Jump to content

Jimmy Page 1963 TV interview


Recommended Posts

Thanks for identifying the interviewer as being Royston Ellis. Jimmy of course did and does know him. In fact, one of his very first On this Days is about him.

I was amazed also with the quality. It was gorgeous on the level on theatrical film quality. I loved that he wanted to be an artist and how he holding the pen and the tablet. Thanks so much again for sharing this with us.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What a fantastic find - great quality! Jimmy reveals more in this interview than he does in any of his recent ones.

Thanks DRD and special thanks to Dawn for making the find. Goes to show there is still material in archives everywhere waiting to be discovered.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, first post,

I hope you may find this interesting. It's an early June 1963 TV interview with Jimmy that's recently been rediscovered.

In it he says that he sees music as a way of funding his art. Mission accomplished, I think.

Here's the link:

http://vimeo.com/105653705

Cheers,

DRD

Thank you so very very very much, DRD!! :yourock: Also, thank you for joining this forum in the first place! What took you so long?! ;) Always fantastic to see such rare footage of Jimmy! WOW!! Love the cheeky and confident vibe Jimmy is giving off, in that interview! He sure does looks like a kid of the 50's! Also, so glad he pursued his interest in the electric guitar instead! B)

Edited by Kiwi_Zep_Fan87
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is many shades of awesome! Where this takes me, is that if Page does another solo album, he should have the cover be one of his own works of art. Do the illustration himself, weird lettering, all of it. I would really like to see some of his art work/painting. I wonder if the coloured clouds on the cover of the 2nd Zeppelin album were his work. Its my favourite of all their album artwork, its like how a kid sees things, those clouds.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is absolute delicious, what a gem. Thank you so much! It´s interesting how Jimmy speaks about working with the big names, asserting that is "disappointing". Never meet your idols maybe, James? I enjoyed seeing there the impudence of a young man, how lovely and long forgotten, and still he is indecisive about which professional path he should take. Fortunately for all of us, he made the right decision. Perhaps the brightest side of being a rockstar -instead of a tormented in isolation plastic artist, or a dull pottery master- helped him.

Oh, and the cute accent :angel: Very middle-class, a fresh, tidy and clean young man.

This made my day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is absolute delicious, what a gem. Thank you so much! It´s interesting how Jimmy speaks about working with the big names, asserting that is "disappointing". Never meet your idols maybe, James? I enjoyed seeing there the impudence of a young man, how lovely and long forgotten, and still he is indecisive about which professional path he should take. Fortunately for all of us, he made the right decision. Perhaps the brightest side of being a rockstar -instead of a tormented in isolation plastic artist, or a dull pottery master- helped him.

Oh, and the cute accent :angel: Very middle-class, a fresh, tidy and clean young man.

This made my day.

Meh, he needs to trim the back of his neck lol.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great find, great interview. This is fascinating on several levels, and may even re-write Jimmy's history to a certain extent:

- he refers to himself as a session guitarist as if it's already become his full-time job (but the common story is that Jimmy didn't become a full-time session man until late 1963).

- he says he's been doing sessions for 18 months, which would correspond to December 1961 (almost a year before the Jet Harris "Diamonds" session).

- he indicates that he still plays with Neil Christian (by most accounts, he left that band in 1962).

I noticed this as well. Some of Royston Ellis' comments contradict the Led Zeppelin Party Line version of Page's early career. Of course, Ellis was discussing events that happened over 50 years ago so his memory could be faulty. Page comes across as an ambitious young man on the make in this interview. Nothing wrong with that.

Edited by Disco Duck
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much! It´s interesting how Jimmy speaks about working with the big names, asserting that is "disappointing". Never meet your idols maybe, James?...

This. It could explain some of Page's later reticence. He learned at an early age that one's idols often have feet of clay when encountered in real life. I'm reminded of the famous Abraham Lincoln quote: "It is better to keep one's mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Well well, look at Jimmy all confident in that youthful, urban, artsy way. So fresh faced and so many paths before him at the time. Very interesting to see it in hindsight. I echo the gratitude to you, DRD, for sharing, and to Dawn for finding it. Great film quality, too.

As someone also mentioned, I'm struck by the differences in physicality, identity and expression between Jimmy and Robert at around the same age. Also, Robert's path for musical expression was set early on, even if it took him to unexpected places over the years. For Jimmy, on the other hand, it seems like art was leading the head-to-head with music. I'm curious if he has some art work in the vaults...

Finally, very telling how quick and decisive his response of, "Disappointing" was when asked about working with some big names. So forthright. A young gunslinger who quickly assessed the scene.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Thanks for identifying the interviewer as being Royston Ellis. Jimmy of course did and does know him. In fact, one of his very first On this Days is about him.

I was amazed also with the quality. It was gorgeous on the level on theatrical film quality. I loved that he wanted to be an artist and how he holding the pen and the tablet. Thanks so much again for sharing this with us.

From: Feb. 2015...

Page by Page

By chance, on my birthday, I caught a glimpse of me 52 years ago on Channel 4 TV news in England, which showed a clip of a “brutally honest” interview I did with Jimmy Page in 1963. Go to: http://www.channel4.com/news/led-zeppelin-guitar-jimmy-page-autobiography-music-video

.... Forum Link was sent to RoyElliston.Com same day video appeared by myself Sept. 9, 2014...Very Fortunate to see Jimmy acknowledging the priceless charming video...

Link to post
Share on other sites

...As for the content - where to start ?

He seems very prepped for the interview: quick fire questions with equally quick fire answers.. and among the answers, he's claiming he's only played for four years! That ignores the Huw Wheldon performance... though of course other of his comments about when exactly he picked up a guitar have tended to vagueness...

Page had worked with Royston Ellis on and off for three years by the time this interview took place. This maybe why he seemed so confident; he knew and trusted the interviewer. Also, he wasn't famous yet so being interviewed for television was still a novelty.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...