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SteveAJones

Clapton is God: The Eric Clapton Thread

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Never mind the quality, feel the width.

If you're suggesting contemporary Eric Clapton performances are of inferior quality I can only disagree.

Hong Kong (February 18th 2011)

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If you're suggesting contemporary Eric Clapton performances are of inferior quality I can only disagree.

No, that's not what I meant. I'm sure EC's playing just as well as he was in the 70s, if not better.

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No, that's not what I meant. I'm sure EC's playing just as well as he was in the 70s, if not better.

Oh, I see. He's admitted he must nap nowadays when he's got a gig to do that night, but still seems in fine form to me. The older I get the more I listen to and enjoy EC!

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This is obviously my own opinion, but I would have to say that Jimmy Page is more of a GOD than Eric Clapton. This is my reasoning for saying that............................

Eric Clapton was the first white guitarist who took the blues and ran with it to (at that time) unheard of levels. Steve Van Zandt from Springsteen's band said Clapton was the 'binary code' for all rock players and the music they make. Clapton was the first, it's undisputable. Page was a session musician during this time, little else.

To bring Jimmy Page into any kind of comparison (or Jeff Beck or anybody else really) is absurd. Clapton was the first guy, before anybody else. Was he the best ever? No I don't personally think so but I don't think that's the reason for this thread I don't think.

The kids in London spray painted "Clapton is God" back then. They must have thought so at the time, don't you think? Find one of them who's still alive and well and ask them why they did this.

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Clapton Is God - Why?

By Kevin Charles Scott

The famous graffiti proclamation "Clapton is God" first appeared at the Islington underground station in 1967. Today, although recognized as one of the great guitar players of the modern era he would hardly be considered the best, let alone attributed "God" status. So why did the 60's music fans so idolize Eric Clapton?In 1965, then popular guitarist with the up and coming group "The Yardbirds" Eric Clapton joined John Mayall and recorded the Bluesbreakers album. His contribution was immediately recognized as being way in advance of any other guitarist up to that time (Jimi Hendrix and the release of "Hey Joe" were still over a year way) his Freddie and Albert King inspired playing was a revelation and established Clapton's name as the best blues guitarist on the club circuit.

Today, it is difficult to connect with the standards of that era. The most popular British guitarist for many years had been Hank Marvin of the Shadows whose style belonged to a previous, more sedate, safer era. The Stones; Kinks and Animals had all moved towards a more Chuck Berry inspired guitar style but in no group did the guitar dominate. The Bluesbreakers album not only featured Clapton front and centre but included two guitar instrumentals "Steppin Out" and "Hideaway" that were far more energetic; and complex than anything recorded before. Clapton used tones, and sustain that could only be achieved by playing at great volume. There was no precedent; Eric Clapton may as well have arrived from Mars!

By 1966 Clapton had formed "Cream" which provided the perfect platform to showcase his long sustained blues solos and build on his reputation. Cream took conventional blues and interpreted it in a new free form way allowing total expression of the musicians, and heralded a new arty, psychedelic pop trend in popular music. By exporting the sound to the USA before any imitators could master the new techniques, his fame became international.

Soon there would be many imitators, and also a very real, unique alternative in Jimi Hendrix. As is always the case, die hard fans will stick by there heroes especially those that have such a dramatic effect on their lives. In a demonstration of that allegiance the graffiti in Islington appeared.

Has Clapton stood the test of time? Well although the passage of time and the advent of many brilliant guitarists since have lessened our opinion of his playing skills, we should remember that it was he that first perfected the style of Freddie and Albert King and developed it into a new guitar language. Furthermore, his influence is undoubtedly greater than any other electric guitarist, not only in Blues but also Country Rock; Rock and Reggae. His version of "I Shot the Sheriff" introduced reggae to a mass market.

He is a recipient of seventeen Grammy Awards, and is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004 Clapton was awarded a CBE for services to music.

Yes, I believe he has earned the title.

Whether or not you agree with my view of the historical significance of Eric Clapton I am sure we can agree that he is one of the most important guitarists of the modern era.

http://ezinearticles.com/?Clapton-Is-God---Why?&id=6104644

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Who sounds and plays like Clapton? None that I can recall at the moment. Yes, I am sure there are a couple, but enough to still call Eric Clapton, GOD? I don't think so.

If anyone was in doubt that you're a fucking idiot this is even further proof. Only a "couple"? What size rock do you live under? By the way, I'm not a "Clapton is God" person but how one could be so totally unaware of Clapton's influence is beyond me. Ever heard of Duane Allman? George Harrison? Derek Trucks? Robert Cray? ..and that's just naming a few off of the top of my head.

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He might have been GOD then, but he isn't GOD now, and arguably hasn't been since late 1966 when a certain Mr Hendrix upset the applecart and threw the rule-book out the window. That's a fairly short reign for a GOD.

EC has spent the past 40 years playing anodyne Armani blues & icky derivatives, and snoozed his way through the most important decade in rock, contributing practically nothing of any substance to the 70s canon.

Sure, he's a great guitarist if you like that kind of thing, but many don't, and remain baffled by his deification, particularly in view of the fact that stylistically he's a pure copyist, and has written so few memorable songs during his career. IMO.

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He might have been GOD then, but he isn't GOD now, and arguably hasn't been since late 1966 when a certain Mr Hendrix upset the applecart and threw the rule-book out the window. That's a fairly short reign for a GOD.

EC has spent the past 40 years playing anodyne Armani blues & icky derivatives, and snoozed his way through the most important decade in rock, contributing practically nothing of any substance to the 70s canon.

Sure, he's a great guitarist if you like that kind of thing, but many don't, and remain baffled by his deification, particularly in view of the fact that stylistically he's a pure copyist, and has written so few memorable songs during his career. IMO.

Agreed Bouillon, I would not have put it quite so amicably though, but nevertheless his time with Cream was very memorable yes? some very innovative and monolithic/monumental songs there mate. ;)

Kind Regards, Danny

PS, Eric was Good, but never God, in my honest opinion. :o

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Clapton, Winwood Headed For Japan

Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood still can't find their way home,

preferring instead to play 12 dates in Japan this fall.

The Blind Faith comrades will launch their tour of Japan in Sapporo and wrap it up with a multi-night stand in Tokyo.

The tour begins at Sapporo's Hokkaido Prefectural Sports Center Nov. 17, plays the Yokohama Arena and spends two nights in Osaka, playing Castle Hall Nov. 21 and Osaka –Jo Hall Nov. 22. Other stops include Fukuoka (Nov. 24); Hiroshima (Nov. 26); Kanazawa (Nov. 28) and Nagoya (Nov. 30) before rolling into Tokyo for four nights at Budokan Hall Dec. 2-3 and 6-7.

General onsales begin June 24 via promoter Udo's website (translation may be required). For more information, visit EricClapton.com and SteveWinwood.com.

I was lucky enough to see Winwood with Petty a few years ago. What a great sound. Be great to see Clapton. I've been told by some who know far more than I about the extraordinary talent that is Eric Clapton, that he is the best guitarist who ever lived, simply because he can play anything

Enjoy the show(s), SAJ.

B)

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He might have been GOD then, but he isn't GOD now, and arguably hasn't been since late 1966 when a certain Mr Hendrix upset the applecart and threw the rule-book out the window. That's a fairly short reign for a GOD.

EC has spent the past 40 years playing anodyne Armani blues & icky derivatives, and snoozed his way through the most important decade in rock, contributing practically nothing of any substance to the 70s canon.

Sure, he's a great guitarist if you like that kind of thing, but many don't, and remain baffled by his deification, particularly in view of the fact that stylistically he's a pure copyist, and has written so few memorable songs during his career. IMO.

Not to argue, merely to counterpoint: Many believe the '60s - not the '70s - was the most important decade in rock and during that era EC was generally considered a god. Regardless, he released several substantive songs in the 70s: Layla, Bell Bottom Blues, I Shot the Sheriff, Wonderful Tonight and Cocaine among them. Furthermore, his critical acclaim and commercial success continued thru the following three decades as well. His body of work, influence, legacy, acclaim & success are arguably equal to that of his peers.

Edited by SteveAJones

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If nothing else, the Crossroads Festivals stand as an ongoing testament to Clapton's influence, then and now.

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If anyone was in doubt that you're a fucking idiot this is even further proof. Only a "couple"? What size rock do you live under? By the way, I'm not a "Clapton is God" person but how one could be so totally unaware of Clapton's influence is beyond me. Ever heard of Duane Allman? George Harrison? Derek Trucks? Robert Cray? ..and that's just naming a few off of the top of my head.

Hey! Hey! What is with the name calling you Fucking Asshole? Just kidding. You can call me any name in the book. Coming from you, call me all the names you want because they do not mean anything to me. Just words from someone I will never meet.

By the way, I live in Plano, Texas. The 69th largest city in America. I think that maybe you have seen that Geico commercial about people living under rocks way too much.

Back on topic. Didn't Duane Allman get killed in a motorcycle accident almost 40 years ago? If Duane Allman was influenced by Eric Clapton that influence was somewhat brief.

George Harrison. I would say that George Harrison was a more known guitar player before Eric Clapton. I do not see or hear that much, if any, influence of Clapton on Harrison.

Derek Trucks. Never heard of him.

Robert Cray. The only Robert Cray song I have heard is "Smoking Gun". I can hear Clapton's influence on that song. Great Song. Don't know about his other songs, though.

If these 4 came off the top of your head, I would like you to really think (and don't hurt yourself) and try and name me 8 more already famous and great guitar players that have been heavily influenced and/or emulate the guitar style and sound of Mr. Eric Clapton.

Call it a challenge. If you can, you win and I am a fucking idiot. If you can't then I will feel slightly vindicated. I already said that I could name dozens of already great and famous guitar players who have been influenced by Jimmy Page and have admitted as such. Dozens compared to 4 is not even close. Even if you can name 8 (or more) that still would not even come close to the Mighty Influence of Mr. James Patrick Page.

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I already said that I could name dozens of already great and famous guitar players who have been influenced by Jimmy Page and have admitted as such. Dozens compared to 4 is not even close. Even if you can name 8 (or more) that still would not even come close to the Mighty Influence of Mr. James Patrick Page.

He could name a hundred and you would still disagree. My point is this is an Eric Clapton Thread, or at least it was. Now I can look forward to ten or twenty more posts concerning the mighty influence of Jimmy Page here, as if there weren't enough threads available for that elsewhere.

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He could name a hundred and you would still disagree. My point is this is an Eric Clapton Thread, or at least it was. Now I can look forward to ten or twenty more posts concerning the mighty influence of Jimmy Page here, as if there weren't enough threads available for that elsewhere.

First of all, I think that by making the title of this topic: "Clapton is God" first and not "the Eric Clapton Thread" was sure to bring up or start some controversy. If I started a topic about Eric Clapton I would never put "Clapton is God" as the title under a topic on this "official" Led Zeppelin website. That is just how I perceive things. Maybe I am wrong, however, I could be right.

Second of all, that idiot jahfin could never name a hundred guitar players that have been influenced or emulate the guitar style of Eric Clapton. You know why? Because there is no where near 100 guitar players that would cite Mr. Clapton as a heavy influence. Alive or Dead.

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First of all, I think that by making the title of this topic: "Clapton is God" first and not "the Eric Clapton Thread" was sure to bring up or start some controversy. If I started a topic about Eric Clapton I would never put "Clapton is God" as the title under a topic on this "official" Led Zeppelin website. That is just how I perceive things. Maybe I am wrong, however, I could be right.

Second of all, that idiot jahfin could never name a hundred guitar players that have been influenced or emulate the guitar style of Eric Clapton. You know why? Because there is no where near 100 guitar players that would cite Mr. Clapton as a heavy influence. Alive or Dead.

Clapton Is God is not controversial for those aware of it's origins. I felt it was a suitable title for a thread intended to present his past, present and future artistic output. With regard to Clapton's influence on other guitarists, you are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts. We can just agree to disagree because the bottom line is Eric Clapton has remained a popular recording artist for nearly 50 years.

After years of admiring each others musical masterworks and guitar greats J.J. Cale and Eric Clapton have teamed up for the first time to create an original album together. It was produced and recorded by the duo in August 2005 in California. The resulting music defies being labeled into any one category, but instead finds influence across the spectrum of blues, rock, country and folk. A hybrid sound that is unique musically, while still bearing the signature styles of Cale and Clapton recognized by fans around the world. The songs are warm and rich, with deep flowing rhythms, yet use an economy of words to express much.

Edited by SteveAJones

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In the words of John McEnroe, "You CANNOT BE SERIOUS!!!"

First of all, you've NEVER heard of Derek Trucks? That disqualifies you from the discussion immediately. Anybody with a modicum of interest in blues-rock guitar knows who Derek Trucks is.

Second, Jimi Hendrix had more acolytes than SRV...Robin Trower, Frank Marino, Ted Nugent, Mick Ronson, Hilel Slovack, John Frusciante for starters.

Lastly, if you're too ignorant to know the history behind the "Clapton is God" phrase, then once again, that disqualifies you from being able to objectively discuss Clapton. I don't need to list 100 players...just one will suffice: Jimmy Page.

Yep, it was Clapton himself that inspired Jimmy (and hundreds more) to switch to the Les Paul/Marshall combination. Here's another name...Eddie Van Halen.

And I'm not even a Clapton fan. But your ignorance is alarming.

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Beano

This guitar is one of the most important instruments in the history of rock and blues. The guitar gained its nickname because of its appearance on the groundbreaking 1966 album, John Mayall And The Bluesbreakers featuring Eric Clapton, on the cover of which Clapton is famously reading a copy of the British comic The Beano.

Regarded by millions as the Holy Grail of all Les Paul Standards from the hallowed 1958-60 period, the sound of Beano in combination with Clapton's Marshall JTM45 amplifier (itself later referred to as the Bluesbreaker) is still one of the most sought-after tones amongst guitarists across the globe today. Such was the level of devotion at the time that fans even scrawled 'Clapton Is God' on walls all over London. During the recording of the Beano album in the spring of 1966, Clapton removed the nickel covers from the PAF humbucking pickups on his Les Paul, giving it a distinctive look. The guitar was stolen in July of that year, just as the iconic Bluesbreakers record was released. Speculation still abounds as to the instrument's whereabouts. We'll have more news about the Gibson 'Beano' Les Paul reissue soon.

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In the words of John McEnroe, "You CANNOT BE SERIOUS!!!"

First of all, you've NEVER heard of Derek Trucks? That disqualifies you from the discussion immediately. Anybody with a modicum of interest in blues-rock guitar knows who Derek Trucks is.

Second, Jimi Hendrix had more acolytes than SRV...Robin Trower, Frank Marino, Ted Nugent, Mick Ronson, Hilel Slovack, John Frusciante for starters.

Lastly, if you're too ignorant to know the history behind the "Clapton is God" phrase, then once again, that disqualifies you from being able to objectively discuss Clapton. I don't need to list 100 players...just one will suffice: Jimmy Page.

Yep, it was Clapton himself that inspired Jimmy (and hundreds more) to switch to the Les Paul/Marshall combination. Here's another name...Eddie Van Halen.

And I'm not even a Clapton fan. But your ignorance is alarming.

Just check out most of his posts, hes living in his own fairy dreamland.

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First of all, I think that by making the title of this topic: "Clapton is God" first and not "the Eric Clapton Thread" was sure to bring up or start some controversy. If I started a topic about Eric Clapton I would never put "Clapton is God" as the title under a topic on this "official" Led Zeppelin website. That is just how I perceive things. Maybe I am wrong, however, I could be right.

Second of all, that idiot jahfin could never name a hundred guitar players that have been influenced or emulate the guitar style of Eric Clapton. You know why? Because there is no where near 100 guitar players that would cite Mr. Clapton as a heavy influence. Alive or Dead.

This is the OTHER Bands/Music subforum. We don't have to talk about Led Zeppelin on this site all of the time.

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that idiot jahfin could never name a hundred guitar players that have been influenced or emulate the guitar style of Eric Clapton. You know why? Because there is no where near 100 guitar players that would cite Mr. Clapton as a heavy influence. Alive or Dead.

Jahfin knows what he's talking about, and you are simply wrong. If Clapton's career hasn't been particularly exciting or innovative for a long time now, it's due in large part to the fact that he had been both to such an amazing extent in the 1960's. He influenced Jimi Hendrix, who paid tribute to Cream for instance at the famous Winterland shows now up for a new release. He influenced Jimmy Page, who produced him with John Mayall in 1965 on a couple of tracks, and Jimmy himself has always acknowledged that the whole Les Paul into a Marshall with a degree of natural distortion from a very loud volume, etc. came straight from Clapton, who did it first. Practically every important guitarist in that period was influenced by what Eric did, first with Mayall and then Cream.

After Blind Faith and then Derek and the Dominoes things his musical output hasn't really had this quality so much. There have in fact always been opposed tendencies in his music, not least the blues purism that was never something Jimmy or Jeff were inclined to, as opposed to a tendency to go for the simple pop song - mind you, even if you don't necessarily like the latter so much, they are still often excellently written. He's still one of the greats. The period when he established his influence is long gone, and was more or less limited to the period from 1965-1970, but then that's how it works. Jimmy's influence was established decades ago too, from approximately 1967-1976, and it came after Clapton's for the most part, and presupposed Clapton's.

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In the words of John McEnroe, "You CANNOT BE SERIOUS!!!"

First of all, you've NEVER heard of Derek Trucks? That disqualifies you from the discussion immediately. Anybody with a modicum of interest in blues-rock guitar knows who Derek Trucks is.

Second, Jimi Hendrix had more acolytes than SRV...Robin Trower, Frank Marino, Ted Nugent, Mick Ronson, Hilel Slovack, John Frusciante for starters.

Lastly, if you're too ignorant to know the history behind the "Clapton is God" phrase, then once again, that disqualifies you from being able to objectively discuss Clapton. I don't need to list 100 players...just one will suffice: Jimmy Page.

Yep, it was Clapton himself that inspired Jimmy (and hundreds more) to switch to the Les Paul/Marshall combination. Here's another name...Eddie Van Halen.

And I'm not even a Clapton fan. But your ignorance is alarming.

Maybe my modicum has no interests in who the fuck Derek Trucks is.

I will skip all the other BS you speak of.

If my ignorance is so alarming, how come I have started one of the most viewed and replied to topics on this Great and Awesome Led Zeppelin website.

Led Zeppelin or Related on YouTube?. 40,517 views and 1,154 replies in just over 24 months. I do not see any topics that you have started that even come close to that. If you consider me so ignorant, how come my topic still receives so many views and posts? I started that topic so that many other Led Zeppelin fans could have a place to see, hear and enjoy the Music of, of course, Led Zeppelin or Related.

This is a LED ZEPPELIN website. Not an Eric Clapton website. If I was posting or commenting on an Eric Clapton website than maybe I would be disqualified.

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First of all, you've NEVER heard of Derek Trucks? That disqualifies you from the discussion immediately. Anybody with a modicum of interest in blues-rock guitar knows who Derek Trucks is.

Well, I'd never heard of Derek Trucks either, but I now see he's some kind of prodigy who's ended up in the Allman Brothers Band.

I don't care for Southern Rock, jam bands or the Allmans. Booo-ring. So I don't see how ignorance of DT should disqualify me or anyone else from discussing EC, who is not widely associated with that minority-interest genre.

Next thing, you'll be saying that unless we're conversant with all the obscure hee-haw bands that Jahfin lionises, we're not qualified to discuss LZ either :rolleyes:

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This is the OTHER Bands/Music subforum. We don't have to talk about Led Zeppelin on this site all of the time.

I totally agree. This is the perfect place for posts related to Eric Clapton. He was in the Yardbirds once, wasn't he? I saw Eric Clapton in 1969 when he was in Cream and they opened for Jimi Hendrix in Anaheim. A few years later I went to a concert in Anaheim that featured Judy Collins, B.B. King and John Mayall.

It appears that Hendrix had appeared at an earlier date in Anaheim before I saw him.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yqY-tYja9A

Edited by Silver Rider

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Led Zeppelin or Related on YouTube?. 40,517 views and 1,154 replies in just over 24 months. I do not see any topics that you have started that even come close to that. If you consider me so ignorant, how come my topic still receives so many views and posts? I started that topic so that many other Led Zeppelin fans could have a place to see, hear and enjoy the Music of, of course, Led Zeppelin or Related.

Your ignorance has nothing to do with the fact that a thread you made has 40,000 views. I'm not sure how you've linked the two together?

Also, did you not see my post above about this being the other bands/music subforum? This part of the site is specifically intended for threads such as this. It's your problem if you don't want to widen your palette and just stick to Zeppelin. But don't come in here spouting your garbage about how Clapton hasn't been influential, it simply isn't up for debate.

Edited by tom kid

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