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SteveAJones

Steve Gorman (Black Crowes) Discusses Jimmy Page

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August 2010

My Old Kentucky Blog: What was it like working with Jimmy Page?

Steve Gorman: That was an absolute blast. Every second we did that, I loved it. He was awesome. Just such a gentleman. Not awesome in the "he's the ultimate rock star" sense. On any level, he's just a great guy to work with. Consummate professional. Just really spectacular. A lot of lessons, not that he's even pontificating on anything, it's totally not in his nature, but just being around him you can't help but pick up things. The biggest thing I got from him was that his motivation in everything was just to find the spirit. Get a buzz about it. If it feels good, then you can take it in front of someone else, but let's get something that feels right. He was never talking about "get the notes right" or "you're rushing this section" or "that's dragging." Never, ever. He just wanted to find the feel. And when the band would all lock in together, that's when his cape would come out and it had a big 'S' on it and he would just take off. He would always say, "The spirit, guys. We gotta find the spirit," and it's true.

http://www.myoldkent...log.com/?p=8279

^^^

His comments are further proof that the long-standing rumor that Jimmy Page and The Black Crowes parted on bad terms are absolutely false.

Edited by SteveAJones

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Before someone from total fandom posts anything derogatory about that tour I'd just like to say.........it was genuine, it was real. Page was epic, so were the Crowes.

Nice article, thanks for posting the link.

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Steve Gorman seems like an awesome guy

never went to the shows but the live album was amazing

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I saw Jimmy Page and the Black Crowes and they were absolutely phenomenal. I was amazed with the whole show, especially when they played, "In the Light" and "Hots on for Nowhere".

I also have three Page and the Crowes dvds: Roseland Ballroom, New York (10/13/1999), Jones Beach Arena, New York (7/10/2000) and Greek Theater, Los Angeles (10/19/2000). All excellent quality dvds. I also have eight Page/Plant dvds (with one more on the way), with the late Michael Lee on drums.

I may take some flak for saying this, however, I honestly think that Steve Gorman played drums better than Michael Lee did when playing Led Zeppelin songs. Of course this is just MY honest opinion. When I watch my dvds of Page and the Crowes (Gorman) and Page and Plant (Lee), I think Steve played drums more in the "Style" and "Flair" of Bonzo. More poised and relaxed in his playing. On the other hand, Michael Lee seemed more "wild" and "bouncy" in his style of playing his drums on the Led Zeppelin songs. We all know that Bonzo was a "wild" man in his playing and his lifestyle. If anyone has some of these dvd bootlegs of Page/Crowes and Page/Plant then some may understand what I am trying to say. Others could disagree with me completely. All I know is that I am very fortunate to have any and all these dvds that I can find.

So with that being said and the good things that Steve Gorman has to say about our Jimmy, I have the utmost respect for the man and his talents as a Great and under-rated drummer.

Edited by lzzoso

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August 2010

My Old Kentucky Blog: What was it like working with Jimmy Page?

Steve Gorman: That was an absolute blast. Every second we did that, I loved it. He was awesome. Just such a gentleman. Not awesome in the "he's the ultimate rock star" sense. On any level, he's just a great guy to work with. Consummate professional. Just really spectacular. A lot of lessons, not that he's even pontificating on anything, it's totally not in his nature, but just being around him you can't help but pick up things. The biggest thing I got from him was that his motivation in everything was just to find the spirit. Get a buzz about it. If it feels good, then you can take it in front of someone else, but let's get something that feels right. He was never talking about "get the notes right" or "you're rushing this section" or "that's dragging." Never, ever. He just wanted to find the feel. And when the band would all lock in together, that's when his cape would come out and it had a big 'S' on it and he would just take off. He would always say, "The spirit, guys. We gotta find the spirit," and it's true.

http://www.myoldkent...log.com/?p=8279

^^^

His comments are further proof that the long-standing rumor that Jimmy Page and The Black Crowes parted on bad terms are absolutely false.

Steve, I'm sure you'd know better than me but wasn't Chris Robinson quoted as saying that he respected Jimmy "as a musician, but not as a man," after Jimmy injured his back and pulled out of that tour? I've never heard anything but glowing comments about Jimmy from Gorman, Rich Robinson, and Audley Freed, but Chris was definitely pissy about it. Maybe it was the drugs talking?

And I saw 5 dates on that tour, two at Roseland, 2 in NJ, and Jones Beach, and they were spectacular, especially in the summer of 2000. I know Jimmy loves the power trio format but having Chris and Audley around really brought out the lead guitarist and showman in Jimmy!

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It's great to see Gorman get some attention here.

As a big fan, and fellow Kentuckian, who has had the pleasure to meet him a few times, I can tell you all that he's a total class guy.

I saw him shortly after he returned from the O2 show, and he went on and on about how great it was - he's a huge Zeppelin fan!

He always mentions the tour with Page as the highlight of his career - and I agree that he was great on that tour!

Check out his advice column - it's hilarious and he talks about Jimmy and Bonham regularly:

http://blackcrowes.com/wwws/

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A couple of examples of Gorman's wit and love of JP and JB from his advice column:

Hey Steve,

Was that a little bit of Zeppelin’s “Fool In The Rain” during your Thorn drum solo at the Fillmore show I attended? Or just my imagination?

Thanks,

Derek

Derek

I don’t remember specifically, but there’s a pretty good chance that it was a bit of “Fool in the Rain” you heard me break into back at the Fillmore.

You see, I made an important decision years ago about my drumming – and that was to rip off John Bonham as much as possible, every single time I get the chance. And you know, I get that chance quite often.

So, uh, yeah, probably so.

SG

Hi Steve,

First, NICE job on the ‘Live at the Greek’ CD.

I’m wondering what your process was to prepare for playing Zep tunes with Page?

Did he have any suggestions for you after your started rehearsing with him?

Secondary (but related), what’s his ‘feel’ like? Does he tend to lay back in respect to the beat? Right on? Ahead?

Thanks,

Chris

Chris

Thanks for the props.

My process? It wasn’t an exact science, believe me. I seem to recall simply listening to the songs over and over and drinking a lot of beer. My drunken confidence carried me through any of the rough patches in rehearsals and by the time we were out playing publicly, I had deluded myself to the point of feeling pretty damned good about what I was doing.

Mr. Page never gave me any specific suggestions. (Well, none that I remember, anyway – see previous paragraph.)

What’s his feel like? Back? Ahead? Right on? Hell, I don’t know. I never thought about it like that. It just always felt like Jimmy Page. I am not trying to be funny. Think about that for a sec. It felt JUST like playing with Jimmy Page.

And that, Chris, was awesome.

SG

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A couple of examples of Gorman's wit and love of JP and JB from his advice column:

Hey Steve,

Was that a little bit of Zeppelin’s “Fool In The Rain” during your Thorn drum solo at the Fillmore show I attended? Or just my imagination?

Thanks,

Derek

Derek

I don’t remember specifically, but there’s a pretty good chance that it was a bit of “Fool in the Rain” you heard me break into back at the Fillmore.

You see, I made an important decision years ago about my drumming – and that was to rip off John Bonham as much as possible, every single time I get the chance. And you know, I get that chance quite often.

So, uh, yeah, probably so.

SG

Hi Steve,

First, NICE job on the ‘Live at the Greek’ CD.

I’m wondering what your process was to prepare for playing Zep tunes with Page?

Did he have any suggestions for you after your started rehearsing with him?

Secondary (but related), what’s his ‘feel’ like? Does he tend to lay back in respect to the beat? Right on? Ahead?

Thanks,

Chris

Chris

Thanks for the props.

My process? It wasn’t an exact science, believe me. I seem to recall simply listening to the songs over and over and drinking a lot of beer. My drunken confidence carried me through any of the rough patches in rehearsals and by the time we were out playing publicly, I had deluded myself to the point of feeling pretty damned good about what I was doing.

Mr. Page never gave me any specific suggestions. (Well, none that I remember, anyway – see previous paragraph.)

What’s his feel like? Back? Ahead? Right on? Hell, I don’t know. I never thought about it like that. It just always felt like Jimmy Page. I am not trying to be funny. Think about that for a sec. It felt JUST like playing with Jimmy Page.

And that, Chris, was awesome.

SG

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I saw the first Roseland show and months later saw the Tweeter Center show in Camden. For me it was a world of difference. By Tweeter they were a well oiled machine with Jimmy improvising more color and flavor to even the Crowes songs. Gorman in my opinion embodied the flow, power and timing of Bonzo better than anyone I'd ever heard. NOTHING matched the Zep back in the day for sheer musical immensity and spectacle, but as I've said before that later BC/JP show was the BEST rendering of Zep music I've ever heard. Three guitars ads a whole new dimension to the live experience. It was incredible.

Gorman is a consummate pro with just the right feel. Love to hear him outside the Crowes and it looks like in the next few years this will happen!

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I was lucky enough to see Page and the Black Crowes in Bristow Virginia outside of DC. I don't have the exact date right now. What I can say is that Page was playing phenomenal throughout the concert. So we're the Black Crowes. My own personal opinion is that Chris Robinson did an admirable job but his vocal approach was too strained. I liked having the three guitar players and keyboards. In the Light, YTIGC, etc...

We were in hte eigth row. One great memory I have is Page moving to our side of the stage during heartbreaker. I had a clear shot watching him play the solo. The spirit flowed through him that night.

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I saw the third show at Roseland. What a great show. I particularly enjoyed Ten Years Gone. They really captured it as it was so difficult for Zep to perform with all the different guitar parts. But I always enjoyed the '77 versions too.

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Steve, I'm sure you'd know better than me but wasn't Chris Robinson quoted as saying that he respected Jimmy "as a musician, but not as a man," after Jimmy injured his back and pulled out of that tour? I've never heard anything but glowing comments about Jimmy from Gorman, Rich Robinson, and Audley Freed, but Chris was definitely pissy about it.

Was it Chris who was quoted as putting down Jimmy for being "so corporate" - i.e. too friendly and eager to please the record company men. I don't trust my memory.

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I was just going though old posts and came across this one..............thought I'd post something more............

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Steve Gorman is the absolute hands down MVP of Live At the Greek.....His work on Sick Again would bring a tear to Bonzo's eye and make Jr. Bonzo run for cover.

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had tickets to see them at the Woodlands here close to Houston, Texas in 2000, but it was canceled -reason given that Jimmy had injured his back.

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Steve Gorman is the absolute hands down MVP of Live At the Greek.....His work on Sick Again would bring a tear to Bonzo's eye and make Jr. Bonzo run for cover.

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November 17th, 2009

What’s up Steve,

I am 24 years old. Ever since I was old enough to remember my Mom has had a

crazy theory. She believes that Billy Idol is actually Jim Morrison. Pretty

nuts right? She does have some interesting points, but she also lived

through the 60’s and I think LSD is doing some of the talking. Anyway I

was wondering if you could confirm her theory. Bye the way I saw you guys

last week in St. Louis, absolutely the greatest rock band on earth. Please

come back to St. Louis.

Thanks,

Tim

Tim

Believe it or not, your mother is absolutely right.

In the late 60′s, as the COINTELPRO unit of the FBI was methodically (and illegally) breaking the back of the Black Panthers and many other radical groups, J. Edgar Hoover saw the need to target rock n’ roll musicians as well. Their cultural impact and influence on America’s teens was a grave concern to THE MAN, and once The Doors showed up talking about patricide and Oedipal impulses, while wearing leather pants no less, it was decided that enough was enough.

Initially, the Feds toyed with the idea of simply killing the stars they saw as the most threatening, but at some point, Hoover’s boys came upon a far more insidious and devastatingly effective strategy. They decided to neutralize the messages of these visionaries by simply faking their deaths, blackmailing or buying off the now “deceased” stars, and then putting them back to work, complete with a brand new message and identity, for the US Government. LBJ initially green-lighted the project – code name Crock Star – late in his presidency, Tricky Dick’s administration enthusiastically embraced and perfected it, and Gerald Ford saw the program through to its conclusion.

So, Jim Morrison is pushing the cultural envelope a little too much? Nothing a mysterious death in Paris, a lousy English accent, a sneer and some peroxide can’t fix. Billy Idol (Jim) certainly seemed like a real punk at first, but that image soon gave way to videos and songs that were custom built for the masses to ingest.

If lyrics like

“Come on come on come on come on now touch me babe,

Can’t you see that I am not afraid?”

gave teenagers the wrong ideas about premarital sex, then maybe lyrics like

“Oh, oh, oh dancing with myself

Oh, oh, oh dancing with myself

We’ll there’s nothing to lose

And there’s nothing to prove

And I’m dancing with myself”

would help to keep the number of STDs and teen pregnancies in check.

Amazing, isn’t it? So simple, and yet so effective.

You’ll also be interested to know that most of the advances in plastic surgery during the so called “Me Decade” were tested and perfected on what the Feds took to calling the “(White) House Band”.

Anyway, the program worked so well that within a decade or so they discontinued it. In order to ensure long term success, a top secret deal was then cut between Gerald Ford, the Brothers Gibb, and Jeff Lynne to guarantee that rebellion and anarchy would no longer be themes of the pop landscape.

Janis (“take another little piece of my heart now, baby”) Joplin reemerged years later as that (“gonna harden my heart, gonna swallow my tears”) chick from Quarterflash. It took her a while to figure out how to play the saxaphone, obviously, but Janis was a hard worker and the results spoke for themselves.

Jimi (“Are You Experienced?”) Hendrix was “reborn” as Morris (“What Time is it?”) Day.

The list goes on and on.

None of these “reissued” rock stars were allowed to ascend to their previous artistic or commercial heights of course. They were all given a moment or two in the sun complete with more “lulling” messages, and then ushered off to various levels of obscurity, while the legends of their true identities continued to grow larger with each passing year.

Evil? Yes. Impressive? Absolutely.

Don’t mess with THE MAN.

SG

I dunno if he writes this stuff by himself...but it's pretty damned funny...

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Steve Gorman is the absolute hands down MVP of Live At the Greek.....His work on Sick Again would bring a tear to Bonzo's eye and make Jr. Bonzo run for cover.

Agreed! And, he doesn't have to use a click track either. I think the key to Gorman's drumming is how 'relaxed' he is.

Thats how you get "behind the beat".

Jimmy's on fire on this one!

Edited by snapper

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Steve (Gorman) used to work at Savage Pizza years ago in East Atlanta as well as Chris and Rich (for a brief time).

He is playing here soon with Joan Osborne and Audley Freed (who was part of the Black Crowes when Jimmy played/toured with them).

Thanks for sharing/posting this.

R B)

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Agreed! And, he doesn't have to use a click track either. I think the key to Gorman's drumming is how 'relaxed' he is.

Thats how you get "behind the beat".

Jimmy's on fire on this one!

That was awesome!

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