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The majority of merchandise (tees, posters, etc.) has "US Tour 77" on it. Why? What was so important about the 77 tour?

Thanx for any info!! :D

Its the best, that's why, Duh. :slapface: :slapface: :slapface: :slapface: :slapface: :slapface: :slapface: :slapface:

Edited by jimmy page66
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The majority of merchandise (tees, posters, etc.) has "US Tour 77" on it. Why? What was so important about the 77 tour?

Thanx for any info!! :D

How's it going "ms_zeppelin94" as well as our fellow die hard hard core ZEPPELIN fanatics? There are many reasons why the 1977 Tour was important but I'll name a few. The first reason is because the 1977 Tour was the mighty LED ZEPPELIN'S BIGGEST Tour to date. The second reason is because it was ZEPPELIN"S first Tour since the 1975 Tour. The third reason is because it was time for ZEPPELIN to perform new songs live on the 1977 Tour from the band's most recent 1976 album "PRESENCE." The Fourth reason is because ZEPPELIN (Healthwise) had something to prove with Robert Plant coming off that almost fatal car crash involving his wife Maureen and Pagey's daughter Scarlet. Robert Plant was not 100% healthy meaning that he had not fully recovered from the injuries he sustained from the car accident by the time the 1977 Tour began. If you see the Seattle Kingdome performance from 17 July 1977 on DVD, you will notice that Robert still had a limp. I even noticed the limp Robert had from both shows that I saw in person at The Forum in L.A. on 23 June 1977 and one month later at the Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California on 23 July 1977. These are only some of many reasons why. I feel confident that many of our fellow ZEPPELIN fanatics will have other reasons. ROCK ON!

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It was sort of like a second US 73' tour if you view it that way, just that it took something massive and made it even more, there were darker vibes in this tour too, also the light show took a turn an it was made that much sicker, with lasers and smoke, hundreds of lights and incredible stage moves.

It was also a great opportunity to see Zeppelin, about 50% of the people who saw it on this board saw them that year, they where about the biggest band in the world and the eager frenzy and anticipation in the concerts was beyond amazing, they sold out every single arena/stadium they where at, set new attendance records and, whilst most performances are rather poor compared to other years, they gave a few incredible & legendary performances.

All together, it was probably the band's most iconic tour, a tour that would be remembered by double neck guitars, white dragon suits and a technically peaking Bonham.

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The majority of merchandise (tees, posters, etc.) has "US Tour 77" on it. Why? What was so important about the 77 tour?

Thanx for any info!! :D

Because by 1977 the band had evolved into super-mega-stars. Selling out 6 nights at both the Forum in LA and Madison Square Garden in NY and all of those attendance records everywhere else, etc.

The tours from 1968-1972 had the band basically doing their own thing. Selling out and playing marathons, but not really doing much promotion and merchandise wise. By 1973, they shifted to a more publicity-oriented approach: Publicists, personal assistants, private planes, bigger money and crowds. 1975 repeated that formula even moreso. So by 1977, they were veteran mainstays that had a huge legacy behind them. They had already done it that way the last two tours, so they upped the game considerably.

The merchandise represents that. A huge well-marketed music machine. Keep in mind that the 1977 was the longest consecutive tour that they ever did. To the most people as well.

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It was Led Zeppelin's first shows after a 2 year break because of Robert's Plant injury. But it ended up being their longest consecutive tour as others have said, and it had some of their longest shows. The term "3 Hours of Lunacy" came from shows on this tour. It was really Led Zeppelin's last major tour.

Edited by NickZepp
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It was Led Zeppelin's first shows after a 2 year break because of Robert's Plant injury. But it ended up being their longest consecutive tour as others have said, and it had some of their longest shows. The term "3 Hours of Lunacy" came from shows on this tour. It was really Led Zeppelin's last major tour.

Not really...it was, definitively....

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So is the 1980 tour not real because it took place in Europe and not the U.S.? Or not big enough - if so, then what is big enough? :huh:
It was over-all a terrible selection gigs. with hardly any people attending. Edited by jimmy page66
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It was over-all a terrible selection gigs. with hardly any people attending.

But it WAS a tour. And it was high time they toured Europe, because, aside from Brussels and Rotterdam in '75 and Copenhagen in '79, they hadn't since 1973. Sheer size, as 1977 should tell us, also isn't everything. :D

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It was over-all a terrible selection gigs. with hardly any people attending.

Like Otto said, '80 was pretty much Zeppelin's first time on the Continent in seven years.That was a pretty big deal. "Hardly any people attending" :rolleyes: ...were you there? Probably not. Point is, the 1980 tour -same rules would have applied if they actually made North America- was scaled down in every sense of the term...a deliberate reaction to the excesses of 1977. No massive lighting, no lasers bouncing off the ceiling, no thirty minute solos. "Cut the waffle" was the term Page used to describe the changes.

But, yeah, '77 was the biggest tour anybody had ever attempted up to that point. Hell, the first full on stadium tour -CSNY- was only three years previous. In 1977 precedents were still being set regarding concert tours; the book was only half-written...not like it is nowadays where everything has pretty much become a rehash of what's gone before and most of the time the audiences are getting fucked one way or another (let's own up, shall we?), if not by ridiculously high ticket prices then by shoddy performances (especially when it comes to classic rockers past their prime...yeah, Stones, I'm talking to YOU! B) ). As for Zeppelin in '77, the recordings we have, unfortunately cannot do it full justice- the 1977 Tour Of The United States was really a case of "you had to be there" (sadly I wasn't- I was only nine at the time). Still love it, though...

Edited by Nutrocker
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But it WAS a tour. And it was high time they toured Europe, because, aside from Brussels and Rotterdam in '75 and Copenhagen in '79, they hadn't since 1973. Sheer size, as 1977 should tell us, also isn't everything. :D

That's not what I've heard Otto :P:lol:

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I'm not a huge fan of the 77 tour as far as how the band played overall. Robert's vocals were back to near what they were in the early 70s though. Jimmy's playing was really sloppy compared to any tour and drugs were really effecting how the band was playing. But the hype surrounding the tour is really what made it big.

Edited by NickZepp
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most of the time the audiences are getting fucked one way or another (let's own up, shall we?), if not by ridiculously high ticket prices then by shoddy performances (especially when it comes to classic rockers past their prime...yeah, Stones, I'm talking to YOU! B) ).

I saw the Stones do really red-hot shows way into the 80s, and although I haven't seen them live since then, Shine a Light convinces me they can still get it done now!

Sorry to thread-jack.

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So is the 1980 tour not real because it took place in Europe and not the U.S.? Or not big enough - if so, then what is big enough? :huh:

1980 was a short jaunt compared to the sheer length of 1977...and the (deliberately) scaled-down set gave it more the feeling (at least to me) of a warm-up for the impending 1980 US Tour Peter Grant had been planning all along (but not telling Robert about until after)...

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1980 was a short jaunt compared to the sheer length of 1977...and the (deliberately) scaled-down set gave it more the feeling (at least to me) of a warm-up for the impending 1980 US Tour Peter Grant had been planning all along (but not telling Robert about until after)...

I don't get what you say, unless it was before or shortly after the European tour, tickets where already sold, and there are many 80' US tour T-Shirts around.

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The 1980 US Tour was to start in late October 1980. From everything I've read over the years, Plant had flat out said NO to going back to the USA, but he agreed to the 1980 Euro tour. When that tour ended (early July 1980) Grant was able to convince Plant to do it, and THEN began planning the tour, getting tickets printed, t-shirts, etc...Bonzo didn't die until the end of Sept 1980...

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Performance speaks louder than merchandizing.

For the 1977 tour, merchandizing was SCREAMING! I prefer what goes in my ears versus what I cover my torso with.

I'll leave it at that.

That's how I am, too. :D

I don't really know what they sounded like overall (I've just seen a few bootleg videos)on the 77 tour. But I am pretty sure that, as others have said, drugs were interfering by 77 and their performance suffered. Really, 77 is probably not my favorite tour.

So, back to the merchandizing thing...I see a Zeppelin shirt, I buy. Most of my shirts do have something about the 77 tour on them, but frankly, I couldn't care less. For all it's worth, I'd like to have something from a earlier tour, because that's what made me fall in love with Zeppelin.

Don't get me wrong, I love the later stuff too, but the earlier music & performances is what really got me hooked. (Albert Hall, January 9, 1970; to be exact):wub:

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The real creative "LIVE" band Zeppelin was died after 72 I think. And it was because Jimmy couldn't or for the most part wouldn't play with the same authority that he had in the early day's of the band. His tone suffered too much for me after 73. They were still great, but I think all the creating they did on stage was on it's way out. they were still doing cool stuff on stage but it was different than what they originally started out as. I used to think the 77 tour was the one I would like the band to release a live CD of, but I think something from 68 or 69 would be what they really were about. Kind of like the stuff on the DVD from Albert Hall 70. Bring It On Home & How Many More Times are just killer on that show !! That is Jimmy at his best with Robert right in his pocket !!!!! They had great show's their whole career but the first 5 year's were their best on a stage. I did just pick up a show from 75 and it is great stuff !! From St. Louis.

Edited by 68/80 guy
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