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SteveAJones

Robert Plant Band of Joy Tour 2011

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I saw Robert Plant and his band today at Jazz Fest (New Orleans). I'm now a believer again. It was amazing, great, wonderful, etc etc. He got a HUGE response as the last number ended before the encore. He has a fantastic line up of talented musicians playing with him. I would describe the music as Psychedelic Folk. The guy has such a presence on stage. You cant help but dig the stuff. The first three songs were great as was the latter half of the show. It did get kind of slow in the middle as a few numbers had the same drive (slow) and tempo. All in all, it was great and eveyone around us seemed to really be impressed by a band they had never heard. Jeff Beck was right before Robert. Beck was pretty good, but Robert's band was a step above and had great energy. Enjoy your time in New Orleans Robert, we love you man!!!!

I will post some video of the show soon.......

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^^ Can't wait for your videos

Robert Plant rambled on at the New Orleans Jazz Fest

Published: Friday, April 29, 2011, 8:24 PM Updated: Friday, April 29, 2011, 8:30 PM

By Keith Spera, The Times-Picayune NOLA.com

Deep into his closing Acura Stage set on Friday at the New Orleans Jazz Fest, Robert Plant sang, "Could it be you've found another game to play?"

He has indeed found another game to play. Instead of cashing in on a Led Zeppelin reunion, he has, over the past few years, embarked on a road less trampled underfoot. With a variety of first-rate players, he has explored the music of Appalachia and its common root with the Celtic music that informed a certain quartet from the Misty Mountains. His "Raising Sand" collaboration with Alison Krauss yielded a hit album and a slew of accolades. He has continued that exploration with his current Band of Joy, featuring alt-country singer Patty Griffin and Nashville guitar innovator Buddy Miller, a holdover from the "Raising Sand" project.

Even moreso than Plant's 2008 Jazz Fest show with Krauss, his Friday set found common ground with his past, even as he and his fellow travelers rendered it even more haunted. In "That's the Way," Miller nursed preening and keening solos as Griffin strummed an acoustic over drummer Marco Giovino's understated brushstrokes. (The decades-old line about "all the fish that lay in dirty water dying" could well have been written about last year's BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.)

Dressed down in a dark T-shirt and jeans, Plant was in fine voice; his Led pipes are still solid. He was generous with the spotlight. Darrell Scott, the not-so-secret weapon who conjured spooky steel guitar solos and picked a mandolin, stepped out front to sing lead on his "A Satisfied Mind"; Plant retreated to the rear of the stage, a bit player in a brace of big, bold country harmonies. Griffin sang more effectively on "A Satisfied Mind" than in her own showcase; she is not quite the foil for Plant that Krauss was.

For the Plant solo hit "In the Mood," Scott's pedal steel droned as Giovino struck floor toms with mallets. The ensemble revived "Please Read the Letter" that was faithful to the "Raising Sand" rendition.

At least a half-dozen Zeppelin chestnuts turned up in the set, starting with the opening "Black Dog." "Misty Mountain Hop" passed through a particularly haunted hollow. ("Those misty mountains are actually up around Seattle," Plant quipped.) A revamped, utterly engaging "Houses of the Holy" swung. In "Ramble On," the pastoral verses gave way to a bombs-away chorus; the arrangement also featured a bouzouki solo.

In the encore, Plant gave a shout-out to Jeff Beck, who appeared on the same stage earlier Friday. Plant noted that he and Beck "have one or two people in common," a reference to Beck's fellow Yardbird, Jimmy Page. Alas, Beck did not materialize for a hoped-for collaboration at the Fair Grounds.

Where his particular brand of electric guitar heroics would have fit in this Appalachian drone is uncertain. A final romp through "Gallow's Pole" included a banjo, Byron House strumming a bow across his upright bass, and a vintage yelp from Plant.

Earlier, he described this third act of his career as "miraculous." At the very least, it's a game he's winning.

http://www.nola.com/jazzfest/index.ssf/2011/04/robert_plant_dug_deep_into_spo.html

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I saw Robert Plant and his band today at Jazz Fest (New Orleans). I'm now a believer again. It was amazing, great, wonderful, etc etc. He got a HUGE response as the last number ended before the encore. He has a fantastic line up of talented musicians playing with him. I would describe the music as Psychedelic Folk. The guy has such a presence on stage. You cant help but dig the stuff. The first three songs were great as was the latter half of the show. It did get kind of slow in the middle as a few numbers had the same drive (slow) and tempo. All in all, it was great and eveyone around us seemed to really be impressed by a band they had never heard. Jeff Beck was right before Robert. Beck was pretty good, but Robert's band was a step above and had great energy. Enjoy your time in New Orleans Robert, we love you man!!!!

I will post some video of the show soon.......

Hi Rock Historian from a fellow New Orleanian,

I was at the same show and it was absolutely amazing. Totally agree about Beck, it was great seeing him play since I've never seen him perform before and he was good and at times mesmerizing, but Sir Robert and The Band of Joy upstaged him. Plant seemed to be so enjoying himself right from the start! You could tell he was enjoying being back in New Orleans and I like that when he came out he said "Hello N' Awlins", trying to sound like a native and that he "loved being back in New Orleans because he's had so many good memories here." He was rockin' and just having a grand time. The crowd was getting into him and he was getting into the crowd. The crowd was immense to say the least. I asked my husband about how many people did he think were around the stage area watching his performance and he said well over 2000, probably more like 3000. There was no way to get close to the stage (and especially for someone who has a touch of claustrophobia) , but the screens were so big and crystal clear, it was like you right on top of the stage and the sound mixing was spot on. The music was clear and perfect. I saw Robert and the BOJ last summer in Houston and went away 'wanting', for lack of a better word. I could never really put my finger on it, but the show or the sound mixing, or the crowd or something wasn't right. To me it was just OK, but not spectacular. But yesterday, I experienced what I wanted to experience in Houston, the show, the man, the band, the music, the venue, the crowd, everything - I left walking away on cloud 9, it was spectacular. Just a fabulous show and performance from Robert in a great city on a beautiful day! Please come visit us often Robert, we DO love you down here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Have some pics and will post soon. :)

P.S. Thank you so much Silver Rider for posting the videos. I can relive this amazing show!!!!!!!!!! Also I wanted to mention that I loved the fact that Robert had this lime green feather stuck in his jean pocket, and I thought it might have been a New Orleans Mardi Gras Indian homage thing but then realized feather! Duh! :slapface:

Edited by justawoman

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Thanks for the videos. :) I was there too, and it was an excellent show. I agree with most of justawoman's review (except that I thought Houston last year was an unbelievable show, and that I don't think Beck was upstaged, they were perfect complements to each other playing completely different kinds of sets). I'm looking forward to the pics, as mine were pretty awful, despite being as close as we could get to the barrier separating us peasants from the VIPs. :D

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Thanks for the videos. :) I was there too, and it was an excellent show. I agree with most of justawoman's review (except that I thought Houston last year was an unbelievable show, and that I don't think Beck was upstaged, they were perfect complements to each other playing completely different kinds of sets). I'm looking forward to the pics, as mine were pretty awful, despite being as close as we could get to the barrier separating us peasants from the VIPs. :D

ahh, aqua, i should have checked with you, of course you were there, and i missed ya. i was close to the barrier, too just stage left.

i agree: beck left the crowd electrified, especially using the native trombone player for the sly stone encore (anyone know him?). but our boy had no worries, i think he would have liked to have had jeff sit in. myself, i think BOJ is the perfect band for the jazzfest-robert and the band seemed hooked into the hoodoo and the vibe for everyone was amazing. i think BOJ is really hitting their stride and it could well be the best band robert's ever had except for one. where i was standing, a middle-aged couple brought a 10 year old boy who is learning guitar and mandolin. he couldn't see. i said"no worries, all these people will be cool and let him up to the fence." he didn't want to ask but i knew he wanted to get closer so i asked for him and everyone was great. he thought robert was incredible...

thanks for the video posting-way better than mine!

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... and the sound mixing was spot on.

the mix was the best of any year i've been there, and not just for robert's show-every stage sounded spectacular!

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i think BOJ is really hitting their stride and it could well be the best band robert's ever had except for one. where i was standing, a middle-aged couple brought a 10 year old boy who is learning guitar and mandolin. he couldn't see. i said"no worries, all these people will be cool and let him up to the fence." he didn't want to ask but i knew he wanted to get closer so i asked for him and everyone was great. he thought robert was incredible...

Totally agree beatbo - BOJ is hitting their stride. They are working together like a well oiled machine. And . . . . . . how nice of you to speak up to get that young man up to the fence so he could see better. That's another thing I found about the event, everyone was so nice and friendly and really into the spirit of "laissez les bon temps rouler". They don't call it the Big Easy for nothin'. :)

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Thanks Debs, Aquamarine Silver Rider and Rock Historian for the vids and feedback of the show. Robert loves doing festivals and hopefully he'll have it within himself to play ACL in September as he has no dates scheduled in Texas, so it may be a possibility. We shall see.

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Thanks Debs, Aquamarine Silver Rider and Rock Historian for the vids and feedback of the show. Robert loves doing festivals and hopefully he'll have it within himself to play ACL in September as he has no dates scheduled in Texas, so it may be a possibility. We shall see.

I'd fly down for THAT!

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Have been trying to post some pics of Jazz Fest, but they came out really small. :( I don't know what is wrong.

Edited by justawoman

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Yes, my Mistress. You know your wish is my command. ;-)

One week later...

Sorry for making you wait, Deborah, and everyone else. I'm sure you'll devise a suitable punishment. In the meantime, let me take you back a week ago to Saturday morning, April 23, 2011. After months and months of agonizing waiting and waiting for the Band of Joy tour to hit the Los Angeles area, the day had finally come.

Even though I had been out til late Friday night, I still got up early Saturday morning to do my usual concert routine: get in line for standby/release tickets. No Ticketmaster bullshit for me. Got to the Greek Theatre at 8am; perfect...I was first in line! Next person didn't show up until 9am, and he was there to buy Lykke Li tickets.

So the two hours I had to kill until the box office opened at 10am, was spent reading the paper, watching the joggers/hikers go by, and chatting with whoever showed up to ask questions. When 10am rolled around, there were only 4 of us queued up for Robert Plant tickets. I had a suspicion that this tour didn't have the buzz that the Raising Sand tour had. For one thing, the Raising Sand tour booked two nights at the Greek, while the Band of Joy scheduled one. But I didn't care...to me, the Band of Joy album was just as good, even better in some ways, as Raising Sand. And I was anticipating this concert as highly as I had the Raising Sand shows...hell, as much as I have ALWAYS anticipated a Robert Plant concert, of which there have been many. As far as I was concerned, the less heat there was for the show, the better chance I had of scoring good seats for me and my friend.

Naturally, the first tickets available when the box office opened were scattered singles in section b and the side terraces...the only pairs were in section c. I passed and let the people behind me grab them if they wanted. The trick is to be patient, that is the key. Different bands and promoters have different ways of releasing tickets. Some make the good seats available right away; others will wait until 4, 5, 6, or even as late as right before showtime before releasing them. So as the morning's hazy gloom gave way to brilliant sunshine, I settled down and readied myself for a long wait. At 12 noon, the lady at the B.O. waved me over and said she had 2 singles available...they were great seats (section A row E and section A row A), but I took a chance and passed on them, confident some pairs would pop up later.

More people arrived...some buying whatever was available and others joining our few, but hardy crew in line. Another benefit to doing this is that you get to hear the bands do soundcheck. At exactly 4:55pm, Robert and the BOJ began their soundcheck. After a couple minutes of random guitar chords and other instruments warming up, they began to play a song...it was "That's the Way", and it sounded gorgeous. The Greek is an outdoor venue and with the box office situated just to the north of the amphitheatre, you can hear it pretty well. They spent just over 30 minutes on "That's the Way", then started running through "Black Dog". At exactly 5:45pm soundcheck was over. By this time, the line had grown to around 20 people and now, after hearing soundcheck, spirits were high, and a little anxious.

Fortunately, the wait was soon over. At 6pm, a mere 15 minutes after soundcheck, I was waved up to the box office window and a couple minutes and $196 later I had a pair of tickets in my hand: Section A Center Row A, seats 116 & 117; the first row right behind the pit section. So I wouldn't be right up against the stage like I was for Raising Sand, but still pretty great seats...maybe 20 feet from the stage. The next couple of people behind me also got section A's, although a few rows further back or off to the side.

I didn't stay any longer. It had been a long day in the sun on little sleep the night before. I needed to freshen up and get some liquid and perhaps a light supper in me if I was gonna make it through the concert. Therefore, ironically I was leaving the Greek just as Ledzepfvr was arriving. We had made plans to meet up at the show. As it happened, me and my friend didn't get to the concert until around 8:15 or so. So I would have to wait until intermission to look for Ledzepfvr.

Having arrived midway through the North Mississippi Allstars opening set, I am afraid I didn't hear enough to give a proper opinion on their set. As we arrived at our seats, they were just ending a song and then Luther and Cody Dickinson both sat down with acoustic guitars and played a pretty darn good instrumental version of the Allman Brothers "Blue Sky". This was followed by Luther picking up a cigar-box guitar while his brother Cody got back behind the drums and played a wwshboard that was hooked up to a flanger or some other sound effects gadget. They then closed their set with "Amazing Grace", with Luther on bottleneck guitar. Missed their version of Dylan's "Stuck Inside of Mobile...", which I would've liked to have heard. The crowd, or most of them seemed to enjoy them.

During intermission, while my friend went to the loo and then purchased drinks, I made the climb from section A to section C, where Ledzepfvr was sitting. I recognized her immediately...just like her photo, she's a hot little redhead. Sorry guys, she's married. Seriously, she is nice as can be and we had a fun little chat. However, as I didn't want to miss the beginning of Plant's set, nor have my friend wondering where I'd wandered off to, I had to regrettably bid adieu and make my way back to my seat. Later I was kicking myself, for in my haste I had neglected to invite her and her hubby to join us for a post-show nosh.

One thing I noticed during intermission was that the music that was playing between bands was one of the best mixes I had ever heard at a concert. Lots of vintage treats! Upon arriving back at my seat, I spied about 4 rows in front of us Pamela and Michael Des Barres. And I am pretty sure Lori Mattix was sitting with them. But just as I was going to go up and say "hello" and confirm whether it was Lori or not, the house lights went dark. It was time for the main event!

At 9:15pm, the Band of Joy strode on stage to the cheers of about 5,800 lucky concert-goers. Robert looked cool as ever, blue jeans and a dark blue button-down shirt with some sort of pattern on the back. Patty was looking lovely, wearing a beautiful dress that showed off her legs to terrific effect. Buddy Miller was wearing one of his "Buddy" hats. The rest of the band I'm sure most of you know by now, hut just in case there are any stragglers reading this, there is original Band of Joy member Byron House on bass; drummer Marco Giovino; and secret weapon Darrell Scott on guitar, mandolin, banjo, and what looked to be an oud...or maybe it was a basouki.

The show kicked off with "Black Dog", in an arrangement similar to Raising Sand, but to my ears it didn't seem as intense as the versions I heard on that tour. And the crowd was quite lacking in energy during the "ah-ah" call-and-response part. The Santa Barbara crowd was much better during this part a couple days later. Perhaps it was because people were still finding their way to their seats...or it was that L.A. laidb-backness, but I thought "Black Dog" didn't achieve the affect it should have. It was an okay opening song, but not a great one IMO. But at least it was out of the way and the band could begin digging into more obscure nuggets.

Which was what they did on the second song of the night; as the song went on, my friend and I looked at each other in puzzlement. We knew it wasn't on the BOJ album, nor on Raising Sand. Was it a cover? A Robert Plant solo song? We wracked our memories but came up empty. Whatever it was, it was good and showed Robert's voice and newly-honed singing style to great effect. It wasn't until the next day that we discovered it was a track from the underrated "Fate of Nations" album called "Down to the Sea". A great choice for the set...at this point in his career, I prefer hearing the more lesser-known songs, and he seems more enthusiastic singing them than some of the old warhorses.

Next up is "Angel Dance", an up-tempo number by LA legends Los Lobos. Contrary to what some reviewers have said, the audience has been on its feet for all three songs so far. In fact, it wasn't until about the 7th song that most people sat down, so don't believe the cracks some people made about the crowd only standing forvLed Zeppelin tunes. Anyway, now that the band can sense the audience enjoying themselves, you can see smiles widen as the band starts to really relax and cut loose. They really get into some nice harmonies on this song, including a long swooping one at the end. Sweet.

Then the first real crowd ERUPTION of the night occurs as the BOJ swings into "Black Country Woman", a favourite from Physical Graffiti and always a highlight of those 1977 shows, even in truncated form. Tonight, Robert and the band really nail it, goosed by the fervor of the crowd...and vice-versa. For this Band of Joy is really spreading the joy around. People are smiling and grooving and bopping along. Even the two kids next to us have stopped texting.

Oh, and here's another falsity I've read on occasion: that there's a lack of chemistry between Robert and Patty. Or not enough eye contact. Bah! Don't know what show they were watching. I saw plenty of interaction at the Greek...and at Santa Barbara Bowl. Black Country Woman was the song that really kicked the concert into high-gear, as the BOJ dived into the heart of the set.

Starting with Richard Thompson's "House of Cards", the set became song after song of examples of not only FABULOUS singing with FANTASTIC harmonizing; but also sonic excursions into the highways and byways of what writer Greil Marcus once called that old weird strange America.

As a slow-burning, smokey-blue cover of Low's "Monkey" (YES!!!), with Robert menacingly hissing "shut up and drive" and Buddy ramping up the tension with reverb-ladened guitar leads to a fine singing turn by Buddy on his "Somewhere Trouble Don't Go", with Robert graciously ceding the spotlight (as he would do several times during the show), and provide wailing harmonica support...and THAT leads into an absolute gorgeous "That's the Way", a shimmering gem with Buddy supplying a suitably Nashville take on Jimmy Page's ethereal guitar lines in the song, as Patty and Darrell strum the acoustics, it becomes clear that the lessons of Raising Sand have taken hold.

And those are the communal joys of harmonizing, the brotherhood of a band with multiple singing and instrumental talents. The spookiness of the slow-burning groove and how a soft-spoken line and spare instrumentation can sound just as menacing and edgy as a brigade of heavy metal guitars. After these last two albums and tours, I think it's fair to say that the old joke about "lead singer disease" doesn't apply to Robert Plant...if it ever did.

Robert Plant is now a man happy and at ease with his chosen vocation, and it is showing nightly in his stage demeanor. He looks like he's having a ball up there and he really enjoys his fellow band mates and derives pleasure in watching them perform, and therefore has no qualms about letting them take the spotlight.

And take the spotlight Darrell Scott does, as he and the entire band delivers a riveting take on the Porter Wagoner classic, "A Satisfied Mind". Up to now, the singing has been fantastic. With "Satisfied Mind" and "Satan Your Kingdom Must Come Down", it takes on a superlative, SPIRITUAL GLOW. In fact, by the end of the mesmerizing "Satan...", the show has begun to feel like you've stumbled into some freaky revival meeting deep in the Louisiana backwoods.

Well, if you're going to bring down Satan, it helps to have an Angel on your side, and Plant has a good one in Patty Griffin. A little more earthy than the ethereal Alison Krauss, all the same she's got the voice...and she's a looker, too. She gets her turn at a solo spot, performing an old Big Maybelle song, "Ocean of Tears" with plenty of heartfelt emotion. Then, a real fun highlight..."In the Mood", with Percy and Patty together side-by-side stage right, cooing up a storm!

Again, how can people say there's no interaction between Patty and Plant? When people said the same thing during the Raising Sand tour I chalked it up to Led Zeppelin fans being bitter that Plant had turned his back on a reunion tour. Now, it must be either the same bitter Zeppelin fans, along with some Alison Krauss fans upset that Robert chose to work with Patty instead of Alison this time.

"Please Read the Letter" follows...close to its "Raising Sand" arrangement. This is a song that Raising Sand rescued for me. Before, on Page & Plant's "Clarksdale", it was kind of lost in the crowd; I never really paid attention to it. But hearing it on Raising Sand and on the tour that followed, I was struck by its poignancy. And it further shows how wrong-headed Sarah Vowell's review of Clarksdale in Spin magazine was. A very moving song and Patty and Plant do it justice.

Now it's time to lift the spirits and have a little fun heading into the home stretch, and the Zeppelin double-whammy of the never performed in Zeppelins heyday "Houses of the Holy" and "Ramble On" fit the bill nicely and "Ramble" provides the occasion for the Golden God to let loose one of those roars of yore!

All too quickly it seems, the band takes a bow as the main set ends. Minutes go by with all of us wildly cheering for an encore. Which we get.

But it's all over much too quick...you never wanted the show to end. It's like you're gathered around the campfire and you just want to keep sitting 'round roasting marshmallows and singing songs. You don't want to leave the warm glow of the fire and face the cold dark night.

Alas, though, the show must end, and after "Harms Swift Way" and "Gallows Pole", we are treated to a nostalgic tip of the hat to the Grateful Dead when the show ends with "And We Bid You Goodnight", a song the Dead used to close their concerts with.

And it is somehow fitting that the Band of Joy ends the concert a cappella, with each member taking a turn at the mic. For these last few years for Robert Plant have been mostly about getting down to the heart-and-soul of the roots of American music, whether it be the swamps of the Bayou or the hills of Appalachia. It has also been about a new way of singing, of learning to blend your voice with others and the power of restraint and subtlety.

It was a hard, hard life in those hidden away places in the Appalachian Mountains...or the Bayou...or the dusty plains of Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas. And singing was a way of fighting fears, of sharing the burdens of life by singing about shared experience. And even if you were too poor to afford an instrument, providence provided humans with their own instrument...their voice.

The first music mankind made was with his voice, singing a cappella out into the scary, mysterious Neanderthal world.

So, in a concert that was a celebration of the glory of the human voice and the way it has been used throughout time to provide solace and uplift to the soul, I can think of no more apropos ending than to have our five merry men and woman cast aside their instrumental armour and stand bare against the night, with just their voices, so glorious and true, send us off with such a warm adieu.

And that was that. Almost as soon as they left the stage, the house lights went up...there would be no second encore. It was exactly 10:48pm when the concert ended; 1 hour and 33 minutes. My friend and I fairly floated out the Greek and down through the roads of Los Feliz, leaving behind the ghosts of James Dean and the LaBiancas.

And then I come here and I still encounter people whining about Plant not doing a reunion and calling him names, as if that would make any difference.

Look, part of me understands your desire...especially you young kids who missed out. But think of it like this: isn't one of the reasons you became a Zeppelin fan to begin with is that they did things their own way; always with passion and integrity. They never conformed or did something just for the money.

So if Plant did the reunion without any real passion for it, as a sop to the fans, wouldn't that be against the very principles you admire Led Zeppelin for?

Robert Plant is an artist...yes, an ARTIST with a capital A. And he has his muse to follow, and he, and only he can know where that will lead. And when you become a fan of any band or artist, you are somewhat placing your trust in them and if you are committed, you will follow them down any artistic.trail.

There is a moving scene in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers. King Theoden has only recently broken free of the spell Sarumen cast on him. He knows he has been unwise. Now as he prepares for battle, his aide Gamling helps him put on his armour.

The scene as follows:

Theoden: Who am I, Gamling?

Gamling: You are our King, sire.

Theoden: And do you trust your King?

Gamling: Your men, my Lord, will follow you to whatever end.

Theoden: To whatever end...

And that, in a nutshell, is how I feel about Robert Plant. I TRUST HIM. And will follow him wherever.

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Great view and personal perspective on the Greek show Strider. Well done!

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^ ^ ^

Excellent post & review Strider!!!!!

And I totally agree with your assessment here: "Robert Plant is now a man happy and at ease with his chosen vocation, and it is showing nightly in his stage demeanor. He looks like he's having a ball up there and he really enjoys his fellow band mates and derives pleasure in watching them perform, and therefore has no qualms about letting them take the spotlight"

He sure is having fun..... Go Robert!!!!! :thumbsup:

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^^Strider, Great review, I could imagine your day with the detailed write up!!! Really enjoyed you sharing it with us. Yes ledzepfvr is a great lady!! It nice to share the adventures and thoughts we all have after seeing one of the events... and like you..to whatever end:-) :D

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Thanks, Sam--what a great picture, and how nice to see Terry Reid looking so well (if a tad different from the mod I remember :lol: ).

Great review, strider--and beatbo, next time! ;)

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