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What The Famous Say About Led Zeppelin


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i went to an America concert last night here in oz. they were really great!

while chatting, dewey said how back in the late 60's they were in london, just starting out, and he remembered seeing all the great bands of the era : the stones, the who, led zeppelin at royal albert hall ....

wonder if he meant he was in the audience, or bacstage? he talked about supporting pink floyd ...

they seemed like nice blokes, and i must say, they are only 4 years younger than jpj and rp, and 8 younger than jp, and they still tour 100 days a year, and have done so for 42 years .....

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I don't know where to post this question,but here it is:

During the 70's,did Johny Carson or Dick Cavet or anyone on similar tv shows comment on Led Zeppelin events.

I can imagine Carson in monologs mentioning LZ...

Well it'll have to remain in your imagination. In all the times I saw the Johnny Carson show I don't recall a single Led Zeppelin mention.

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Keith Richards: "I played their first LP a lot when I first got it, but then the guy's voice started to get on my nerves for some reason. I dunno why - I imagine just a bit too acrobatic for me."

Jealousy.

Edited by Taro
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Jealousy.

Not really. Keith is more of a classic blues guy, I don't think he'd like his precious blues from the 30's and the 40's to be sang by Robert's high voice.

I'd have felt the same way. But he said Jimmy was a great guitarrist, so it's cool.

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i went to an America concert last night here in oz. they were really great!

while chatting, dewey said how back in the late 60's they were in london, just starting out, and he remembered seeing all the great bands of the era : the stones, the who, led zeppelin at royal albert hall ....

wonder if he meant he was in the audience, or bacstage? he talked about supporting pink floyd ...

they seemed like nice blokes, and i must say, they are only 4 years younger than jpj and rp, and 8 younger than jp, and they still tour 100 days a year, and have done so for 42 years .....

anyone have any info on this?

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Not really. Keith is more of a classic blues guy, I don't think he'd like his precious blues from the 30's and the 40's to be sang by Robert's high voice.

I'd have felt the same way. But he said Jimmy was a great guitarrist, so it's cool.

Listen to 'Happy',great song but Keith you register is a wee bit,....high? :lol:

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  • 2 months later...

From Duff McKaggan's (Guns 'n Roses) autobiography 'It's so easy'.

I had seen Refuzor (Seattle punk legend) flyers up around town and instantly recognized him when he said

hello as we walked into the room. To me, this was like meeting someone from Led Zeppelin.

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  • 4 weeks later...

"Being a hopeless Motown funk brothers addict, I naturally levitated toward the primal soul music of my black heroes from the very beginnings in the mid 1950s. As a guitar wrangler from the Joe Pedorsik Capitol School of Music on Grand River in Detroit, Led Zeppelin's music struck what I believe to be a much deeper chord in me, as I immediately identified the Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, Mose Allison, et al touch in the licks and delivery. Though somewhat embarrassing that, instead of an American band, it took a combo of white limeys to accurately grasp, appreciate, and interpret the moving music of these black masters, I nonetheless worshipped the Bonham/Jones rhythm section as it propelled the thick, nasty sex tones of Page's Les Paul and Plant's black-cat-moan vocals. This reintroduction of black American soul and blues music enflamed the American rock band explosion. God bless them."

- Ted Nugent

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"Being a hopeless Motown funk brothers addict, I naturally levitated toward the primal soul music of my black heroes from the very beginnings in the mid 1950s. As a guitar wrangler from the Joe Pedorsik Capitol School of Music on Grand River in Detroit, Led Zeppelin's music struck what I believe to be a much deeper chord in me, as I immediately identified the Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, Mose Allison, et al touch in the licks and delivery. Though somewhat embarrassing that, instead of an American band, it took a combo of white limeys to accurately grasp, appreciate, and interpret the moving music of these black masters, I nonetheless worshipped the Bonham/Jones rhythm section as it propelled the thick, nasty sex tones of Page's Les Paul and Plant's black-cat-moan vocals. This reintroduction of black American soul and blues music enflamed the American rock band explosion. God bless them."

- Ted Nugent

I have the book where this Ted Nugent quote is from.

Personally, I do not give an eff what ted nugent has to say or about his opinions about Jimmy Page and Led Zeppelin. Most of his past quotes concerning Jimmy and/or Led Zeppelin have always been negative or full of sarcasm. This coming from someone who has claimed that he has never done or taken a drug(s) ever in his life. Also, coming from a man who was so naive back in the mid to late 1970's that his managers and accountants embezzled (supposedly) millions of dollars from him.

Jimmy Page and Led Zeppelin are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and are recipients of the very Prestigious Kennedy Center Honors Awards (among a dozen more accolades). What has become of the very arrogant and outlandish sweaty teddy? He will never be in the ranks or ever come close to the populartiy, influence, etc... Of Led Zeppelin or Jimmy Page.

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"Being a hopeless Motown funk brothers addict, I naturally levitated toward the primal soul music of my black heroes from the very beginnings in the mid 1950s. As a guitar wrangler from the Joe Pedorsik Capitol School of Music on Grand River in Detroit, Led Zeppelin's music struck what I believe to be a much deeper chord in me, as I immediately identified the Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, Mose Allison, et al touch in the licks and delivery. Though somewhat embarrassing that, instead of an American band, it took a combo of white limeys to accurately grasp, appreciate, and interpret the moving music of these black masters, I nonetheless worshipped the Bonham/Jones rhythm section as it propelled the thick, nasty sex tones of Page's Les Paul and Plant's black-cat-moan vocals. This reintroduction of black American soul and blues music enflamed the American rock band explosion. God bless them."

- Ted Nugent

By far the most positive comment I've ever heard from Nugent on Zeppelin, and Page in particular. I have to think his time with Jason on that reality show had something to do with that.

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Listen to 'Happy',great song but Keith you register is a wee bit,....high? :lol:

Wasn't he always *cough* "high" ? :D the Stones and Zeppelin are distinct things, you could only hope of a bad awnser when you ask the guitarist of one band what he thinks about the other. I'd think he wouldn't give two sh*ts about Led Zeppelin, but at least he confirmed that he was good mates with Jimmy... Kinda like how Pete from The Who feels about Led Zeppelin.
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Ritchie Blackmore after leaving Deep Purple 1975.

''I wasn't happy with the last American Tour.We didn't sell out.

They told me it was the recession,then Led Zeppelin sold out every hall in the country''

:goodpost:

Edited by Geezer
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Politics and nasty past comments about Zeppelin aside, ya gotta admit, the Nuge is one of the most incredible live guitar players in rock and roll (listen to Double Live Gonzo if you doubt it!)

...saw Ted open up for Lynryd Skynyrd (Tribute Band IMHO) here in Barrie a few years ago. He was loud and great. Yeah, he can play!
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  • 3 months later...

Ritchie Blackmore after leaving Deep Purple 1975.

''I wasn't happy with the last American Tour.We didn't sell out.

They told me it was the recession,then Led Zeppelin sold out every hall in the country''

Ritchie Blackmore, also back in 1975 (New Musical Express 1975-08-02):

"I either listen to Bach or Hard Rock done by a very good band. Not too many good hard rock bands around.... Zeppelin sometimes pull out something good."

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  • 1 month later...

i was given the new Eagles dvd for my birthday. i have been a fan since about 1975 or so - love their music.

it was really interesting to learn how they got together - and parted - and got together again .... plus the line-up changes.

anyway, Don Henley made a few Led Zeppelin references ....

* he talked about how in the 70's, most bands only lasted a few years, but they thought they could keep going longer, because the good ones "like the stones and led zeppelin were still going strong ... "

* he talked about feeling in awe at the thought of recording in a studio that the great Led Zeppelin had recorded in ...

* they used Glynn Johns for awhile, too, but that didn't go so well. Henley said that Johns wanted to keep them more country, and they parted.

* Henley said that he wanted to get a louder drum sound, like John Bonham, and when asked how to do it, he was told to hit the drums harder, but he said he could never hit them as hard as Bonham. :)

they played a snippet of communication breakdown, and shoed a pic of the band, and of bonzo.

i think Henley is a fan :)

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Nicolas Cage:

You mention "Leaving Las Vegas." Is winning another Oscar important to you? Or is it now more, "Well, I did that. Now I just do what I'm going to do"?
It's not important to me. In fact, I think that if you go about making movies to win Oscars, you're really going about it the wrong way. I think that it's ... right now, what I'm excited about is trying to create a [pauses] kind of a cultural understanding through my muse that is part of the zeitgeist that isn't motivated by vanity or magazine covers or awards. It's more, not countercultural, but counter-critical. I would like to find a way to embrace what Led Zeppelin did, in filmmaking.

That's an interesting way to put it.
Do you know what I mean? They did no press, you know?

And "Stairway to Heaven" wasn't even a single.
Yeah! And they were the biggest band in the world and they remained intimately mysterious -- because they just went about it their own way, or against what the advice might have been or what the council might have been. And I admire that. And I would like to tap into more exploration of horror films and just everything that I shouldn't be doing, according to representation.

http://news.moviefone.com/2012/02/14/nicolas-cage-ghost-rider_n_1276535.html?ref=moviefone

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Def Leppard co-founder Steve Clark:

"He's the main reason I play with a Les Paul hanging at knee level."

"I like Jimmy Page not just for the guitar playing, but he wrote most of the material, he produced it played his solos, and live, he was a good showman. So the whole package really influenced me a lot, rather than just to sit down on a stool and play faster than somebody else".

"I heard the first Led Zeppelin album at a friend's house - and that was it. I had to have an electric. That was what I wanted to do. "

"I began by learning classical guitar and then I turned to rock after hearing 'How Many More Times' by Led Zeppelin, As soon as I heard it I immediately thought, 'This is it! This is my vocation in life!'"

"Apart from being a great lead guitarist, Page is an exceptionally clever rhythm player and also one hell of a producer and songwriter. He's definitely one of the all-time greats and I've always loved listening to his work."

Joe Elliott co-founder of Def Leppard: "When Pete Willis was in the band in the early days he was listening a lot to Pat Travers and Judas Priest which is where the very heavy stuff came in. Steve [Clark], our main writer, was more into Zeppelin.

Joe Elliott: "We all used to listen to different forms of music. Like Steve Clark, who writes most of the music, his favorite bands, 2 bands, are Zeppelin and the New York Dolls and you can't get further apart than those"

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