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The Rover

FULL MOON

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Native Americans named the full moon of February THE FULL SNOW MOON. Some called it Full Hunger Moon, even Famine Moon, especially when winter was harsh and hunting halted.

The Cherokee named it FULL BONY MOON.

Celts called February's moon-- Moon of Ice.

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July's Full Hay Moon 7/25/10 over Wildomar as seen through my backyard telescope.

fullmoonoverwildomar72510.jpg

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Full-Moon-2006-04-13_23-13-RAINER-LPOD.jpg

The old moon looks like the road signs that have all been shot to hell.

B)

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Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21

The last lunar eclipse of 2010 is especially well placed for observers throughout North America. The eclipse occurs at the Moon's descending node in eastern Taurus, four days before perigee.

The Moon's orbital trajectory takes it through the northern half of Earth's umbral shadow. Although the eclipse is not central, the total phase still lasts 72 minutes. The Moon's path through Earth's shadows as well as a map illustrating worldwide visibility of the event are shown in Figure 4. The timings of the major eclipse phases are listed below.

Penumbral Eclipse Begins: 05:29:17 UT

Partial Eclipse Begins: 06:32:37 UT

Total Eclipse Begins: 07:40:47 UT

Greatest Eclipse: 08:16:57 UT

Total Eclipse Ends: 08:53:08 UT

Partial Eclipse Ends: 10:01:20 UT

Penumbral Eclipse Ends: 11:04:31 UT

At the instant of greatest eclipse (08:17 UT) the Moon lies near the zenith for observers in southern California and Baja Mexico. At this time, the umbral magnitude peaks at 1.2561 as the Moon's southern limb passes 2.8 arc-minutes north of the shadow's central axis. In contrast, the Moon's northern limb lies 8.1 arc-minutes from the northern edge of the umbra and 34.6 arc-minutes from the shadow center. Thus, the southern half of the Moon will appear much darker than the northern half because it lies deeper in the umbra. Since the Moon samples a large range of umbral depths during totality, its appearance will change dramatically with time. It is not possible to predict the exact brightness distribution in the umbra, so observers are encouraged to estimate the Danjon value at different times during totality (see Danjon Scale of Lunar Eclipse Brightness). Note that it may also be necessary to assign different Danjon values to different portions of the Moon (i.e., north vs. south).

During totality, the winter constellations are well placed for viewing so a number of bright stars can be used for magnitude comparisons. Pollux (mv = +1.16) is 25° east of the eclipsed Moon, while Betelgeuse (mv = +0.45) is 16° to the south, Aldebaran (mv = +0.87) is 20° to the west, and Capella (mv = +0.08) is 24° to the north.

The entire event is visible from North America and western South America. Observers along South America's east coast miss the late stages of the eclipse because they occur after moonset. Likewise much of Europe and Africa experience moonset while the eclipse is in progress. Only northern Scandinavians can catch the entire event from Europe. For observers in eastern Asia the Moon rises in eclipse. None of the eclipse is visible from south and east Africa, the Middle East or South Asia.

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Looking up, high in the sky, just after Midnight, the Full Moon was very impressive tonight.

Full-Moon-2006-04-13_23-13-RAINER-LPOD.jpg

Oi Rover,

I own an acre of that, I cant remember where though but you have no right to show everybody where I store my Stash, third Crater up from the River of Urea that flows from the Misty Mountains in to the Ocean of Jammy Cream Cakes, 53 degrees north of the Equator and 0 Degrees Greenwich Mean Time, and I do mean MEAN TIME. :wtf:

Regards, Danny

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THE WOLVES WILL BE HOWLING LONG....................................:)

Nothin' else to do I guess.

iwatwos.jpg

B)

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Cool flick to watch on a dark, snowy Dec. nite :):):)

Yep, it scared the crap out of me as a kid. :o

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Awesome Moonrise tonight ! !

BIGDAN, you should have hid your stash on the dark side of the Moon, as we have done so for time memorial.

Will be looking up around 2am this Tuesday Morning.

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Big snow storm here so we will miss the eclipse.

Happy solstice!

We have a lot of cloud cover with the storms here in CA, but you can probably find web sites that will be showing the eclipse. I may find one if I can stay up late enough.

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We have a lot of cloud cover with the storms here in CA, but you can probably find web sites that will be showing the eclipse. I may find one if I can stay up late enough.

It's 9:34 PM up here and with the haze the moon looks like you're seeing it through a cataract. :(

Maybe it'll change by the time the eclipse comes.

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It's now 11PM and there's actually a break in the clouds and it's coming through. :)

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I got a few pictures with my 10x zoom camera and my tripod.

The moon was red/orange when I got them. It was too flipping cold to stay out much longer than the time it took me to get the pictures that I got, so I didn't get more than one stage.

Whatever the result, I'm happy with them. They're better than most people got. ;)

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I got a few pictures with my 10x zoom camera and my tripod.

The moon was red/orange when I got them. It was too flipping cold to stay out much longer than the time it took me to get the pictures that I got, so I didn't get more than one stage.

Whatever the result, I'm happy with them. They're better than most people got. ;)

Then please share them with us Madders. :)

Kind Regards, Danny

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I saw the lunar eclipse before and after the moon was in the earth's shadow.

With the naked eye and binoculars, the gradual darkening of the moon was greatly more impressive to view, than the moon actually darkened.

So, the funnest part for me, was before the moon was fully eclipsed !

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Tomarrow the full moon will be 14% larger and brighter than usual due to it being the closest to the Earth . Apparantly it's called a "super perigee moon" Be sure to take a look, weather permitting.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson says this is not a big deal, and the equivalent of a 7-inch pizza becoming an 8-inch pizza. He's an astrophysicist, so I'm going with him.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson says this is not a big deal, and the equivalent of a 7-inch pizza becoming an 8-inch pizza. He's an astrophysicist, so I'm going with him.

Where are you going?

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