The band's name is BEAT MERCHANTS (great name too!!) and they came from Sussex, England. They were formed in 1962 and released only two singles. The first single was a great double sider released in '64, though it's the A-side that steals most of the attention. The bass and the wailing harmonica is ridiculously great and once the song starts off you will have trouble not tapping your feet to the beat!!

Me and a friend were invited to do a couple of radio shows a few years ago. One of the programs were about the British r'n'b scene in the sixties. We picked a couple of songs and spoke about the music and the bands. One of the songs were this one.

Hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

THE BEAT MERCHANTS

beatmerchants.jpg

How's it going 'Swede?" THE BEAT MERCHANTS, I'm going to have to do some research on this band. I've heard of them but I haven't listened to them in years. Thanks for waking a brain cell up in my head. I still say that you should write a thread on ABBA. ABBA'S accomplishments in the music world during the 1970's cannot be denied. What better person to write a great tribute thread on ABBA than a fellow countryman such as yourself "Swede." The impact of ABBA'S popularity worldwide in the 1970's was massive. Like myself, every horny guy was in love with the 2 female members. They were beautiful. ROCK ON!

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