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LZ songs just you don't like...

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Having given Carouselambra another chance, it isn't so bad but it's still on my list of least liked.

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Before I was in love with Tangerine, and only Tangerine. I couldn't stand any other song, I tried Black Dog but I couldn't stand it. Until, sooner or later, I started liking it. Some songs I don't really listen to today are Carouselambra, Ozone Baby, Wearing & Tearing, Walter's Walk, In The Evening, All Of My Love, Custard Pie, and usually I'll only listen to the intro of TSRTS. There are a lot of others too, Hot Dog used to be part of it but in recent weeks it's grown on me and I can say I like it. That goes for a lot of their songs, so perhaps one day I will like Carouselambra....

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Mostly ITTOD (just too much abba-ish) and Coda. IMHO.

I'm not sure what Coda catches so much shit, especially when you take into consideration that it's not an album they released while they were still an active band, it's a collection of rarities. That seems to make it an easy target.

As for In Through the Out Door, maybe it's just me but I don't hear even the slightest hint of an Abba influence on that record. Do you make a connection between the two simply because it was recorded at Abba's studio? If that's the case would you say it sounded too much like the Beatles if it had been recorded at Abbey Road studios? Seems like a very weak link to make to a record that has absolutely nothing in common with Abba's sound.

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I'm not sure what Coda catches so much shit, especially when you take into consideration that it's not an album they released while they were still an active band, it's a collection of rarities. That seems to make it an easy target.

As for In Through the Out Door, maybe it's just me but I don't hear even the slightest hint of an Abba influence on that record. Do you make a connection between the two simply because it was recorded at Abba's studio? If that's the case would you say it sounded too much like the Beatles if it had been recorded at Abbey Road studios? Seems like a very weak link to make to a record that has absolutely nothing in common with Abba's sound.

Maybe it was the time, I mean this was moving into the *cringe* 80's and there's that synth-y sound you can hear from that era. I dunno, I get ITTOD having an Abba sound but I wouldn't be able to dissect and rationalize it for explanation. Maybe it's the pop feel of the album? Also Robert's voice :(

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Maybe it was the time, I mean this was moving into the *cringe* 80's and there's that synth-y sound you can hear from that era. I dunno, I get ITTOD having an Abba sound but I wouldn't be able to dissect and rationalize it for explanation. Maybe it's the pop feel of the album? Also Robert's voice :(

Perhaps but when I listen to In Through the Out Door, I'm not suddenly reminded of "Dancing Queen" or any other Abba songs for that matter. I've also never considered "Pop" to be a dirty word so that may play into my opinion as well. That, and I've never knocked In Through the Out Door in the manner that I've seen it criticized here (and to think, people are still bitching about the early Rolling Stone reviews). Bands must evolve or die and In Through the Out Door is the sound of a very vital band working through some very difficult internal conflicts as well as coping with an ever changing musical climate. I guess some people would have been content with them repeating Led Zeppelin II for eternity, I'm not one of them. I loved that record when it was released and I love it in 2012. It may not be my favorite Zeppelin record (that honor goes to Presence), nor is it the pockmark on their career that so many make it out to be. To me, it's the sound of a band in flux and coming out victorious on the other side.

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Perhaps but when I listen to In Through the Out Door, I'm not suddenly reminded of "Dancing Queen" or any other Abba songs for that matter. I've also never considered "Pop" to be a dirty word so that may play into my opinion as well. That, and I've never knocked In Through the Out Door in the manner that I've seen it criticized here (and to think, people are still bitching about the early Rolling Stone reviews). Bands must evolve or die and In Through the Out Door is the sound of a very vital band working through some very difficult internal conflicts as well as coping with an ever changing musical climate. I guess some people would have been content with them repeating Led Zeppelin II for eternity, I'm not one of them. I loved that record when it was released and I love it in 2012. It may not be my favorite Zeppelin record (that honor goes to Presence), nor is it the pockmark on their career that so many make it out to be. To me, it's the sound of a band in flux and coming out victorious on the other side.

I agree with you on the Pop genre, though I still think pre-80's pop was a lot better (Abba included). I also agree with bands evolving their sound as they grow, and I acknowledge the context of ITTOD and that this was a heavy time in Zeppelin's career and personal lives, but no matter how much we look into those external factors it still boils down to whether you dig the music or not, and most people did not. I liked Fool in The Rain and recently Hot Dog, and I can appreciate every album for the story it tells or its background and history, but if I strip off all that and I'm left with the music, I won't think about whether I like it or not, I just either will or won't. I can never choose a favourite album, but if I had to, currently I'd say III :)

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I love "Pop" music and by Pop music I don't just mean "Popular music", I mean the style more widely known as Power Pop that has been perfected by artists such as Nick Lowe, Elvis Costello, Cheap Trick, Big Star, R.E.M., Rockpile, Tommy Keene and tons of others that have their roots in bands such as the Beatles. In that regard, I think it only got better in the 80's. When In Through the Out Door first came out I was only thinking of it in the context of it being the latest Led Zeppelin album, it wasn't until years later that I learned about all of the behinds the scenes stuff. Even then, it didn't change my opinion of the record. These days, I'm afraid a lot of newer fans that weren't around then that read every thing they can get their hands on about Zeppelin arrive with a lot of preconceived notions about In Through the Out Door and are completey unable to form a solely objective opinion about the record. That's not to say that a lot of the negative things I've read about In Through the Out Door aren't justified but thinking back to 1979 I can't think of a single person I knew that knocked it with the amount of vitriol that I've seen here. Hell, it even got a pretty favorable review in Creem magazine back then. Again, we all have our own opinions but mine is definitely in the favorable column when it comes to In Through the Out Door.

As for the samba section mentioned above in reference to "Fool In the Rain", I love it and have always found it to be a very pivotal part of the song. Not only that but it puts Zeppelin's love of world music on full display. Again, I'm probably in the minority when it comes to the album most Zep fans love to hate.

Edited by Jahfin

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I love "Pop" music and by Pop music I don't just mean "Popular music", I mean the style more widely known as Power Pop that has been perfected by artists such Nick Lowe, Elvis Costello, Cheap Trick, Big Star, R.E.M., Rockpile, Tommy Keene and tons of others that have their roots in bands such as the Beatles. In that regard, I think it only got better in the 80's. When In Through the Out Door first came out I was only thinking of it in the context of it being the latest Led Zeppelin album, it wasn't until years later that I learned about all of the behinds the scenes stuff. Even then, it didn't change my opinion of the record. These days, I'm afraid a lot of newer fans that weren't around then that read every thing they can get their hands on about Zeppelin arrive with a lot of preconceived notions about In Through the Out Door and are completey unable to form a solely objective opinion about the record. That's not to say that a lot of the negative things I've read about In Through the Out Door aren't justified but thinking back to 1979 I can't think of a single person I knew that knocked it with the amount of vitriol that I've seen here. Hell, it even got a pretty favorable review in Creem magazine back then. Again, we all have our own opinions but mine is definitely in the favorable column when it comes to In Through the Out Door.

As for the samba section mentioned above in reference to "Fool In the Rain", I love it and have always found it to be a very pivotal part of the song. Not only that but it puts Zeppelin's love of world music on full display. Again, I'm probably in the minority when it comes to the album most Zep fans love to hate.

No, I'm with you, I think it is a great album, I have two reviews of Houses of the Holy, and the two journalists absolutely slated it.

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The mamba section is my favourite part! It's so dancey and I love the beat, but it was one of the songs I didn't initially like. And about the new fans being influenced by what is already known of Zeppelin, yeah i totally get that. I think fans who were around during the height of a band will appreciate their music and legacy differently than someone who discovers them long after they've disbanded, and I think this goes for just about any form of art. But personally, I didn't start off by listening to Zeppelin in terms of records. I listened to them on shuffle and didn't know what song was from which album, didn't get into the biographies until way after. And though my parents had an influence on the music i listen to, you could still say I got into LZ blindly :)

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The mamba section is my favourite part! It's so dancey and I love the beat, but it was one of the songs I didn't initially like. And about the new fans being influenced by what is already known of Zeppelin, yeah i totally get that. I think fans who were around during the height of a band will appreciate their music and legacy differently than someone who discovers them long after they've disbanded, and I think this goes for just about any form of art. But personally, I didn't start off by listening to Zeppelin in terms of records. I listened to them on shuffle and didn't know what song was from which album, didn't get into the biographies until way after. And though my parents had an influence on the music i listen to, you could still say I got into LZ blindly :)

NO offence whatsoever to you, but that idea fills me with horror - the band were painstaking about their albums and what order the tracks were laid down in. It was massively important to them even which song open and closed a side of an album. Getting into them any other way is certainly hard to avoid these days but I'm very glad that wasn't the way for me. ;)

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I love "Pop" music and by Pop music I don't just mean "Popular music", I mean the style more widely known as Power Pop that has been perfected by artists such Nick Lowe, Elvis Costello, Cheap Trick, Big Star, R.E.M., Rockpile, Tommy Keene and tons of others that have their roots in bands such as the Beatles. In that regard, I think it only got better in the 80's. When In Through the Out Door first came out I was only thinking of it in the context of it being the latest Led Zeppelin album, it wasn't until years later that I learned about all of the behinds the scenes stuff. Even then, it didn't change my opinion of the record. These days, I'm afraid a lot of newer fans that weren't around then that read every thing they can get their hands on about Zeppelin arrive with a lot of preconceived notions about In Through the Out Door and are completey unable to form a solely objective opinion about the record. That's not to say that a lot of the negative things I've read about In Through the Out Door aren't justified but thinking back to 1979 I can't think of a single person I knew that knocked it with the amount of vitriol that I've seen here. Hell, it even got a pretty favorable review in Creem magazine back then. Again, we all have our own opinions but mine is definitely in the favorable column when it comes to In Through the Out Door.

As for the samba section mentioned above in reference to "Fool In the Rain", I love it and have always found it to be a very pivotal part of the song. Not only that but it puts Zeppelin's love of world music on full display. Again, I'm probably in the minority when it comes to the album most Zep fans love to hate.

Great post Jahfin, I agree. I was 12 when ITTOD came out and I remember it as a triumph. And FITR has always been one of my favorites, always found it amazing that the four guys who did You Shook Me were now taking a detour to samba without the aid of studio musicians; let's see the Stones do that (and I love the Stones)!

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NO offence whatsoever to you, but that idea fills me with horror - the band were painstaking about their albums and what order the tracks were laid down in. It was massively important to them even which song open and closed a side of an album. Getting into them any other way is certainly hard to avoid these days but I'm very glad that wasn't the way for me. ;)

Hahaha no I don't blame you, and yes this has a lot to do with how music is shared these days, it's all scattered and all digital. This Christmas I plan to buy a turntable and more records, we only have 2 of Zeppelin ones (used to have all, lost it in a flood before I even got into them) and listen to all of them in order. And as much as I wish I had been around during that golden age, the way I discovered Zeppelin was in its own way exciting. Sure it wasn't the way it was intended but I can't do anything about that, and learning about 50 years of their career in retrospect is fascinating in a different way. Watching the documentaries and reading articles, being new to old things like it was just happening, it's like a great discovery of an archive. By ignorantly putting it on shuffle the first time around, I absorbed individual songs without knowledge and prejudice. Later on after reading into the band and completing/fixing the discography, I realized a lot of the songs I wasn't too into were from ITTOD. But like I said, one day I could just suddenly get into, say, Carouselambra or Hats Off To (Roy) Harper

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I dont have any songs that I dont like from Zep,same thing with Skynyrd. All other bands I can say have songs I dont like ex: The Rolling Stones-many songs I hate.

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NO offence whatsoever to you, but that idea fills me with horror - the band were painstaking about their albums and what order the tracks were laid down in. It was massively important to them even which song open and closed a side of an album. Getting into them any other way is certainly hard to avoid these days but I'm very glad that wasn't the way for me. ;)

I've never really given it a lot of thought but the way in which we were exposed to music back then was markedly different as you had no choice but to hear an album in it's entirety whether it be on vinyl, cassette, 8-track or reel-to-reel. Of course you could make your own mix using several of those formats but more often than not, you were hearing the album all the way through, just as the artists intended.

I dont have any songs that I dont like from Zep,same thing with Skynyrd. All other bands I can say have songs I dont like ex: The Rolling Stones-many songs I hate.

Nor do I. I have least favorites but no songs I actually hate. With Skynyrd however, I don't really count the work of the post-crash band. There's some decent stuff there but it doesn't measure up in any remarkable way to the work done by the pre-crash version of the band. Without Ronnie Van Zant the heart and soul of Lynyrd Skynyrd is simply not there. As for the Stones, I can't really think of a single song of theirs that I hate but there are quite a few I've heard way too many times but that's also true of a lot of other bands, including Zeppelin and Skynyrd. It doesn't mean I hate those songs, it just means I probably have less of a desire to listen to them because they've become so ingrained in my brain after years of having them pounded into my subsconscious due to overplay on the radio.

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I've never really given it a lot of thought but the way in which we were exposed to music back then was markedly different as you had no choice but to hear an album in it's entirety whether it be on vinyl, cassette, 8-track or reel-to-reel. Of course you could make your own mix using several of those formats but more often than not, you were hearing the album all the way through, just as the artists intended.

Nor do I. I have least favorites but no songs I actually hate. With Skynyrd however, I don't really count the work of the post-crash band. There's some decent stuff there but it doesn't measure up in any remarkable way to the work done by the pre-crash version of the band. Without Ronnie Van Zant the heart and soul of Lynyrd Skynyrd is simply not there. As for the Stones, I can't really think of a single song of theirs that I hate but there are quite a few I've heard way too many times but that's also true of a lot of other bands, including Zeppelin and Skynyrd. It doesn't mean I hate those songs, it just means I probably have less of a desire to listen to them because they've become so ingrained in my brain after years of having them pounded into my subsconscious due to overplay on the radio.

I was only implying pre crash Skynyrd! The new version dont even enter my mind!

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I was only implying pre crash Skynyrd! The new version dont even enter my mind!

I never got to see the original Lynyrd Skynyrd. They had a tour date scheduled for North Carolina on The Tour of the Survivors in support of their Street Survivors album but then history took it's course. When they regrouped in 1987 for the Tribute Tour I was there. Of course it wasn't the same but it's the closest I've ever come to seeing Lynyrd Skynyrd. With all due respect to the surviving members, it probably should have ended there. As the years have gone on, it's become more than evident that you simply can't have a band called Lynyrd Skynyrd without the presence of Ronnie Van Zant.

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I've never really given it a lot of thought but the way in which we were exposed to music back then was markedly different as you had no choice but to hear an album in it's entirety whether it be on vinyl, cassette, 8-track or reel-to-reel. Of course you could make your own mix using several of those formats but more often than not, you were hearing the album all the way through, just as the artists intended.

Nor do I. I have least favorites but no songs I actually hate. With Skynyrd however, I don't really count the work of the post-crash band. There's some decent stuff there but it doesn't measure up in any remarkable way to the work done by the pre-crash version of the band. Without Ronnie Van Zant the heart and soul of Lynyrd Skynyrd is simply not there. As for the Stones, I can't really think of a single song of theirs that I hate but there are quite a few I've heard way too many times but that's also true of a lot of other bands, including Zeppelin and Skynyrd. It doesn't mean I hate those songs, it just means I probably have less of a desire to listen to them because they've become so ingrained in my brain after years of having them pounded into my subsconscious due to overplay on the radio.

I agree with you 100%.

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When "In Through the Out Door" was released, it immediately entered the Billboard charts at #1 and stayed #1 for 7 weeks. It was their biggest selling album since "Physical Graffiti", selling more than "Presence" and "The Song Remains the Same" combined. It created such a surge of record buyers flooding record stores that not only did Led Zeppelin set a record by having every one of their albums in their catalogue appear simultaneously on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart(a feat never equaled), but they were credited with saving the record industry that year.

"ITTOD" also gave Led Zeppelin its highest radio presence in years. Of course, the prime FM rock stations were all over the album, playing every track from the album...and often. Even Carouselambra. What was different, however, was the push it got from AM radio, previously not a receptive place for Led Zeppelin, due to the length of their songs and the hard nature of their music. But songs like "Hot Dog" and "Fool In the Rain" found a home on AM radio, and exposed Led Zeppelin to a whole new audience.

Lastly, the reviews for ITTOD were some of the best of their career. The LA Times was very ambivalent about the band throughout the 70s, yet Terry Atkinson wrote a rave review for ITTOD in the LA Times. Even Robert Christgau had kind words for the album, giving it a B.

This whole idea of "In Through the Out Door" being a flop or not a 'real Led Zeppelin' album is revisionist malarkey.

Edited by Strider

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Fool in the rain

Hots on for nowhere

Dy'er Ma'ker

Hot Dog

South Bound Saurez

All My Love

...and I am just tired of Black Dog (thanks to Plant).

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Ittod, was released to FM rado stations Jim Ladd, on KMET, played the whole album. I was listing and I thought WOW. Didn't get some of the tracts then, but they all grew on me. Couldn't wait for the tour, to support it. I don't get how often the whole album is mentioned in this thread. As I now listen to my LZ on digital media I could and do skip songs, but never a Zeppelin song.

Great topic thou.

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i like everything.even the crunge that took me some time,

but if that counts .it might be a thing if you don´t listen

often to a song...

ittod

south bound..

darlene.

royl orleance

but in opposite to some in here i love

out on the tiles,tea for one and hats off to roy harper and wearing and tearing

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