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What Made You Un-Happy Today ?


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If you're gonna do anything more invasive than drawing blood, knock my ass OUT!!! You can take that local shit and stick it in yer own ass! Take me down the fucking rabbit hole man! And don't be in no hurry about it either! Take me down sloooooowwwww.

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Seriously - did you demand it, or just ask nicely? I don't have insurance, and usually get slammed for several hundred bucks each visit. I don't see why I have to be in such discomfort and listen to this guy whoop it up the whole time. Worst part is, I'm stuck with him because my wife's whole family has been going to him for decades. Maybe he'll retire, or OD on the gas soon...

I demanded it! I am his customer/patient, his job to take care of me. Dentistry is not cheap, even eith insurance. I think I pay $75 evrytime he has used it on me...well worth it:-)

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If you're gonna do anything more invasive than drawing blood, knock my ass OUT!!! You can take that local shit and stick it in yer own ass! Take me down the fucking rabbit hole man! And don't be in no hurry about it either! Take me down sloooooowwwww.

Really, man! I try to picture guys in the civil war, who get their legs sawed off - but at least they got some slugs of booze back then. This one moron at work seems obsessed with colonoscopies, and goes around trying to convince people to get it done without being knocked out, because it's the most fascinating experience he's ever had. That's one "fantastic voyage" I prefer to sleep through...

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THAT FUCKING DOG AGAIN!

Seriously. This old lady just doesn't GET IT!

Just go kick her ass Manders. :D

MY assinine neighbor is BANGING again. Bitch. :o:angry:

AND my youngest daughter's boyfriend is really pissing me off again.

He's going to be one scared lil puppy at our going away party for my son. :)

* I do not condone violence btw...only if it involves protecting my cubs.*

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^LOL

I was just rehearsing my little speech.

It's hard to keep bad wording and the cuss words out of it, I'm so annoyed!

Seriously. She lives behind me and one house over. I can hear her dog everywhere in my freakin' house!

I think I'm just going to call animal control. Seriously.

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You CAN most definitely call, but I would call the police. They'll go let her know there are local noise ordinances (hopefully there are), as well as nuisance laws.

I've seen these kind of cases on some of those "judge so and so" shows and they HAVE to do something if it's a ongoing thing.

Usually they'll tell her to keep her dog indoors if she can't shut him up.

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I've heard other neighbors yelling at him too.

It barks when she lets him out, and she doesn't go out there with him. She lets him out for about twenty minutes every hour!

Fuuuck.

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...and the little fucker's AT IT AGAIN!

Call animal control for gods sake. They will most surely calm him down. Or get a slingshot...

I am a bit sad because I know I will have to leave some of my favorite things to do and focus where I need to focus. I wont leave the forum or Dragons Of Darkness. But they will sure look neglected compared to now B)

However it will be a good thing....

ROCK ON!

Edited by Mary Hartman
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A couple of weekends ago, I attended continuing education classes in Cincinnati. I have to take 25 hours of class every year to renew my Optometry license. After a break for lunch, as our speaker was beginning his afternoon lecture, he walked to the back of the class, and asked "Does he have a pulse?" I was sitting in the front row, and everyone turned around to see what was going on!

One of the doctors attending the class had slumped over in his seat. A female Optometrist sitting next to him was holding him up, thinking that he just fell asleep (you know how boring these lectures can be!). But he had lost consciousness. They put him on the floor, and it took several minutes for anyone to start CPR. Everyone in the room could do CPR, but no one would take the initiative to do it. I was in the first row, and the incident happened in the next to last row. There were about 100 Optometrists there! I ran out of the room to get a lifequard with a defibrillator, as the meeting was at a hotel with an indoor water park in it. As I came back with the defibrillator, the police were arriving, followed within a minute by the rescue squad. They got there within about 5 minutes of the incident, very fast. We were ushered out of the room while they worked on him. When they took him out, the paramedic was on the guerney pumping his chest. It didn't look good.

I just got a letter today from the seminar promoter saying that the doctor died.

Here is my take on the situation. It was amazing to me how long it took for those sittng next to him to do anything, even to alert the speaker that something was wrong. And then there was a long hesitation for anyone to start CPR. Everyone was waiting for someone else to take charge. Then afterward, everyone in the class acted like nothing happened. No one talked about it. Everyone was stunned. The speaker just started lecturing again, without delay. The class finished on schedule. The entire delay from the incident was only about a half hour. When I ran out of the room, people sitting around me looked at me like I was nuts for doing something. I just couldn't just st there and do nothing. I am just glad that they sent us a letter to let us know the outcome.

The reaction to this incident represents a classic study in crowd psychology.

Edited by BUCK'EYE' DOC
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A couple of weekends ago, I attended continuing education classes in Cincinnati. I have to take 25 hours of class every year to renew my Optometry license. After a break for lunch, as our speaker was beginning his afternoon lecture, he walked to the back of the class, and asked "Does he have a pulse?" I was sitting in the front row, and everyone turned around to see what was going on!

One of the doctors attending the class had slumped over in his seat. A female Optometrist sitting next to him was holding him up, thinking that he just fell asleep (you know how boring these lectures can be!). But he had lost consciousness. They put him on the floor, and it took several minutes for anyone to start CPR. Everyone in the room could do CPR, but no one would take the initiative to do it. I was in the first row, and the incident happened in the next to last row. There were about 100 Optometrists there! I ran out of the room to get a lifequard with a defibrillator, as the meeting was at a hotel with an indoor water park in it. As I came back with the defibrillator, the police were arriving, followed within a minute by the rescue squad. They got there within about 5 minutes of the incident, very fast. We were ushered out of the room while they worked on him. When they took him out, the paramedic was on the guerney pumping his chest. It didn't look good.

I just got a letter today from the seminar promoter saying that the doctor died.

Here is my take on the situation. It was amazing to me how long it took for those sittng next to him to do anything, even to alert the speaker that something was wrong. And then there was a long hesitation for anyone to start CPR. Everyone was waiting for someone else to take charge. Then afterward, everyone in the class acted like nothing happened. No one talked about it. Everyone was stunned. The speaker just started lecturing again, without delay. The class finished on schedule. The entire delay from the incident was only about a half hour. When I ran out of the room, people sitting around me looked at me like I was nuts for doing something. I just couldn't just st there and do nothing. I am just glad that they sent us a letter to let us know the outcome.

The reaction to this incident represents a classic study in crowd psychology.

Wow Buckeye, that is some story. I know if it had been at a conference i was attending (nursing and/or nursing and doctors mixed) there wouldn't have been hesitation to start CPR. There would have been too many people trying to help. It's shocking that nobody else thought to find a defibrillator except for you. Since you were so far away from the incident to start with, i fully understand why it took so long for you to realize what was happening. But, with everyone being BCLS certified, someone should have checked the doctor's breathing and pulse, and appropriately started CPR and appointed someone to call 911/find a defibrillator. Very sad story to me. If this wasn't a conference filled with medical professionals i would understand the reality of what happened... but this sounds inexcusable to me.

The nonchalant manner in which the conference continued on seems insensitive as well. I'm sorry the doctor didn't make it. I'm sure this will weight heavy with you for a long time to come. At least you had the good judgement to do something.

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A couple of weekends ago, I attended continuing education classes in Cincinnati. I have to take 25 hours of class every year to renew my Optometry license. After a break for lunch, as our speaker was beginning his afternoon lecture, he walked to the back of the class, and asked "Does he have a pulse?" I was sitting in the front row, and everyone turned around to see what was going on!

One of the doctors attending the class had slumped over in his seat. A female Optometrist sitting next to him was holding him up, thinking that he just fell asleep (you know how boring these lectures can be!). But he had lost consciousness. They put him on the floor, and it took several minutes for anyone to start CPR. Everyone in the room could do CPR, but no one would take the initiative to do it. I was in the first row, and the incident happened in the next to last row. There were about 100 Optometrists there! I ran out of the room to get a lifequard with a defibrillator, as the meeting was at a hotel with an indoor water park in it. As I came back with the defibrillator, the police were arriving, followed within a minute by the rescue squad. They got there within about 5 minutes of the incident, very fast. We were ushered out of the room while they worked on him. When they took him out, the paramedic was on the guerney pumping his chest. It didn't look good.

I just got a letter today from the seminar promoter saying that the doctor died.

Here is my take on the situation. It was amazing to me how long it took for those sittng next to him to do anything, even to alert the speaker that something was wrong. And then there was a long hesitation for anyone to start CPR. Everyone was waiting for someone else to take charge. Then afterward, everyone in the class acted like nothing happened. No one talked about it. Everyone was stunned. The speaker just started lecturing again, without delay. The class finished on schedule. The entire delay from the incident was only about a half hour. When I ran out of the room, people sitting around me looked at me like I was nuts for doing something. I just couldn't just st there and do nothing. I am just glad that they sent us a letter to let us know the outcome.

The reaction to this incident represents a classic study in crowd psychology.

My dear, Buck'eye' Doc, I am very sorry. Words probably cannot describe such a tragedy. At least you attempted to save the doctor's life. You were good to do so. May your colleague rest in peace. :(

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My dear, Buck'eye Doc, I am very sorry. Words probably cannot describe such a tragedy. At least you attempted to save the doctor's life. You were good to do so. May your colleague rest in peace. :(

Thanks, Fan_S.

The letter I received today said that the doctor graduated from Optometry school in 1969, so that would make him about 65 or so.

He looked like Santa Claus, he had white hair and a white beard, a little chubby. No one went with him to the hospital in the squad. I didn't know him at all. I don't even know if anyone there really knew him. There were 5 from my graduation class of 58 there, and none of my class mates knew who he was. Of course, we are alot younger than he was.

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Thanks, Fan_S.

The letter I received today said that the doctor graduated from Optometry school in 1969, so that would make him about 65 or so.

He looked like Santa Claus, he had white hair and a white beard, a little chubby. No one went with him to the hospital in the squad. I didn't know him at all. I don't even know if anyone there really knew him. There were 5 from my graduation class of 58 there, and none of my class mates knew who he was. Of course, we are alot younger than he was.

You're very welcome, Dr. It is good to know there are physicians like you out there with a heart of gold, whose first impulse & thought is to save another person's life. :)

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My computer's monitor at work was acting up this morning...it wasn't displaying anything until like, 5 minutes later. I told a coworker about it, and she was like, "Well maybe you shouldn't be using your family pictures as your screensaver." Apparently she thought the problem was due to a virus. I called our IT department to report the problem, and it was confirmed the problem was caused by the monitor itself. I got a new monitor and everything was back to normal. It had NOTHING to do with a virus. I was pissed that my coworker automatically assumed it was my fault that the monitor was not working.

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Wow Buckeye, that is some story. I know if it had been at a conference i was attending (nursing and/or nursing and doctors mixed) there wouldn't have been hesitation to start CPR. There would have been too many people trying to help. It's shocking that nobody else thought to find a defibrillator except for you. Since you were so far away from the incident to start with, i fully understand why it took so long for you to realize what was happening. But, with everyone being BCLS certified, someone should have checked the doctor's breathing and pulse, and appropriately started CPR and appointed someone to call 911/find a defibrillator. Very sad story to me. If this wasn't a conference filled with medical professionals i would understand the reality of what happened... but this sounds inexcusable to me.

The nonchalant manner in which the conference continued on seems insensitive as well. I'm sorry the doctor didn't make it. I'm sure this will weight heavy with you for a long time to come. At least you had the good judgement to do something.

Hi ~tangerine~,

Somehow I missed your post originally and didn't mean to disregard it.

I was shocked at how many minutes passed before anyone acted in the back of the room. I don't know how long it was because I couldn't see in the back. But the lecturer did yell to call 911 right away once he realized that something was wrong. And someone must have called, because the paramedics arrived very quickly, surprisingly so, within 5 minutes. The fire station had to be close by. This happened near Kings Island, an ammusement park, so the station was near by for it. I wouldn't have hesitated to do CPR if I was close to him.

And it was extremely weird to me that everything went on like nothing happened, like it was an everyday occurence that someone has a heart attack all the time. And no one said a word, not even the lecturer, about what happened. I asked the organizer after the class was over if he heard how the doctor was doing, and he didn't know, but stated that the squad didn't speed away after they loaded him in, so that was not a good sign. I was only one of two people who stayed afterward to find out how he was doing!

I think that everyone was in shock.

And the crowd psychology definitely took over, and no one wanted to look un-cool and show any emotion at the situation.

Edited to say: Maybe my perception of time was distorted due to the situation. But my perception was that people didn't react immediately, and there definitely was hesitation waiting for someone to take charge and do something, even the lecturer showed hesitation, and he was not the one to do CPR. He had to ask if anyone knew CPR! Maybe people were waiting for him to take the lead and be the one to act since he was in charge of the class as the speaker.

Edited by BUCK'EYE' DOC
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Hi ~tangerine~,

Somehow I missed your post originally and didn't mean to disregard it.

I was shocked at how many minutes passed before anyone acted in the back of the room. I don't know how long it was because I couldn't see in the back. But the lecturer did yell to call 911 right away once he realized that something was wrong. And someone must have called, because the paramedics arrived very quickly, surprisingly so, within 5 minutes or so. The fire station had to be close by. This happened near Kings Island, an ammusement park, so the station was near by for it. I wouldn't have hesitated to do CPR if I was close to him.

And it was extremely weird to me that everything went on like nothing happened, like it was an everyday occurence that someone has a heart attack all the time. And no one said a word, not even the lecturer, about what happened. I asked the organizer after the class was over if he heard how the doctor was doing, and he didn't know, but stated that the squad didn't speed away after they loaded him in, so that was not a good sign. I was only one of two people who stayed afterward to find out how he was doing!

I think that everyone was in shock.

And the crowd psychology definitely took over, and no one wanted to look un-cool and show any emotion at the situation.

sad.gif What a sad world we live in.

Several years back there was a similar situation where I work, we have a carrier station behind the vehicle maintenance shop which would be a good 50 yards to walk from there to our shop.

One day this supervisor walked over to the shop to ask if anyone knew cpr?blink.gif

They had about 70 people working back there many of which are veterans of the military and I'm sure several of them had been taught cpr in the military.

No one wanted to do anything for their fellow co-worker?ohmy.gif

I just couldn't stand there and do nothing!dry.gif

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Hi ~tangerine~,

Somehow I missed your post originally and didn't mean to disregard it.

I was shocked at how many minutes passed before anyone acted in the back of the room. I don't know how long it was because I couldn't see in the back. But the lecturer did yell to call 911 right away once he realized that something was wrong. And someone must have called, because the paramedics arrived very quickly, surprisingly so, within 5 minutes. The fire station had to be close by. This happened near Kings Island, an ammusement park, so the station was near by for it. I wouldn't have hesitated to do CPR if I was close to him.

And it was extremely weird to me that everything went on like nothing happened, like it was an everyday occurence that someone has a heart attack all the time. And no one said a word, not even the lecturer, about what happened. I asked the organizer after the class was over if he heard how the doctor was doing, and he didn't know, but stated that the squad didn't speed away after they loaded him in, so that was not a good sign. I was only one of two people who stayed afterward to find out how he was doing!

I think that everyone was in shock.

And the crowd psychology definitely took over, and no one wanted to look un-cool and show any emotion at the situation.

Edited to say: Maybe my perception of time was distorted due to the situation. But my perception was that people didn't react immediately, and there definitely was hesitation waiting for someone to take charge and do something, even the lecturer showed hesitation, and he was not the one to do CPR. He had to ask if anyone knew CPR! Maybe people were waiting for him to take the lead and be the one to act since he was in charge of the class as the speaker.

Hi Buckeye Doc, i gave this some thought and wonder... i work in critical care so the people i work with are all quick to jump on a patient having problems. We have too many codes in a years time (due to the level of sickness we deal with in our patient population). The doctors at your conference probably rarely or have never had an emergency situation arise before their eyes. I don't consider that an excuse, but maybe it's an explanation. Any person, even a layman, who has taken BCLS, should be willing to help someone in need. CPR is crucial right away until someone can be shocked, so the people closest should have been quick to act. I have heard many stories of average people in shopping malls running for the automated defibrillator when someone is found down. I believe that every doctor there who saw but didn't react should be ashamed. I can't explain how the conference went on so thoughtlessly...seems a break and discussion on what just happened might have been appropriate...

thanks for sharing your story. It's ashame you weren't sitting nearby or maybe this man would have had a better outcome. At least you care... hopefully others did too, but just didn't know how to show it (maybe a little shock set in)?

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