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Ross62

Interviews with Jimmy Page,2014.

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GQ is not music magazine. Journalist's job is to ask questions, not to fawn over interviewee. Don't pretend that Page's drug use isn't interesting topic from journalist's point of view. There are 100 ways to politely deny answering questions like that. Being overly polite have better effect than being sulky.

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GQ is not music magazine. Journalist's job is to ask questions, not to fawn over interviewee. Don't pretend that Page's drug use isn't interesting topic from journalist's point of view. There are 100 ways to politely deny answering questions like that. Being overly polite have better effect than being sulky.

It's Jimmy Page's life. Not yours. Page can be as polite or impolite as he wants when talking about himself.

Edited by Chicago

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It's Jimmy Page's life. Not yours. Page can be as polite or impolite as he wants when talking about himself.

If he's going to agree to an interview with a lifestyle mag and answer questions in such a way that the article gets titled "Grouses of the Holy," fine, but readers and fans have every right to react to his attitude, as Gabrielle and several others (including me) have, without someone trying to shut down discussion with the rationale of "he can act however he wants." Such is the life of a public figure -- having your words and actions analyzed by others.

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I'm joining the discussion. Dont expect an individual, even a public one, to be someone they're not. Jimmy Page has never gone in depth about his drug use. What's changed?

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I'm joining the discussion. Dont expect an individual, even a public one, to be someone they're not. Jimmy Page has never gone in depth about his drug use. What's changed?

I think most people who have posted are disappointed in his sulky, put-upon attitude throughout the interview and in his outright denial of what is incredibly obvious rather than his decision not to talk in depth about his drug use, which I don't think anyone expects. Subtle difference.

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Page has given several surly interviews in the past. Incessant questions about drug use usually lead to a bad exchange. Its a familiar pattern which wont change.

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I think most people who have posted are disappointed in his sulky, put-upon attitude throughout the interview and in his outright denial of what is incredibly obvious rather than his decision not to talk in depth about his drug use, which I don't think anyone expects. Subtle difference.

His attitude was understandable given the line of questions. Not everybody feels they should have to broadcast every controversial moment of their life. The interviewer approached sensitive subjects like HEROIN addiction with very little tact. He deserved the cold shoulder if you ask me.

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There are certain topics that journalists in the "know" stay away from asking Jimmy, at least not in depth anyway.

These are:

1. His drug use.

2. Lori M.

3. His Occult beliefs.

4. Former wives.

5. Why Scarlett is "Scarlett".

6. Robert Plant's solo career.

Topics that are "Jimmy" friendly and can be asked at will are:

1. Led Zeppelin

2. The Yardbirds

3. Led Zeppelin albums

4. ABC Trust.

5. Favorite musicians.

6. Led Zeppelin concerts. (Tampa 1977 is always interesting.)

7. His new photo biography.

8. Future re-mastering plans.

9. Future photo albums.

Journalists take note: Don't tread where Angels fear to go!

-

Edited by nirvana

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Why Scarlett is "Scarlett".

Explain the issue here please?

Scarlet his daughter is not spelled that way . Nor is the Crowley "scarlet woman" if that's what you're alluding to. Her middle name Lilith has similar occult associations. And Scarlett, double t ,can only be accidental/serendipitous....

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Explain the issue here please?

Scarlet his daughter is not spelled that way . Nor is the Crowley "scarlet woman" if that's what you're alluding to. Her middle name Lilith has similar occult associations. And Scarlett, double t ,can only be accidental/serendipitous....

It's all very creepy indeed!!

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Possibly it's because drugs & alcohol have cost him just about every significant relationship he's had in some form or another and he's living in a state of considerable denial? (Whilst he says he won't condone the use of drugs, he certainly hasn't ever really admitted that it caused him any damage or was a mistake in any shape or form, which is interesting in itself - just about everyone else who had similar problems in that period has admitted that they wished they'd never gone down that route. The first step and addict usually takes to recovery is admitting that they have a problem. It seems to me that Jimmy has somehow managed to bypass this stage).

His drug use and it's consequences deeply compromised his working & personal relationship with Plant during the latter stages of Zep, and since.

It deeply compromised his playing (and, arguably, his creativity) - at least one reason why nothing live post '75 has been officially released - and his health.

His split with Charlotte Martin was at the most desperate stage of his addictions ('82-'83) - surely not a coincidence.

I don't think it's just because of his young kids that he finally kicked the booze in about 2000-ish - it certainly didn't seem to bother him that much with his first two kids. I think Robert Plant probably made it pretty clear that Jimmy's continuing alcoholism (and possibly more) was a big sticking point in their continued working relationship (along with playing a mostly Zep set in huge stadiums, which he'd clearly had enough of), so he finally cleaned himself up totally in the grim hope that he could re-kindle that again. And now (supposition) he's a little bitter because he feels that despite the perceived sacrifices he's made, Robert still won't come back and let him relive the best times in his life. Little wonder Robert doesn't want to get on the merry-go-round again.

I agree. It's also pretty impressive that he kicked alcohol and heroin without rehab but I suspect he would have gone to some form of therapy. He could've even have gone to rehab and just be denying it like the other things he said didn't happen.

Has Robert ever said the reason he halted the Page/ Plant tour was because of Jimmy's drinking? did they not get on on that tour? Didn't he say he slapped him in '96 before going on stage due to Jimmy being drunk?

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Who knows. Page and Charlotte might be huge Gone With The Wind fans.. It is nobody's business why they named their daughter Scarlet...with one or two t's

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I love the "Gone With The Wind" and "Frankly my dear...I don't give a Damn!" regarding Scarlett O'Hara....so cool!

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Crass translation ... Q: Tell me Jimmy ... Should Robert and John Paul have received production credit for In Through The Out Door instead of you because you were too smacked out???? A: Shove it! You smug arrogant shithead.. The interview was doomed.. I say Good for Page..Why should he have to answer for things that happened 35 years ago? It's ridiculous...

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^^ I agree with you Chase. That was really uncalled for, considering how the interview had gone off the rails by that point. However, Jimmy has gone on the record talking about his drug use in the past. I can recall several quotes of his speaking freely about it, but never mentioning any specifics or any relation to heroin. I believe he regrets how severe drug usage really hurt the chemistry in the band and within the band's organization. I also believe, privately, he does carry some burden for how heroin robbed him of his technique and his creativity along with his health and good looks...something he clearly prized before he became a junkie. It's certainly his right to his own privacy not to discuss these feelings with anyone, but as a fan, I do believe he has to carry some sort of regret with him. I love him for what he's given all of us but I've always felt Jimmy Page fell short of what he could have given us post-1975. And I believe that has been something he's never quite forgiven himself for.

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What I do love is when Jimmy gets into the details of the production process, his ideas about how to execute technically what he hears or sees in his head. You can tell it's dear to him and it's fascinating to get a glimpse behind the curtain to see creativity being shaped and transformed then and now. The difference in technology today compared to what they had to work with back in the day is staggering. Still, it comes down to the people who have ideas and tech know-how to bring it to life just so.

Nobody else could recreate that sound either (one of the reasons why I don't like cover bands). I mean, but for a few exceptions, Stairway at KCH being one, when anyone else played a Zep tune, even note for note, it just wasn't the same. That magical alchemy of where the four of them intersected was clearly missing.

He speaks of this process in an almost synesthetic way. It's hard to describe, I suppose, all the ingredients, be they physical or ethereal, that brought that sound into being. And bring it to life they did. Jimmy was able to capture all the dimensions and dynamics of it for us to enjoy. More about any and all of that is a treat to read about.

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... Jimmy can choose not too but if he does it's more endearing and likeable in my opinion. For example it was always fascinating to hear Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis talk about their childhood, struggling experiences and how they channeled it into their music. There was a vulnerability and warmth that made you connect. Jimmy doesn't go there at all in recent years (and if he did in the past it was the odd passing comment about how things were difficult when Bonham died etc..)

and it can leave him appearing cold and distant. Again it's my opinion. ..

I'm just going to throw this out there...maybe Page doesn't care about being endearing or likable. Some people don't. Miles Davis and Ritchie Blackmore come to mind. Both men had impressive careers despite their lack of "people skills". Btw, did anyone else notice that Page verified what some posters have wondered? His mother is still living. He's very fortunate to have had his mother with him for 70 years. Most people aren't that blessed.

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^^ I agree with you Chase. That was really uncalled for, considering how the interview had gone off the rails by that point. However, Jimmy has gone on the record talking about his drug use in the past. I can recall several quotes of his speaking freely about it, but never mentioning any specifics or any relation to heroin. I believe he regrets how severe drug usage really hurt the chemistry in the band and within the band's organization. I also believe, privately, he does carry some burden for how heroin robbed him of his technique and his creativity along with his health and good looks...something he clearly prized before he became a junkie. It's certainly his right to his own privacy not to discuss these feelings with anyone, but as a fan, I do believe he has to carry some sort of regret with him. I love him for what he's given all of us but I've always felt Jimmy Page fell short of what he could have given us post-1975. And I believe that has been something he's never quite forgiven himself for.

:goodpost:

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For me the interviewer became antagonistic. I don't think I would've answered his questions either. And it makes me wonder what's even the point of all this press. Some press, okay I can see that, but is this too much press?

At one point when being asked about drug use I like Page's suggestion that he could've been asked, what the climate was at the time, meaning the climate in the 70s. This suggestion by Page seems like a more general question that would be interesting to hear Page's perspective on. As we know the 60s/70s were a fascinating time in history that Page has first-hand knowledge of from the interesting perspective of being a professional, world touring musician.

Page gave a straightforward and I thought informative answer to the question about the hermit in TSRTS.

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Nobody else could recreate that sound either (one of the reasons why I don't like cover bands). I mean, but for a few exceptions, Stairway at KCH being one, when anyone else played a Zep tune, even note for note, it just wasn't the same. That magical alchemy of where the four of them intersected was clearly missing.

He speaks of this process in an almost synesthetic way. It's hard to describe, I suppose, all the ingredients, be they physical or ethereal, that brought that sound into being. And bring it to life they did. Jimmy was able to capture all the dimensions and dynamics of it for us to enjoy. More about any and all of that is a treat to read about.

The fifth element! :)

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Good posts by Elixir and woz70.

The fifth element! :)

Yes, that's it exactly! Hard to capture and channel it, but when you do, everyone can feel it.

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This was actually a worthwhile interview for all that Page stonewalled Klosterman. Klosterman did his research beforehand. He knew going into this interview that all of Zeppelin's members operate under a code of silence that would do the Mafia proud. He was bang on with his comment that Page is "unknowable". Here we have a celebrity who has been a public figure since he was in his early twenties and there are still numerous facts about his very public career we don't know. In the age of Facebook, Twitter and camera phones no less. This doesn't happen unless the celebrity wants it that way. Page revealed as much by refusing to give details about parts of his past that are public knowledge to anyone who knows anything at all about Led Zeppelin.

Still, I think I understand Page's viewpoint. If everyone knows he had a problem with drugs then why ask him about it? Ditto for any conflict between he and Robert Plant. The only reason journalists ask him these questions is because they want to hear the gory details then share them with their readers. Why should he slice himself open for their amusement? Personally, I think it takes courage to publicly admit to your weaknesses and failures. However, I also have a perverse admiration for Page's refusal to kowtow to our current confessional culture.

Edited by Disco Duck

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