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SteveAJones

The Rest in Peace Thread

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Rest In Peace Jesse. He never wavered. Neither did his Father.

yes, Jesse snr held a piece of metallic looking substance that he says was as thin as cigarette paper, yet really strong, and that he had never seen anything like it before or since. he said he believed it was not from this earth ....

i believe him.

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RIP Seamus Heaney. I was going to post this, but you beat me to it Drop Down.

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RIP Seamus Heaney. I was going to post this, but you beat me to it Drop Down.

PP,

I'm especially upset because I had the chance to meet him last March but I wound up not going, thinking, I'll wait for the next time.

There is no next time. Carpe diem :-(

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Heavy hearts for metal's oldest fan


Britain’s oldest rocker Owen Brown has died at the age of 87.

The farm worker took his love of heavy metal bands like Judas Priest and Iron Maiden to the grave. In latter years he listened in the comfort of his Herefordshire home rather than spend hours at a time in his garden shed. But he never lost his love for ear-shattering, heavy rock music made by groups such as American band Megadeth. Indeed, his family have chosen the Megadeth song Skin Of My Teeth for the final procession out of Weobley church at his funeral on Tuesday.

Owen was born in the small. remote country village of Ivington, just outside Leominster. His father worked on the roads, but at the age of 14 Owen went to work on one of the many hop farms that dominated the Herefordshire countryside. While working on the farm he met his widow Maria and they had been married 65 years at the time of his death.

He leaves three daughters, Margaret, Ann, Jenny and two sons, Neil and Michael, known as Pedro. None of them know exactly how Owen picked up his musical tastes.

Several years ago Owen told the Western Daily Press: ‘‘I was about 23 when I first started listening to music and surprisingly it was Cliff Richard who got me listening. Then I moved on to Elvis and I never looked back.

“I lived in a house with no electricity in the Sixties but made sure I had a battery-powered stereo.”

His musical taste hardened with time and during his twilight years he would spend four hours at a time down in the shed with a cup of tea, his slippers and heavy metal on the speakers.

Owen himself said at the time: ‘‘It’s great because I can play it as loud as I want in there. I can sit back with a drink and listen to Megadeth with no worries in the world.

‘‘When all the kids were at home they would often ask me to stop playing it or turn it down but it’s only worth listening to at full blast.”

Son Pedro, 61, said: “My dad was a little country chap with a hat and little check shirt full of holes.

“He worked on a farm all his life but he was very different to all the other farm workers. Nobody else liked music like my dad. He worked on the land all his life and he was a very gentle man, except for his music.” Michael says when the children were young they thought it was normal for dads to listen to blaring rock music in their sheds. But as they grew older friends used to shake their heads in disbelief when he told them who was making all the noise and it was the children and grandchildren who used to complain and tell him to turn it down. “When I used to say ‘it’s my dad’ they could hardly believe it,” said Pedro. “I used to think everybody’s dad was the same until I got to 18 and realised how special he was. Music was his lifelong passion. He started with rock ‘n roll on the old wind-up gramophone, moved on to 60s bands like Cream, the Doors and Eric Clapton and just kept getting heavier and heavier. He used to listen to music in the hop kilns. He was quite amazing really.”

When asked about why he liked rock, Owen himself said: “Rock has a great exciting rhythm that other music doesn’t have. Most people grow out of it but I just never did and still listen to rock as much as possible and will probably listen to it for the rest of my life now.”

When the WDP told how he blasted out mega-riffs by Metallica, Deep Purple, Iron Maiden and Judas Priest on his 26-year-old record player, Owen became an overnight celebrity in the world of heavy rock. Groups such as Black Sabbath and Def Leppard started sending him merchandise and he was invited to his first concert to see Megadeth. He was interviewed by TV companies from the UK and abroad, but when fans started inviting him on stage at conventions, and festivals he decided enough was enough and retreated back to his shed and his music. After his wife became ill, Owen sold his record player and swapped his collection of vinyl LPs for CDs which he played indoors.

Long-suffering wife Maria would leave the room when he played his loud rock music but never told him to turn it off.

Owen had been living with cancer for around five years when he died, but was only ill in the last three months.

“Because he wasn't well he’d often be up in the night listening to a programme called Planet Rock,” said Pedro. “He’d be there at 2am listening to really loud rock music. His hearing was fine, he just liked it loud.” Owen died in the hospital on August 15 and leaves 15 grandchildren and 21 great grandchildren.

His funeral will be at noon on Tuesday and he will be taken into the church to John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers song, A Hard Road.

But his family are determined he will leave to his favourite heavy rock band, Megadeth. Pedro, a drummer with aspiring Cajun band Whiskey River, is the only one of his children likely to carry on the musical legacy, but not for heavy rock.

“My father has inspired me all my life, and not just with his music. I live in an old telephone exchange where I can play my music uninterrupted but I prefer jazz. When I was choosing music for his funeral I had to listen to all his tracks and now I understand a little more about why he liked it. It’s good driving music.”

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RIP Tom Clancy

One of my favorite modern authors. I loved his books. RIP Mr. Clancy.

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One of my favorite modern authors. I loved his books. RIP Mr. Clancy.

Indeed...the man could tell a fuckin' story that sucked you right in. Sure, some of his books got a little lengthy, but, like with Stephen King, some of those longer stories you just couldn't tell in 300 pages.

Command Authority, what will obviously be the last Jack Ryan novel now, comes out in December.

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Command Authority, what will obviously be the last Jack Ryan novel now, comes out in December.

Not based on any Clancy novel,unfortunately.

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RIP U.S. character actor, Ed Lauter.

Veteran character actor Ed Lauter, whose long, angular face and stern bearing made him an instantly recognizable figure in scores of movies and TV shows during a career that stretched across five decades, died Wednesday. He was 74.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2465032/Actor-Ed-Lauter-known-menacing-character-roles-dies-aged-74-losing-battle-cancer.html#ixzz2i0WtYyDu

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RIP U.S. character actor, Ed Lauter.

Veteran character actor Ed Lauter, whose long, angular face and stern bearing made him an instantly recognizable figure in scores of movies and TV shows during a career that stretched across five decades, died Wednesday. He was 74.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2465032/Actor-Ed-Lauter-known-menacing-character-roles-dies-aged-74-losing-battle-cancer.html#ixzz2i0WtYyDu

"game ball" - RIP

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Comedian Felix Dexter dies of cancer

_70579057_bbc.jpg

Dexter was born in St Kitts and moved to the UK when he was seven

Friends have paid tribute to Felix Dexter, who died on Friday.

The comedian and actor had suffered from myeloma, a type of bone marrow cancer. Reports said he was 52.

Colleagues and peers used Twitter to praise the St Kitts-born Londoner, with comedian David Baddiel mourning a "real loss to comedy".

He came to prominence in the flagship black comedy The Real McCoy and later performed for a season with the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Fellow comedian Sean Hughes wrote on Twitter: "So so sad to hear about the truly wonderful Felix Dexter passing away.

"I hope you can feel the love in the comedy community fella. Rip."

Bill Bailey wrote: "Very sad news about my old friend Felix Dexter. A brilliant comedian, a superb comic actor, a lovely man I feel privileged to have known."

'Talented, articulate performer'

Once named Time Out comedian of the year, Dexter also featured in iconic BBC comedies The Fast Show and Absolutely Fabulous.

More recently, he played three of the main roles in BBC Two's sketch show Bellamy's People and is currently appearing in Citizen Khan.

His close friend, BBC Radio London presenter Eddie Nestor - who acted alongside Dexter for three years in The Real McCoy - told BBC Radio 5 Live: "It's a sad day. It's a really sad day. I went to see him and we talked and we laughed, and we laughed really hard.

"This is somebody who's been diagnosed with a terminal illness and you find yourself laughing really hard, belly laughs."

He added: "We've lost a talented, intelligent, articulate performer who could touch - who could reach out."

The Fast Show's Paul Whitehouse acted with Dexter in Bellamy's People.

Whitehouse told BBC Radio 5 live he was privileged to be close to the comedian and actor.

"He was a very modest, a very private man," he said.

"It was an honour to be close to him.

"He stuck in people's minds, Felix. There's been such an outpouring of warmth and affection for him."

Before entering comedy, Dexter studied law - something he said helped him deal with hecklers.

He named Billy Connolly and the late American comics Richard Pryor and Bill Hicks among his influences, and remained on the stand-up circuit throughout his career.

Later he featured in long-running staples Have I Got News For You and Grumpy Old Men, as well as the influential Knowing Me Knowing You with Alan Partridge.

As an actor, he had parts in Casualty and the Bill and appeared in the West End alongside Christian Slater.

_70579201_mccoy.jpgHe first came to prominence in The Real McCoy

What are your memories of Felix Dexter? Please leave your thoughts using the form below.

I knew Felix in the old days, when I was on the stand up circuit myself. He was very funny and friendly. I became an event producer and he was one of my headliners. He was one of the pioneers of black comedy - the Real McCoy should be re-shown as a tribute to his work. He will be truly missed.

Avril Nanton, Enfield, Middlesex

When The Real McCoy was aired on our TVs, Felix Dexter, in my opinion, was the one comedian that stood out. I could not wait to see his contribution to the show. He played a variety of roles, that had you in stitches. I will truly miss him, he was an icon.

Gary, London

I used to look forward to Felix Dexter on Down the Line, he was was my favourite voices on that show and I always wanted to hear as much as possible of him.

Matthew, Colchester

I met him a few times when I worked in Covent Garden. He was an aspiring performer then. He was unaffected, graceful and certainly articulate. He had no edge to him and was easy to talk to and laugh with. We saw many "stars" in the store and they should have taken a leaf out of his book. This was over 25 years ago so he must have done something right.

Sergio Pani, London

I was very fortunate to have Felix appear in two of my shows. He was a real gentleman and so funny! Felix was brilliant at including the audience in his routine. He really will be missed in the world of comedy!

Diane Thompson, London

I met Felix Dexter a few times at UCL, where I studied from 1971 to 1974. I remember him as an astute observer of characters and mannerisms. I wasn't surprised at many of the things he did in sketches on television, that was the man I remembered him.

Alan Griffiths, Forest Gate, London

We have truly lost one of the UK's greatest comedic talents. He was, and will always remain a staple diet of fun and laughter amongst my family and children, who loved and followed everything he did. A truly lovely man, he will be sorely be missed, but was greatly loved and will always be remembered with a smile and wonderful memories.

Pauline Miller, UK

He had a nobility about him, very funny man, I saw him in the hospital and still he had time to joke with me , a quiet man with dignity. As good a character comic as any.

Simon Day, London

My daughter and I laughed and laughed at Felix's Julius Olefemwe character in the TV version of Bellamy's People. "Calm down" was so funny as were his other appearances as "posh husband with silly wife" . We thought he was a very funny actor and comedian. Such a loss and so sad.

Patti, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire

I met Felix in 1987 when I worked with his Mum Doreen, when he was working the circuits before he became well known. He was a lovely, kind and very funny person. I kept in contact with him and his mum after I left the job and he always remembered me and got me tickets to see him when he performed. He was a brilliant actor in the RSC productions and in One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest. He had no airs or graces and would always meet with me for a drink afterwards.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-24591754

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RIP Gloria Lynne
Jazz singer Gloria Lynne dies
Oct. 20, 2013, 1:54 PM EST

WENN

Jazz star Gloria Lynne has passed away just weeks before her 84rd birthday.

The singer died after suffering a heart attack at Columbus Rehabilitation Center in Newark, N.J., on Tuesday.

She was set to celebrate her birthday on November 23.

Born in Harlem, New York to a gospel singing mother, Lynne won the Apollo Theater's amateur concert aged 15, before finding national fame in the U.S. by appearing on Harry Belafonte 's "Strolling '20s" TV special in the 1960s.

She joined her peers Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles and Johnny Mathis on the country's jazz club scene and secured hits with ballads including "I Wish You Love" and "I'm Glad There Is You."

Lynne continued performing throughout her life, giving her last show in August at New York's 54 Below venue.

Edited by pottedplant

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