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mysticman560

New Jimmy Page Biography Released

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I finally caved in and bought this book. To my great surprise it's actually not bad.

One bit stood out for me though and made my jaw drop. It says that Mickie Most put cash up to help finance the first US tour in 68/69, and received 1% of Zeppelin's income in perpetuity.

Wtf?! That's not like 1% of the income of Dumpy's Rusty Nuts. That's serious money. Then it's never referred to again, annoyingly. I'd love to know if that's true, and if it is, if it was ever renegotiated.

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On 9/11/2018 at 5:16 PM, the chase said:

It is a shame. Chris Cornell was so good.

Same with Michael Lee.. Jimmy had a Drummer he could really lock in with, probably the best match for him since John Bonham..  

Michael Lee's death was so sad. He was a tremendous drummer. He wasn't Bonham, but who is? I loved how he played and he always looked like he was having a ball.

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12 hours ago, morningson said:

Michael Lee's death was so sad. He was a tremendous drummer. He wasn't Bonham, but who is? I loved how he played and he always looked like he was having a ball.

Agreed, what a talent.  Saw Page and Plant at MSG in July ‘98, they were on fire and my friend took to calling Michael Lee “Animal” after the famous muppet after watching the way he attacked his kit that night.

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Well, I'll try to do my best English, and my point of view is like this:

Evidently, this book reveals more about the author than his subject. Salewicz and his partners in business makes the reader believe they produced “The Definitive Biography” about Jimmy Page, but they fails miserably. I think this is often the case when these so called professional and experienced journos attempts to decipher those elusive and hermetic keys that leads to revelations exposing the enigma that lay behind and upfront Page's figure - and by extention his rock band. The mediocrity of Salewicz work doesn’t do justice to the complete and visionary artist Page was, especially at the height of his possibilities, when he pulled out all his tricks leading up the Zeppelin through the seventies for the sake of art and power - working VERY hard, in focus, from within the recording industry and, of course, kicking some serious asses in this conspiracy process.

Despite interesting sources who provide access to the more intimate aspects of the artist’s life (especially his early years) and some balanced judgements, the author often sinks into a mud of boring writing, common places, speculations and useless details that make his work look more like girly hairdressing gossip than a really serious “definitive” biography, particularly when dear old Chris does his better to deal with Page’s studies about occult sciences, Aleister Crowley and magick (proving one more time this isn't a subject everybody can understand).

So, the book's title is a lame commercial hook and his content a highly subjective interpretation. In justice, it would have been more appropriate to call it “Jimmy Page, a Biography”.

If you are looking for a point of view to study the history of this man in comparison to other biographical works about Jimmy, this book may be useful… but hardly definitive.

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I certainly isn’t the definitive biography. Just another led Led Zeppelin bio with a few extra Page pages.

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12 hours ago, lucisfero said:

Well, I'll try to do my best English, and my point of view is like this:

Evidently, this book reveals more about the author than his subject. Salewicz and his partners in business makes the reader believe they produced “The Definitive Biography” about Jimmy Page, but they fails miserably. I think this is often the case when these so called professional and experienced journos attempts to decipher those elusive and hermetic keys that leads to revelations exposing the enigma that lay behind and upfront Page's figure - and by extention his rock band. The mediocrity of Salewicz work doesn’t do justice to the complete and visionary artist Page was, especially at the height of his possibilities, when he pulled out all his tricks leading up the Zeppelin through the seventies for the sake of art and power - working VERY hard, in focus, from within the recording industry and, of course, kicking some serious asses in this conspiracy process.

Despite interesting sources who provide access to the more intimate aspects of the artist’s life (especially his early years) and some balanced judgements, the author often sinks into a mud of boring writing, common places, speculations and useless details that make his work look more like girly hairdressing gossip than a really serious “definitive” biography, particularly when dear old Chris does his better to deal with Page’s studies about occult sciences, Aleister Crowley and magick (proving one more time this isn't a subject everybody can understand).

So, the book's title is a lame commercial hook and his content a highly subjective interpretation. In justice, it would have been more appropriate to call it “Jimmy Page, a Biography”.

If you are looking for a point of view to study the history of this man in comparison to other biographical works about Jimmy, this book may be useful… but hardly definitive.

Chris Salewicz surrendered all objectivity and credibility while promoting this book earlier this year when in comparison to Jimmy Page he referred to the legendary Keith Richards as "a mere also ran in the greatest UK rock star stakes". Keith's not #1, but he sure as hell places in the Top 20, if not Top 10. Additionally,  if I recall correctly, Chris Salewicz hasn't been in the same room as Jimmy Page since the original interviews were conducted in the late 1970s. It seems Chris used those original interviews as the foundation for the book. 

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On 12/24/2018 at 4:35 AM, SteveAJones said:

Chris Salewicz surrendered all objectivity and credibility while promoting this book earlier this year when in comparison to Jimmy Page he referred to the legendary Keith Richards as "a mere also ran in the greatest UK rock star stakes". Keith's not #1, but he sure as hell places in the Top 20, if not Top 10. Additionally,  if I recall correctly, Chris Salewicz hasn't been in the same room as Jimmy Page since the original interviews were conducted in the late 1970s. It seems Chris used those original interviews as the foundation for the book. 

Yes Steve, I remember those interviews very well. I used to like Chris, he had managed to get some very interesting comments from the usually elusive Jimmy about his many interests other than music (Gig Magazine 1977 and NME 1979). And I remembered him for his interesting NME article about the Page-Anger combat back in 1976 (“Anger Rising”, I think that was called). Part of his stuff had helped me, many years ago, to know things about Jimmy when I was searching very passionately in my pre-internet days. So, when I became aware of his "definitive bio" I thought it would be interesting, despite the reviews I had read in the English newspapers, which of course were sensationalistic promotional crap. I was curious to know more about what new things he has to offer, like every time a new book, mag, and whatever about or in connection with the band is published. So you can bet how mad I was when I read some of his stuff. He sometimes speaks as if he had access to Jimmy's private world. One can clearly understand why Jimmy and the other Zepp lads hated the press so much, even know, no matter how polite the game is.

By the way Steve, how accurately is that information about that divorce of Jimmy's parents? I think you know about it. Salewicz claims that happened in the mid sixties and blah, blah, but I think you said it actually was in the seventies.

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