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Cinematic Blunders: The Song Remains The Same

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Cinematic blunders

Getting through The Song Remains the Same

By MATT ASHARE | December 4, 2007

The Portland Phoenix

Led Zeppelin have rarely missed a promotional opportunity, and the occasion of their current reunion — one that brings Robert Plant and Jimmy Page back together with bassist John Paul Jones for the first time since their 1995 Hall of Fame induction — is no exception. With the December 10 London show set up to honor Atlantic co-founder Ahmet Ertegun fast approaching, Zep have reissued both the 1973 concert film The Song Remains the Same as a two-disc DVD (with a newly remastered soundtrack) and a brand new two-disc greatest-hits collection, Mothership, that also comes in a deluxe three-disc version with a 20-track DVD of live performances taken from the 2003 DVD set Led Zeppelin.

Unfortunately, The Song Remains the Same remains, after 25 years, one of the worst concert films ever. Or perhaps I should say it's one of the more unfortunate advertisements for a rock band ever released as cinema, even if it has been responsible over the years for countless custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill. That's not to suggest that the film doesn't have its redeeming moments: the performances of "Rock and Roll," "Black Dog," "Misty Mountain Hop," and even the title track go a long way toward conveying the special power of Zeppelin's fusion of American blues and British folk. And until the 2003 live set was released, The Song Remains the Same was one of the very few live documents of Zeppelin running through their classic repertoire. But by 1973, the year The Song Remains the Same was recorded on an American tour (mostly at Madison Square Garden, though the DVD provides no specific information), Zeppelin were a behemoth of a band — the very epitome of the sort of excess that punk-rockers would rise up against just a few years later. As Robert Plant remarks in an interview about the film that's part of the bonus disc, "If we're going to be self-indulgent, we might as well try to expend that indulgence a bit."

Or does he say "expand that indulgence a bit"? It's hard to tell. But by '73, it was no longer enough for Plant, Page, Jones, and drummer John Bonham to get up on stage and play. Everything had to be bigger and better than the last time around. (It says something about where the band's collective head was at that they've included on the bonus disc a news clip from Tampa, where, yes, they finally sold more tickets to a rock show than the Beatles.) It was the era of an arms race in rock and roll, where every huge band would try to outdo every other huge band in terms of volume, light show, and costumery, almost all of which is absolutely unforgivable in The Song Remains the Same. I mean, who dressed John Paul Jones, and why didn't somebody put a stop to it? Plant's chest-baring outfit and Page's black-magic suit aren't particularly egregious, but Jones is wearing a frock that looks as if it belonged in Middle-earth. The show itself was all about Led Zeppelin overpowering the crowd with flashy displays of skill and volume. Thus the 23-minute version of "Dazed and Confused," replete with all of Page's sonic tricks, including the violin bow he'd been using since the band's inception in '68. ("Dazed and Confused" was, after all, a song he brought over from the Yardbirds when he formed Zeppelin.)

To say that The Song Remains the Same drags a bit in places would be too kind to films that actually do drag. And that's just the first 10 minutes. After the gangsters have slain the werewolf (you really must see the film to appreciate just how absurd the little story lines are), Plant and his wife have enjoyed watching their children play in the nude, and Bonham has tooled around in one of his classic cars, it's a big relief to see the band finally stepping off their plane in the States, on their way to the gig. The problem is that the gig keeps getting interrupted by these fantasy sequences, each of which is supposed to reflect something essential about the character of a bandmember — sort of like the animal costumes suggested in This Is Spinal Tap. So we get a rescue mission back to Middle-earth, where a maiden waits in distress, except it turns out that John Paul Jones is the hideous monster and he's just headed home to spend a little time with his wife and kids, or something like that. And there's Plant on horseback with his raven, riding to a castle to dispatch some bad guy with a sword, and Page climbing that hill toward the wizened white wizard, and more of Bonham zipping around with his cars and motorcycles — all interspersed among the actual performances, so that one minute you're watching Page play a ripping solo and then next he's off on some mountaintop.

But it's Peter Grant, the band's notorious manager, who steals the show. He has a nice little row backstage with someone from the facility who appears to have allowed illegal merchandisers into the building. The towering legendarily fearsome, Grant is pissed, and by the scene's end, you're pretty sure that you don't ever want to make this guy mad at you. (Fear not: he died in 1995.) Later, he's more in control as he reports the theft of almost $200,000 of Zeppelin's money from a strongbox at their hotel. No indication is ever given as to whether the missing 200 grand was ever recovered by New York's finest.

The new edition of the film does include a couple of extra performances "Celebration Day," "Over the Hills and Far Away," "Misty Mountain Hop," and "The Ocean," all from that same '73 tour. But the best live Zeppelin is the stuff they recorded long before they had any plans to make a movie, and most of the best of it can be found on the bonus disc that comes with Mothership. Here you get much rawer footage of a younger, less self-conscious Zeppelin powering through the blooze funk of "We're Gonna Groove," "I Can't Quit You Babe," and a much more spontaneous "Dazed and Confused." By the time they get to a furious and fast "Communication Breakdown," they sound almost like a punk band, and it's a relief to hear a live "Stairway to Heaven" without all of the ad-libs Plant plants in The Song Remains the Same. This is a lean, mean, explosive Zeppelin, wearing sensible clothes and not trying so much to "expend" or "expand" their indulgence. It's one very good reason not to spend your money on the version of Mothership that doesn't come with the DVD. Or, better yet, go on a hunt for that five-hour, two-DVD 2003 Led Zeppelin set.

http://thephoenix.co...ge=2#TOPCONTENT

...custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill...

hysterical.gif

Edited by SteveAJones

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Cinematic blunders

Getting through The Song Remains the Same

By MATT ASHARE | December 4, 2007

The Portland Phoenix

Unfortunately, It's (there is) one very good reason not to spend your money on the version of Mothership set.......(it's a classic now)

End of Story...

http://thephoenix.co...ge=2#TOPCONTENT

...custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill...

hysterical.gif

Edited by PlanetPage

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Cinematic blunders

Getting through The Song Remains the Same

By MATT ASHARE | December 4, 2007

The Portland Phoenix

Led Zeppelin have rarely missed a promotional opportunity, and the occasion of their current reunion — one that brings Robert Plant and Jimmy Page back together with bassist John Paul Jones for the first time since their 1995 Hall of Fame induction — is no exception. With the December 10 London show set up to honor Atlantic co-founder Ahmet Ertegun fast approaching, Zep have reissued both the 1973 concert film The Song Remains the Same as a two-disc DVD (with a newly remastered soundtrack) and a brand new two-disc greatest-hits collection, Mothership, that also comes in a deluxe three-disc version with a 20-track DVD of live performances taken from the 2003 DVD set Led Zeppelin.

Unfortunately, The Song Remains the Same remains, after 25 years, one of the worst concert films ever. Or perhaps I should say it's one of the more unfortunate advertisements for a rock band ever released as cinema, even if it has been responsible over the years for countless custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill. That's not to suggest that the film doesn't have its redeeming moments: the performances of "Rock and Roll," "Black Dog," "Misty Mountain Hop," and even the title track go a long way toward conveying the special power of Zeppelin's fusion of American blues and British folk. And until the 2003 live set was released, The Song Remains the Same was one of the very few live documents of Zeppelin running through their classic repertoire. But by 1973, the year The Song Remains the Same was recorded on an American tour (mostly at Madison Square Garden, though the DVD provides no specific information), Zeppelin were a behemoth of a band — the very epitome of the sort of excess that punk-rockers would rise up against just a few years later. As Robert Plant remarks in an interview about the film that's part of the bonus disc, "If we're going to be self-indulgent, we might as well try to expend that indulgence a bit."

Or does he say "expand that indulgence a bit"? It's hard to tell. But by '73, it was no longer enough for Plant, Page, Jones, and drummer John Bonham to get up on stage and play. Everything had to be bigger and better than the last time around. (It says something about where the band's collective head was at that they've included on the bonus disc a news clip from Tampa, where, yes, they finally sold more tickets to a rock show than the Beatles.) It was the era of an arms race in rock and roll, where every huge band would try to outdo every other huge band in terms of volume, light show, and costumery, almost all of which is absolutely unforgivable in The Song Remains the Same. I mean, who dressed John Paul Jones, and why didn't somebody put a stop to it? Plant's chest-baring outfit and Page's black-magic suit aren't particularly egregious, but Jones is wearing a frock that looks as if it belonged in Middle-earth. The show itself was all about Led Zeppelin overpowering the crowd with flashy displays of skill and volume. Thus the 23-minute version of "Dazed and Confused," replete with all of Page's sonic tricks, including the violin bow he'd been using since the band's inception in '68. ("Dazed and Confused" was, after all, a song he brought over from the Yardbirds when he formed Zeppelin.)

To say that The Song Remains the Same drags a bit in places would be too kind to films that actually do drag. And that's just the first 10 minutes. After the gangsters have slain the werewolf (you really must see the film to appreciate just how absurd the little story lines are), Plant and his wife have enjoyed watching their children play in the nude, and Bonham has tooled around in one of his classic cars, it's a big relief to see the band finally stepping off their plane in the States, on their way to the gig. The problem is that the gig keeps getting interrupted by these fantasy sequences, each of which is supposed to reflect something essential about the character of a bandmember — sort of like the animal costumes suggested in This Is Spinal Tap. So we get a rescue mission back to Middle-earth, where a maiden waits in distress, except it turns out that John Paul Jones is the hideous monster and he's just headed home to spend a little time with his wife and kids, or something like that. And there's Plant on horseback with his raven, riding to a castle to dispatch some bad guy with a sword, and Page climbing that hill toward the wizened white wizard, and more of Bonham zipping around with his cars and motorcycles — all interspersed among the actual performances, so that one minute you're watching Page play a ripping solo and then next he's off on some mountaintop.

But it's Peter Grant, the band's notorious manager, who steals the show. He has a nice little row backstage with someone from the facility who appears to have allowed illegal merchandisers into the building. The towering legendarily fearsome, Grant is pissed, and by the scene's end, you're pretty sure that you don't ever want to make this guy mad at you. (Fear not: he died in 1995.) Later, he's more in control as he reports the theft of almost $200,000 of Zeppelin's money from a strongbox at their hotel. No indication is ever given as to whether the missing 200 grand was ever recovered by New York's finest.

The new edition of the film does include a couple of extra performances "Celebration Day," "Over the Hills and Far Away," "Misty Mountain Hop," and "The Ocean," all from that same '73 tour. But the best live Zeppelin is the stuff they recorded long before they had any plans to make a movie, and most of the best of it can be found on the bonus disc that comes with Mothership. Here you get much rawer footage of a younger, less self-conscious Zeppelin powering through the blooze funk of "We're Gonna Groove," "I Can't Quit You Babe," and a much more spontaneous "Dazed and Confused." By the time they get to a furious and fast "Communication Breakdown," they sound almost like a punk band, and it's a relief to hear a live "Stairway to Heaven" without all of the ad-libs Plant plants in The Song Remains the Same. This is a lean, mean, explosive Zeppelin, wearing sensible clothes and not trying so much to "expend" or "expand" their indulgence. It's one very good reason not to spend your money on the version of Mothership that doesn't come with the DVD. Or, better yet, go on a hunt for that five-hour, two-DVD 2003 Led Zeppelin set.

http://thephoenix.co...ge=2#TOPCONTENT

...custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill...

hysterical.gif

I love the film. I have seen it a hundred times at least. The concert footage is tight. I love seeing Peter Grant in action. Robert's rotten teeth were so English, and when he talked about the "cosmic energy" and went "yeah!!!!.. Bash!" before the band transitioned into "Since I've Been Loving You" I felt I had really been backstage with the guys. Robert's fantasy scenes, especially the parts during the Rain Song, really hit home as far as what it means to have a real here and now for a particular chic. I don't know if it was love, but I am pretty sure it was enough that some fat castle guard wouldn't stand in the way.

Sure, it was hokie. But, TSRTS was a lot more cool as hell. Que it up, I will watch again right now!

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Well, Christmas is on the way so to Mr Matt Ashare i say:

You're a rotter, Mr. Grinch.

You're the king of sinful sots.

Your heart's a dead tomato splot

With moldy purple spots,

Mr. Grinch.

Your soul is an apalling dump heap overflowing

with the most disgraceful assortment of deplorable

rubbish imaginable,

Mangled up in tangled up knots.

You nauseate me, Mr. Grinch.

With a nauseaus super-naus.

You're a crooked jerky jockey

And you drive a crooked horse.

Mr. Grinch.

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I LOVE TSRTS's music (but I usually skip the non-musical parts <_<)

I looked at the concert footages over and over. I'm always melting seeing Robert hitting his chest on SIBLY ("you don't want me no more"), Jimmy teasing the audience with the guitar on Dazed (when he's shaking his ass, like waving a tail - just before "Do it!" :P ). I love the "chat" between JPJ and Bonzo during Dazed. In fact, I LOVE that Dazed as it entirely! No, I LOVE all the songs from that concert (including Celebration Day, or OTHFA,or The Ocean). Sometime I put the TSRTS DVD when I want to sleep (because I know it by heart, it doesen't bother my sleep, like the TV)

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I hate the bashing this film gets. I love it and think it's way more entertaining than most of the supposed good concert films of the past. TSRTS rocks!

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I hate the bashing this film gets. I love it and think it's way more entertaining than most of the supposed good concert films of the past. TSRTS rocks!

Hi Wolfman, amen to that, the only thing i disagree with you about is i would have used the word "all" rather than the word "most", but you all knew that didnt you?

For all its faults, like not being 4 hours long and missing out on some songs, i have and will watch it a least once a month, religiously, untill the day i die, and maybe even longer. :D

Regards, Danny

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Cinematic blunders

Getting through The Song Remains the Same

By MATT ASHARE | December 4, 2007

The Portland Phoenix

Led Zeppelin have rarely missed a promotional opportunity, and the occasion of their current reunion — one that brings Robert Plant and Jimmy Page back together with bassist John Paul Jones for the first time since their 1995 Hall of Fame induction — is no exception. With the December 10 London show set up to honor Atlantic co-founder Ahmet Ertegun fast approaching, Zep have reissued both the 1973 concert film The Song Remains the Same as a two-disc DVD (with a newly remastered soundtrack) and a brand new two-disc greatest-hits collection, Mothership, that also comes in a deluxe three-disc version with a 20-track DVD of live performances taken from the 2003 DVD set Led Zeppelin.

Unfortunately, The Song Remains the Same remains, after 25 years, one of the worst concert films ever. Or perhaps I should say it's one of the more unfortunate advertisements for a rock band ever released as cinema, even if it has been responsible over the years for countless custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill. That's not to suggest that the film doesn't have its redeeming moments: the performances of "Rock and Roll," "Black Dog," "Misty Mountain Hop," and even the title track go a long way toward conveying the special power of Zeppelin's fusion of American blues and British folk. And until the 2003 live set was released, The Song Remains the Same was one of the very few live documents of Zeppelin running through their classic repertoire. But by 1973, the year The Song Remains the Same was recorded on an American tour (mostly at Madison Square Garden, though the DVD provides no specific information), Zeppelin were a behemoth of a band — the very epitome of the sort of excess that punk-rockers would rise up against just a few years later. As Robert Plant remarks in an interview about the film that's part of the bonus disc, "If we're going to be self-indulgent, we might as well try to expend that indulgence a bit."

Or does he say "expand that indulgence a bit"? It's hard to tell. But by '73, it was no longer enough for Plant, Page, Jones, and drummer John Bonham to get up on stage and play. Everything had to be bigger and better than the last time around. (It says something about where the band's collective head was at that they've included on the bonus disc a news clip from Tampa, where, yes, they finally sold more tickets to a rock show than the Beatles.) It was the era of an arms race in rock and roll, where every huge band would try to outdo every other huge band in terms of volume, light show, and costumery, almost all of which is absolutely unforgivable in The Song Remains the Same. I mean, who dressed John Paul Jones, and why didn't somebody put a stop to it? Plant's chest-baring outfit and Page's black-magic suit aren't particularly egregious, but Jones is wearing a frock that looks as if it belonged in Middle-earth. The show itself was all about Led Zeppelin overpowering the crowd with flashy displays of skill and volume. Thus the 23-minute version of "Dazed and Confused," replete with all of Page's sonic tricks, including the violin bow he'd been using since the band's inception in '68. ("Dazed and Confused" was, after all, a song he brought over from the Yardbirds when he formed Zeppelin.)

To say that The Song Remains the Same drags a bit in places would be too kind to films that actually do drag. And that's just the first 10 minutes. After the gangsters have slain the werewolf (you really must see the film to appreciate just how absurd the little story lines are), Plant and his wife have enjoyed watching their children play in the nude, and Bonham has tooled around in one of his classic cars, it's a big relief to see the band finally stepping off their plane in the States, on their way to the gig. The problem is that the gig keeps getting interrupted by these fantasy sequences, each of which is supposed to reflect something essential about the character of a bandmember — sort of like the animal costumes suggested in This Is Spinal Tap. So we get a rescue mission back to Middle-earth, where a maiden waits in distress, except it turns out that John Paul Jones is the hideous monster and he's just headed home to spend a little time with his wife and kids, or something like that. And there's Plant on horseback with his raven, riding to a castle to dispatch some bad guy with a sword, and Page climbing that hill toward the wizened white wizard, and more of Bonham zipping around with his cars and motorcycles — all interspersed among the actual performances, so that one minute you're watching Page play a ripping solo and then next he's off on some mountaintop.

But it's Peter Grant, the band's notorious manager, who steals the show. He has a nice little row backstage with someone from the facility who appears to have allowed illegal merchandisers into the building. The towering legendarily fearsome, Grant is pissed, and by the scene's end, you're pretty sure that you don't ever want to make this guy mad at you. (Fear not: he died in 1995.) Later, he's more in control as he reports the theft of almost $200,000 of Zeppelin's money from a strongbox at their hotel. No indication is ever given as to whether the missing 200 grand was ever recovered by New York's finest.

The new edition of the film does include a couple of extra performances "Celebration Day," "Over the Hills and Far Away," "Misty Mountain Hop," and "The Ocean," all from that same '73 tour. But the best live Zeppelin is the stuff they recorded long before they had any plans to make a movie, and most of the best of it can be found on the bonus disc that comes with Mothership. Here you get much rawer footage of a younger, less self-conscious Zeppelin powering through the blooze funk of "We're Gonna Groove," "I Can't Quit You Babe," and a much more spontaneous "Dazed and Confused." By the time they get to a furious and fast "Communication Breakdown," they sound almost like a punk band, and it's a relief to hear a live "Stairway to Heaven" without all of the ad-libs Plant plants in The Song Remains the Same. This is a lean, mean, explosive Zeppelin, wearing sensible clothes and not trying so much to "expend" or "expand" their indulgence. It's one very good reason not to spend your money on the version of Mothership that doesn't come with the DVD. Or, better yet, go on a hunt for that five-hour, two-DVD 2003 Led Zeppelin set.

http://thephoenix.co...ge=2#TOPCONTENT

...custom van paint jobs of wizards wielding mysterious lights at the top of a hill...

hysterical.gif

IMHO Matt Ashare is yet another idiot critic! :dont:

This film is a great insight into Led Zeppelin at that time and is still the best concert film. I just put in on again and have probably watched it well over a few 1000 times.

Whatever...could care less about his opinion! It's all abunch of :blahblah:

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I can handle everything in TSRTS except when the crow attacks that dude in the castle. I laughed at that scene when I was 16, and I laugh at it now. It's tied to his belt with a piece of string for pete's sake....like a plastic crunch bird is trying to eat his ass ! :D

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As soon as he said the film had Misty Mountain Hop in it, I stopped reading. Did he even watch the f-ing thing??? :blink:

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I love this movie fantasy scenes and all If you drop Acid and watch it the fantasy stuff really works and when I used to see it at the roxey theater on Danforth Ave in Toronto, the audience used to have sayings and yell stuff out during the sequences (similar to stuff in the Rocky Horror) Best Trips I ever had… Purple mini mics and Led Zeppelin what a combo :-)

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If they replaced the stupid fantasy scenes with concert footage, the film would be much better.

I said this somewhere before, sorry, but the scene with Robert Plant is really dumb. But, I could fast forward, that's not the problem. What is so sad is that it replaces footage from the Rain Song. But, oh, those few magical moments (seconds) at the end with Jimmy playing ... I heard footage was lost and so replaced with the fantasy scenes. Anyone know if that's true?

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I said this somewhere before, sorry, but the scene with Robert Plant is really dumb. But, I could fast forward, that's not the problem. What is so sad is that it replaces footage from the Rain Song. But, oh, those few magical moments (seconds) at the end with Jimmy playing ... I heard footage was lost and so replaced with the fantasy scenes. Anyone know if that's true?

I don't think so, the fantasy scenes were planned to be there.

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I said this somewhere before, sorry, but the scene with Robert Plant is really dumb. But, I could fast forward, that's not the problem. What is so sad is that it replaces footage from the Rain Song. But, oh, those few magical moments (seconds) at the end with Jimmy playing ... I heard footage was lost and so replaced with the fantasy scenes. Anyone know if that's true?

Parts of it are cool imo, for example the music goes really well with when the camera pans up towards the trees and the light is coming through.

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Parts of it are cool imo, for example the music goes really well with when the camera pans up towards the trees and the light is coming through.

Actually I really enjoy the film, there's a lot of great moments, Since I've Been Loving You - so beautiful. I also love the improv between John Bonham and John Paul Jones at the beginning of If You're Going to San Francisco, and Jimmy's playing. And, ok, I guess the scene with Robert Plant isn't so bad, just why couldn't they show the Rain Song and the scene both? Sigh ...

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.., im a big a fan of this band as anyone, but i find this a dreadful film, was very happy when the dvd was released so that imho, concert footage of good quality was made available.don't think ive ever endured the whole film without turning it off or loosing the will to live.

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.., im a big a fan of this band as anyone, but i find this a dreadful film, was very happy when the dvd was released so that imho, concert footage of good quality was made available.don't think ive ever endured the whole film without turning it off or loosing the will to live.

I thought the dvd and the film were the same?

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I thought the dvd and the film were the same?

He probably meant the 2003 DVD, not the one of TSRTS.

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.., im a big a fan of this band as anyone, but i find this a dreadful film, was very happy when the dvd was released so that imho, concert footage of good quality was made available.don't think ive ever endured the whole film without turning it off or loosing the will to live.

Hi barrios,

And you're a big fan of the band as anyone are you? I could name a quite few who would disagree.

As for the Film, it kept me sane throughout the 80s, it still does, and it still makes me wonder, sure does, does anybody remember laughter?

All right lets go.

Good Evening.

This is a song that sometimes takes a building in a manner which ourforefathers were very used to. Did you hear that? It's right though, isn't it?That feeling that's left everybody, the cosmic energy! Everybody goesyeah! Bash!"

Jimmy Page Guitar.

This is Called No Quarter.

John Paul Jones, the Piano.

"In between last time we came and this time we've managed to get an album out called Houses of The Holy."

This is called The Song Remains the Same.

Jimmy Page Electric Guitar.

I think this is a Song of Hope.

Our Percussionist, on Drums, John Bonham Moby Dick Dick Dick Dick Dick Dick.

John Bonham, John Bonham, John Bonham, 140lbs of Glory.

New York Good Night.

Awesome. :yay:

Thats just off the top of my head, if i've made a mistake, please correct me, or sue me. :lol:

Regards, Danny

Edited by BIGDAN

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every friday night at the cinema 4 in carbondale, illinois for 6 years. we would buy the record cleaner "rush" in the little black bottle and huff it during "d&c". the only spot i wasn't crazy about is during "tsrts" and the band is cooking so friggin' hot and page is tearing it up and we get the boat, the beach, and robert. but that aside, i've watched this thing for decades and still love it. the soundtrack, too....

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Hi barrios,

And you're a big fan of the band as anyone are you? I could name a quite few who would disagree.

As for the Film, it kept me sane throughout the 80s, it still does, and it still makes me wonder, sure does, does anybody remember laughter?

All right lets go.

Good Evening.

This is a song that sometimes takes a building in a manner which ourforefathers were very used to. Did you hear that? It's right though, isn't it?That feeling that's left everybody, the cosmic energy! Everybody goesyeah! Bash!"

Jimmy Page Guitar.

This is Called No Quarter.

John Paul Jones, the Piano.

Since the last time we came we've managed to get an album out called Houses of the Holy.

This is called The Song Remains the Same.

Jimmy Page Electric Guitar.

I think this is a Song of Hope.

Our Percussionist, on Drums, John Bonham Moby Dick Dick Dick Dick Dick Dick.

John Bonham, John Bonham, John Bonham, 140lbs of Glory.

New York Good Night.

Awesome. :yay:

Thats just off the top of my head, if i've made a mistake, please correct me, or sue me. :lol:

Regards, Danny

I'm pretty sure its "In between last time we came and this time we've managed to get an album out called Houses of The Holy." Still, not really much of a difference to what you wrote haha.

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I'm pretty sure its "In between last time we came and this time we've managed to get an album out called Houses of The Holy." Still, not really much of a difference to what you wrote haha.

Hi Tom kid,

You might just have saved me from an embarrasing moment there, i did a cut and past job from your thread, i just hope nobody saw the join, most people are asleep now so i might have just gotten away with it dont you think? ;)

Then again!!!!!!!!!!!!! :slapface:

Retards, Danny

Hi beatbo, nice of you to drop in, hows it going mate?

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I'v never been much of a fan of the fantasy sequences but generally I think TSRTS's bad reputation(in the UK at least) has alot more to do with the time it was released, such an excessive fiolm/album coming out in late 76 made it a prime target for the punk movement that was just taking off.

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