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Barney Hoskyns book

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How is it? It's such a distressing time, how do you know what what was going on in the member's minds at the time?

I said that it's "easy to judge" -- not that it's "proper" to.

Hoskyn's book is a fascinating read but, one problem I'm having with it is the lack of context to many of the quotes. As a result, many of them raise more questions than they answer.

This perplexes me. What "lack of context"?

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Hoskyn's book is a fascinating read but, one problem I'm having with it is the lack of context to many of the quotes. As a result, many of them raise more questions than they answer.

I can understand your point. I think Hoskyns tries very hard to tell a narrative through the selected interviews and one has to hope he is being sincere in doing so based on his past work and reputation.

I think it comes down to what version of Led Zeppelin do you want to hear and/or know: the glossed over, mythical, Viking god version; the immensely talented yet increasingly flawed, drugged-out, narcissistic bastards version or somewhere in between. There's nothing wrong with questioning any of these versions but I would caution those who completely buy into one or another without considering the elements of truth that lie in all of them.

Edited by zeppy668

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I said that it's "easy to judge" -- not that it's "proper" to.

This perplexes me. What "lack of context"?

I think Zeppy668 stated it best. Hoskyns relied upon the interviews to tell the story with little narration on his part. It's a clever device in many ways because we get to hear from people who actually worked for or partied with Page, Plant, Jones, Grant and Cole recall their experiences with them in their own words. However, the drawback for me is that Hoskyns didn't include HIS questions that prompted their recollections. I respect that he didn't want to interject himself into the book. And the end notes at the back do give us the interviews' sources and dates. However, without Hoskyns' questions and comments to the interviewees, I feel that I'm not getting the full story; or at least as much of the full story as the interviewees felt comfortable sharing.

I will add that Hoskyn's book is superior to anything else about Led Zeppelin that I have read so far.

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I will add that Hoskyn's book is superior to anything else about Led Zeppelin that I have read so far.

If it is better than Mick Wall's book then i will be impressed! My copy should arrive from Amazon anyday now - can't wait!

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It is a good book,but I think dave lewis could write the ultimate led zeppelin biography. on the funeral,i do not know whether or not jones and page even went to bonzo's funeral.i know page and plant went to grants,not sure about jones.

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If it is better than Mick Wall's book then i will be impressed! My copy should arrive from Amazon anyday now - can't wait!

Peter Grant-the man who led zeppelin is a lot better! hammer of the gods,and Richard cole's book are just as good to an extent! cole obviously stretched the truth,but he was actually there which is more you can say about most of the other guys who wrote books! if you want to read a better account of the bill graham/led zeppelin encounter in Oakland in 1977,read bill graham's book,there is a whole chapter on it,including plant's side of it!

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It is a good book,but I think dave lewis could write the ultimate led zeppelin biography. on the funeral,i do not know whether or not jones and page even went to bonzo's funeral.i know page and plant went to grants,not sure about jones.

All three surviving members attended Bonham's funeral in early October 1980.

Jones did not present to Karac's funeral as he had been traveling in Oregon with his family for a time following the Oakland June 24th 1977 performance.

It is thought Page did not present to Karac's funeral as he was unwilling to travel through customs at the time in order to fly back to England, out of concern for recently secured "cargo".

It is perhaps unwise to offer criticizing opinions, or any opinions for that matter, on a sensitive event that took place over 35 years ago, and especially so when one apparently knows little of the circumstances regarding the pertinent time period.

Edited by ListenToThis

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Peter Grant-the man who led zeppelin is a lot better! hammer of the gods,and Richard cole's book are just as good to an extent! cole obviously stretched the truth,but he was actually there which is more you can say about most of the other guys who wrote books! if you want to read a better account of the bill graham/led zeppelin encounter in Oakland in 1977,read bill graham's book,there is a whole chapter on it,including plant's side of it!

Thanks for the leads, will check them out! Dave Lewis would write a superb biography but i don't know if he would sugar coat the nitty gritty stuff!

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Jones did not present to Karac's funeral as he had been traveling in Oregon with his family for a time following the Oakland June 24th 1977 performance.

It is thought Page did not present to Karac's funeral as he was unwilling to travel through customs at the time in order to fly back to England, out of concern for recently secured "cargo".

It is perhaps unwise to offer criticizing opinions, or any opinions for that matter, on a sensitive event that took place over 35 years ago, and especially so when one apparently knows little of the circumstances regarding the pertinent time period.

yeah,if I recall correctly,he was out in a Winnebago and did not find out until the day after the funeral. page did have a bad smack habit then,so I understand why he did not go! and you are right,none of us know what was going on,so we should leave it be.

LEDZEPEDEE-lot of great stories about zeppelin from old magazines like circus you could find on line too.you should also try books a million,they sell used books down right cheap!

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yeah,if I recall correctly,he was out in a Winnebago and did not find out until the day after the funeral.

If the next gig was scheduled for 30th, I suspect he must have known before the funeral, unless he turned up for the gig on his own.

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Suffice to say that all the members of the band (and entourage) were aware of the situation.

Suffice to say that some of those members chose to not attend.

Suffice to say that the band at that point was not in the best place -- either physically or mentally -- and inter-band relationships were not terrific.

Suffice to say that with the passing of time, if you asked said members if they regret their decisions back in 1977, the answer would be yes.

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I think Zeppy668 stated it best. Hoskyns relied upon the interviews to tell the story with little narration on his part. It's a clever device in many ways because we get to hear from people who actually worked for or partied with Page, Plant, Jones, Grant and Cole recall their experiences with them in their own words. However, the drawback for me is that Hoskyns didn't include HIS questions that prompted their recollections. I respect that he didn't want to interject himself into the book. And the end notes at the back do give us the interviews' sources and dates. However, without Hoskyns' questions and comments to the interviewees, I feel that I'm not getting the full story; or at least as much of the full story as the interviewees felt comfortable sharing.

I will add that Hoskyn's book is superior to anything else about Led Zeppelin that I have read so far.

Okay, so it lacks a bit of a narrative voice -- but the quotes themselves provide "context." He pairs quotes to be in conversation with one another.

Peter Grant-the man who led zeppelin is a lot better! hammer of the gods,and Richard cole's book are just as good to an extent! cole obviously stretched the truth,but he was actually there which is more you can say about most of the other guys who wrote books!

...This book is composed of people's firsthand accounts. Much better as an overall picture of the group, their allies and enemies than any other, bar none.

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Sooo...I have been reading all your reviews and comments,now I am split,should I get it or not??

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clw: If you want a fairly well-rounded picture of the band, I'd say so. If you're looking for the music...you might want to seek other books.

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Thanks,I just ordered it!!!

clw: If you want a fairly well-rounded picture of the band, I'd say so. If you're looking for the music...you might want to seek other books.

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Sooo...I have been reading all your reviews and comments,now I am split,should I get it or not??

In my opinion it is a great read clw.....I LOVED IT!....Let us know what you think of it too...ciao Fishy

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will do,ordered it from barnes and Noble

In my opinion it is a great read clw.....I LOVED IT!....Let us know what you think of it too...ciao Fishy

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Sooo...I have been reading all your reviews and comments,now I am split,should I get it or not??

Oh, it's definitely worth reading in my opinion. Among other things, it goes into a fair amount of detail about the business side of the band. I found that fascinating reading because I knew very little about how the music business operated. If you want the dish about the band it's got that too, though this isn't the book's focus. I found it helpful to skim through the end notes for each chapter after reading it to find out when the interviewee talked to Hoskyns.

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thanks!!

Oh, it's definitely worth reading in my opinion. Among other things, it goes into a fair amount of detail about the business side of the band. I found that fascinating reading because I knew very little about how the music business operated. If you want the dish about the band it's got that too, though this isn't the book's focus. I found it helpful to skim through the end notes for each chapter after reading it to find out when the interviewee talked to Hoskyns.

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clw,

I am pleased you ordered it. It is definitely a worthwhile LZ book, unlike so many others. I bought it on the first day of publication in the UK and stayed up all night to read it! A lot I didn't know from other sources, such as the important role of Steve Weiss in the band's business side, and the story behind the O2 rehearsals etc. Even the gossip bits are good.

Sooo...I have been reading all your reviews and comments,now I am split,should I get it or not??

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I think my favourite quote from the book is this one:

I only got into heroin because I thought it could make me more creative. That was a big mistake.


Pagey, from page 269. Ostensibly from Hoskyn's 2003 interview with him. I've never seen/heard him be so candid. That is the reason to own this book -- the frankness portrayed within.

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I think my favourite quote from the book is this one:

Pagey, from page 269. Ostensibly from Hoskyn's 2003 interview with him. I've never seen/heard him be so candid. That is the reason to own this book -- the frankness portrayed within.

WTF???? Page said that??? I have never known him admit to making a mistake about anything especially his drug use - ever!

I lost some respect for him for that quote when he said he did'nt regret the drugs as he was always focussed when he needed to be (no he was'nt!). Talk about a man in denial!

Interesting!

Could never understand why someone as intelligent as him could get into smack, i mean it was'nt as if he came from the ghetto or anything! And when has heroin ever made anyone creative????

Al least he can admit it now - been a long time coming!

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WTF???? Page said that??? I have never known him admit to making a mistake about anything especially his drug use - ever!

I lost some respect for him for that quote when he said he did'nt regret the drugs as he was always focussed when he needed to be (no he was'nt!). Talk about a man in denial!

Interesting!

Could never understand why someone as intelligent as him could get into smack, i mean it was'nt as if he came from the ghetto or anything! And when has heroin ever made anyone creative????

Al least he can admit it now - been a long time coming!

I've never lost any respect for him -- frankly, he was able to focus better than others who were addicts, although to claim that it didn't negatively effect him...

The source for the quote isn't listed in the back, so one has to assume (as I do) that it came from Hoskyns' 2003 interview with Page. Really, I think Page know the reality...he just wishes that interviewers wouldn't focus on the negative -- notice how he always perks up when they come to him asking about the music, and how he clams up when all they want to talk about are mudsharks and drugs? It's because those things weren't Zeppelin -- they were part and parcel, but Zeppelin was the music, which, again, the lack of is my only complaint about the book in question.

EDIT: I just realized I've been misspelling Barney Hoskyns' name. Whoops!

Edited by Melcórë

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I've never lost any respect for him -- frankly, he was able to focus better than others who were addicts, although to claim that it didn't negatively effect him...

I just thought it was an opportunity to renounce drug use bearing in mind it cost him his drive, creativity, his looks and ultimately the band he created. A bit of humility was called for instead of no regrets IMO.

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WTF???? Page said that??? I have never known him admit to making a mistake about anything especially his drug use - ever!

I lost some respect for him for that quote when he said he did'nt regret the drugs as he was always focussed when he needed to be (no he was'nt!). Talk about a man in denial!

Interesting!

Could never understand why someone as intelligent as him could get into smack, i mean it was'nt as if he came from the ghetto or anything! And when has heroin ever made anyone creative????

Al least he can admit it now - been a long time coming!

Lots of smart, creative people got into smack. Miles David, Pete Townshend and Eric Clapton to name a few. Smarts and common sense don't always go hand-in-hand. Also, it's important to remember that Page (along with Townshend and Clapton) came of age in Swinging London. It was a time and place of changing social mores and lots of experimentation.

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