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Chicken

What Are You Reading?

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It's pretty great! I just finished Robin Osborne's Greece in the Making 1200-479 BC myself.

Thats a huge time period... I might imagine there is alot to say.

The books I've read have been pretty short, looking for something a little longer to hold me over for more than just a few days...

I've read things like Homer's The Odyssey, The Battle on Salamis, the works of Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, etc, and tons of Greek mythology... but nothing about Greece itself... sounds interesting!

Whats it mainly about? If has anything to do with politics and/or warfare, I will be more inclined to read it.

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Thats a huge time period... I might imagine there is alot to say.

The books I've read have been pretty short, looking for something a little longer to hold me over for more than just a few days...

I've read things like Homer's The Odyssey, The Battle on Salamis, the works of Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, etc, and tons of Greek mythology... but nothing about Greece itself... sounds interesting!

Whats it mainly about? If has anything to do with politics and/or warfare, I will be more inclined to read it.

There is a good deal about warfare, but its primary concerns are archaeological and cultural. Have you read Herodotus' Histories? The Waterfield Oxford translation is very good. You might also try Thucydides' The Peloponnesian War (Lattimore translation). And if you haven't read The Iliad, the Fagles translation is amazing--I'm on the last four books at present and it's been fantastic.

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There is a good deal about warfare, but its primary concerns are archaeological and cultural. Have you read Herodotus' Histories? The Waterfield Oxford translation is very good. You might also try Thucydides' The Peloponnesian War (Lattimore translation). And if you haven't read The Iliad, the Fagles translation is amazing--I'm on the last four books at present and it's been fantastic.

I've read the Iliad - it was a required reading in one of my english courses here in college, and I wholly enjoyed it. As for the others you mention, I have some catching up to do.

It just so happens that Herodotus is the main historian from whos accounts The Battle of Salamis (The book I just finished) was assembled.

As for any other histories, I have yet to discover, but I've heard Herodotus had the best accounts, thus I will look into these next.

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any good? looks very interesting. i love lewis carroll and would pick that up if you say it is worth it.

Well, don't take my word for it...I'm no book expert, BUT I DO love Carroll and all his studies on science, maths, applied maths and dimensions. If you like to see where he got his inspiration from, this book is worth looking into.

Robert.

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I'm re-reading John Lydon's autobiography "No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs". I need to stop re-reading things, and find something new!

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I'm re-reading John Lydon's autobiography "No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs". I need to stop re-reading things, and find something new!

excellent book....reread it a few times myself.

oh, and dragster-thanks!

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Waiter Rant: Thanks for the Tip--Confessions of a Cynical Waiter

Chapter one: Amici’s

A big difference between waiters and cooks is the hours they work. Waiters usually work an eight- or nine-hour shift and go home. The kitchen guys, however, are often the first to show up and the last to go home. Fourteen-hour days are common. When a restaurant closes its doors for the night, you’ll probably find half its servers getting blasted at a nearby bar. But you’ll find the kitchen guys sharing a taxi or waiting at a bus stop for a public transportation ride home. Because most fine-dining establishments are located in neighborhoods where residential rents are high, kitchen personnel seldom can afford to live close to their place of employment. That means they often have a very long commute to and from work. One of Amici’s prep cooks buses it from Queens every day. Depending on traffic, that can be a three-hour round-trip six days a week — on top of working a fourteen-hour shift. The waiters at Amici’s (at least the ones without DUIs) have cars and shorter commutes. They have free time. This disparity in leisure hours often leads to resentment between the front and back of the house. At the end of the night the exhausted kitchen guys just want to go home to enjoy what little free time they have left.

-Steve Dublanica

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Christine Carpenter's The Wars of the Roses: Politics and Constitution in England c. 1437-1509, which is excellent.

Park Honan's Christopher Marlowe, Poet and Spy, good so far.

And re-reading The Aeneid, Fitzgerald translation, amazing as always.

Edited by AllisonAdler

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"lamb: the gospel according to biff, christs' childhood pal" by christopher moore

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I'm reading the autobiography by this amazing guy:

foxts2.jpg

This must be an amazing story. Poor guy :(

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Let me know how it is!!!!! :)

It just came in the mail today.. can't wait to tear into it. Also ordered Capote's 'In Cold Blood' and Hunter S Thompsons 'Fear and Loathing in LV'... so excited to get cracking at these. :thumbsup:

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I'm catching up on catalogs and magazines this weekend :) LL Bean, Stitchery, Cooking Light, Country Living ...

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I read an interesting article today on mit folks studying how to turn corn anc corn cobs into fuel in -peru.

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I'm reading No Here Gets out Alive, it's about Jim Morrison.

I also got Jimmy Page: Man, Magus, Musician.

the first one is a good book so far and I hope the second one is too.

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'The Tunnels Of Cu Chi'

These were the tunnels that the commies had and the Americans (25th Infantry 'Tropic Lightning' division) built a base right on top of them.

My brother was there at the time.

:(

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Just ordered this... I have to finish the other three books I've ordered before I get to this, but this looks educational... maybe shed some light on my perceived insanity... :P

411Rw1JG9gL._SL500_BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.jpg

This was a very interesting read. Very informative. I have to admit, that I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would cause it's more science than it is music. Even still, worth reading. :)

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